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Taking Off Will Be Tricky After Jet Lands At Wrong Airport

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  • Norseman
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Hell...I'd damn well keep them onboard!

    Here's why.

    1. Okay, why/how the screw up? SOPs wrong? How did you succesfully land on a short runway.

    2. How did you figure out you could take off? When did you figure was the rotation time? How did you have the guts to attempt what all thought was near impossible

    3. So long as it isn't systemic these pilots could teach others a lot.

    Mistake? Sure.

    Career ender? Only for narrow minded managers.
    Improvise, Adapt and Overcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tamara
    replied
    Reminds me of an incident that happened at Ft. Hood in the 70's. As I recall from what I was told, a C-130 was in communication with Gray AAF, given clearance to land, broke out of cloud cover, saw the runway, and proceeded in...............

    ..........................to Hood AAF. Gave Hood's tower a sudden surprise to have that Herk suddenly going down their runways..

    Leave a comment:


  • citanon
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Who said they glorious?

    They screwed up....learn from it corporately. Take and apply lessons learned.

    And they did get it out of there.

    Screws ups like this is how SOPs get updated and good organizations grow.

    Where they following company policy? Does this show a systemic training failure?

    No one was killed and nothing was damaged. Don't worry about "who shot John". They may have discovered an new emergency procedure which could save lives and property later.
    It just seems to me that what they discovered was incompetence. I guess we'll see when more facts come out. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by citanon View Post
    This may not have been as glorious as you supposed AR.

    Unanswered questions in Dreamlifter landing - CNN.com Video

    Near the end of this long winded report you hear a clip of audio on the pilots being informed that they were at the wrong airport.

    Controller: "Giant 4241 Heavy, confirm you know which airport you are at?"
    Pilot: "Well (chuckle) we think we have a pretty good pulse"
    Controller: "Giant 4241 Heavy, it appears you are at Jabara..."
    Pilot: "Say again??!!!"

    Yeah.

    Also, the plane was fortunately empty. The short runway, while not long enough for loaded takeoff, was sufficient for empty weight max thrust take off.

    Who said they glorious?

    They screwed up....learn from it corporately. Take and apply lessons learned.

    And they did get it out of there.

    Screws ups like this is how SOPs get updated and good organizations grow.

    Where they following company policy? Does this show a systemic training failure?

    No one was killed and nothing was damaged. Don't worry about "who shot John". They may have discovered an new emergency procedure which could save lives and property later.

    Leave a comment:


  • bonehead
    replied
    I used to watch these behemoths take off when I worked at Boeing in Everette. They flew right over the parking lot. They flew so slowly you would swear they would stall but they flew on…every time.

    I think this incident is endemic of the big picture. Pilots are on "cruise control" to much because of all the automatic functions a plane has.
    No Cookies | thetelegraph.com.au

    Pilots are 'forgetting how to fly'
    BY JOAN LOWY AP AUGUST 31, 2011 7:43AM
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    Automation in the air is dulling pilot skills, experts have warned. Picture: supplied Source: Herald Sun
    PILOTS' "automation addiction'' has eroded their flying skills to the point that they sometimes don't know how to recover from stalls and other mid-flight problems, say pilots and safety officials. The weakened skills have contributed to hundreds of deaths in airline crashes in the last five years.

    Some 51 "loss of control'' accidents occurred in which planes stalled in flight or got into unusual positions from which pilots were unable to recover, making it the most common type of airline accident, according to the International Air Transport Association.

    "We're seeing a new breed of accident with these state-of-the art planes,'' said Rory Kay, an airline captain and co-chair of a Federal Aviation Administration advisory committee on pilot training. "We're forgetting how to fly."

    Opportunities for airline pilots to maintain their flying proficiency by manually flying planes are increasingly limited, the FAA committee recently warned. Airlines and regulators discourage or even prohibit pilots from turning off the autopilot and flying planes themselves, the committee said………...

    Leave a comment:


  • citanon
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Hell...I'd damn well keep them onboard!

    Here's why.

    1. Okay, why/how the screw up? SOPs wrong? How did you succesfully land on a short runway.

    2. How did you figure out you could take off? When did you figure was the rotation time? How did you have the guts to attempt what all thought was near impossible

    3. So long as it isn't systemic these pilots could teach others a lot.

    Mistake? Sure.

    Career ender? Only for narrow minded managers.
    This may not have been as glorious as you supposed AR.

    Unanswered questions in Dreamlifter landing - CNN.com Video

    Near the end of this long winded report you hear a clip of audio on the pilots being informed that they were at the wrong airport.

    Controller: "Giant 4241 Heavy, confirm you know which airport you are at?"
    Pilot: "Well (chuckle) we think we have a pretty good pulse"
    Controller: "Giant 4241 Heavy, it appears you are at Jabara..."
    Pilot: "Say again??!!!"

    Yeah.

    Also, the plane was fortunately empty. The short runway, while not long enough for loaded takeoff, was sufficient for empty weight max thrust take off.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Hell...I'd damn well keep them onboard!

    Here's why.

    1. Okay, why/how the screw up? SOPs wrong? How did you succesfully land on a short runway.

    2. How did you figure out you could take off? When did you figure was the rotation time? How did you have the guts to attempt what all thought was near impossible

    3. So long as it isn't systemic these pilots could teach others a lot.

    Mistake? Sure.

    Career ender? Only for narrow minded managers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stitch
    replied
    Originally posted by citanon View Post
    What will not be taking off ever again are the pilots' careers.
    I was wondering about that; the article didn't say anything, but I'm assuming neither the pilot nor the co-pilot are flying for Boeing anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • citanon
    replied
    What will not be taking off ever again are the pilots' careers.

    Leave a comment:


  • zraver
    replied
    BOEING 747 DREAMLIFTER SUCCESFULL TAKE OFF FROM JABARA KAAO - YouTube

    looks like it took about 4000' for a max power empty weight role out.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigross86
    replied
    Update says they managed to take off

    Leave a comment:


  • Doktor
    replied
    I saw this on the news, and under the impressions of the other thread, I think I have a solution... build a ramp. Or a museum ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Taking Off Will Be Tricky After Jet Lands At Wrong Airport

    Found this amusing . . . . .

    "A Boeing Co. 747 Dreamlifter cargo jet landed at the wrong airfield in Wichita, Kan., on Wednesday night and is now sitting on a runway that's far shorter than those typically needed for takeoff."



    Taking Off Will Be Tricky After Jet Lands At Wrong Airport : The Two-Way : NPR

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