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  • U.s. Naval Reserve

    The following are satellite photos of United States warships, inactive, in reserves in the event of war or as needed. In the first Gulf War, 79 of these ships were reactivated.


    Beaumont Reserve Fleet, Beaumont, TX. About 50-75 warships, cruisers, destroyers, and frigates by the appearance of it.


    Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, CA. Approximately 40-50 warships. Cruisers, destroyers, frigates.


    James River Reserve Fleet, Ft. Eustis, VA. About 40-60 warships. Looks like a few battleships in the mix.
    "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

  • #2
    Anyone have any info on the number of ships and the classes on inactive reserve?

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    • #3
      Go to the naval section and post a thread asking that to Rick USN.

      He has those numbers i'm sure.

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      • #4
        Really cool pix...
        Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

        Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

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        • #5
          do I see flat decks in there?
          "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed" - President Eisenhower

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          • #6
            Originally posted by UnitedDiversity
            do I see flat decks in there?
            Possibly. The US built a few hundred aircraft carriers during WWII IIRC. Not all large ones, some were smaller.
            "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

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            • #7
              Yes, right of the top of my head there were a dozen to 2 dozen large-deck Essex-class carriers built, 2 dozen Independece-class light carriers and several dozen escort carriers built. The USN's battle fleet at the end of WW II was beyond comprehension, even today.
              TwentyFiveFortyFive

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              • #8
                How many of those carriers acan actually be restored and used today in the jet-age?
                Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bigross86
                  How many of those carriers acan actually be restored and used today in the jet-age?
                  Many of the Essex-class carriers were modernized after World War II to operate jet aircraft via steam catapults. They were also equipped with angled-decks and eventually the Fresnel landing system, which replaced the guys with the paddles doing their little dance to guide the planes in.
                  None of the light carriers or escort carriers were equipped for CTOL jet operation AFIK, but that obviously wouldnt be a probablem for VTOL operations.
                  TwentyFiveFortyFive

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                  • #10
                    So the Essex class carriers would be converted to jets, and all the others would go to the USMC?
                    Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                    Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Actually, a couple of the Essex-class carriers (maybe only 1) were converted to be among first LPHs (Landing Platform Helicopter) until the then-new Iwo Jima-class LPHs joined the fleet. The smaller carriers, the CVLs, didnt really get too much of an upgrade after WW II. They were kinda makeshifts, built on the hull's of light crusiers. I know a couple of them were transferred to foreign navys. The Cabot (Spain) and Belleau Wood (France) come to mind.
                      The escort carriers, the CVEs, were very tiny, having been built on merchant ship hulls. I don't think hardly any were kept too long after WW II ended. As far as I know, none of them even exist anymore.
                      TwentyFiveFortyFive

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                      • #12
                        But if they had to restore the carriers, than only the Essex's would actually go to the navy. The others would be converted into LPH's or stuff like that for the USMC.
                        Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                        Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, remember of course that the Navy always operates the ships and it doesnt really matter what class of ship it is as far as using it for amphibious (USMC) operations. The Navy simply selected the ships it had on hand and simply changed their mission and outfitted them appropriately. Several Essex-class carriers were redesignated CVS since they the centerpiece of an ASW Task Force, some were designated CVA meaning attack carriers and at least 1 was converted to an LPH configuration but this was more a of stop-gap measure, used to prove the concept etc. One of the light carriers was also used as an LPH, so it really didnt matter what class the ship was. Now mind you, the Essex-class carrier they used as an LPH was not the best choice. She was too big, too old and required too much manpower for the mission. The Iwo Jima-class was much better suited to the task.
                          I could probably dig out specific examples of what was used for what or direct you to some good websites that have the info if you want
                          TwentyFiveFortyFive

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                          • #14
                            Can you please? I'm afraid my internet searching skills leave something to be desired...
                            Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                            Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sure no problem. I found some stuff on the web along with some URLs . So here's some info on early LPH ships, all of which were converted WW II carriers of one type or another:
                              OK looking back on my earlier posts, I see that my details were incorrect as I suspected.
                              The first helicopter carrier intended AND convertered to carry a complement of Marines and helos for the purpose of vertical assault was USS Thetis Bay (CVE-90). She was one of the tiny escort carriers from WW II and have been mothballed after the war. She was recommisioned in July 1956 and redesignated CVHA-1. She basically proved the concept of vertical envelopment was valid and feasible. She carried 1,000 Marines and equipped to operate 20 troop-carrying helos. There was plans to convert USS Block Island (CVE-116) to the same role, but the funding was not available, though she was confusingly redesignated LPH-1.
                              There was a total of 3 Essex-class carriers converted to the LPH role but they were only a temporary measure. They were USS Princeton (CV-37/LPH-5) USS Boxer (CV-21/LPH-4) and USS Valley Forge (CV-45/LPH-8. USS Tarawa (CV-40) operated with helos at some point but kept her CV designation.
                              The Iwo Jima-class LPHs started construction in 1959 and went into service in the late 60's and early 70's. They carried a reinforced Marine battalion of 1700-2000 men and some 30 helos. Incidentally, it was only a couple of years ago that the last of the Iwo Jimas was finally decommissioned and the Iwo Jima's proud name is carried on by the latest Wasp-class LHD big-deck amphib carrier.
                              As far as the Essex-class carriers, the Independence-class light carriers, and the various classes of escort carriers go, there are no escort carriers left, they were scrapped years ago. I think that USS Cabot was scrapped or in the process of scrapping after she was returned by Spain. She was the last her breed. There are several Essex-class carriers still left, but only as museums (with 1 exception I think). USS Intrepid is in New York City, USS Hornet is in California, USS Yorktown is in South Carolina, USS Lexington is down in Texas and I think USS Oriskany is still awaiting her destiny with the scrappers in California. She may be gone right now, I'm not sure.
                              I highly recommend Guy Derdall's www.warships1.com, though the site seems to be down at the moment. Also www.navsource.org is also excellent, particularly the link at the bottom of this post. You'll see how the early LPH's had a hugely mixed background and how the sequential numbering of them and Iwo Jimas really got jumbled.http://www.navsource.org/archives/10/11idx.htm
                              TwentyFiveFortyFive

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