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  • CPU Question

    I'm running a computer with a 1.7Ghz Intel Celeron processor, Williamette 0.18 micron core, 400Mhz FSB.

    I'm looking to upgrade, and I'm looking at a 2.4Ghz P4 with a 0.13 micron core (400Mhz FSB). Would I be able to pop in the 0.13 P4 into the slot the 0.18 Celeron is in? My mobo is an Evo 310v.
    "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

  • #2
    Williamette is Socket 432. I'm not quite sure of the particular CPU you're looking at (the 2.4GHz P4 Northwood core I found was 533MHz FSB), but in any case all the P4s I'm aware of currently use Socket 478.

    Socket XXX is the number of pins on the underside of the CPU, so even if they were compatible it wouldn't physically fit.
    Rule 1: Never trust a Frenchman
    Rule 2: Treat all members of the press as French

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    • #3
      1. Make sure your board is pin compatible with the new processor

      2. Make sure to check with manufacturer to see if there's any BIOS upgrade

      I looked it up on HP site, but I couldn't find anything on what socket it used. Most likely it's a socket 423 board. If that's the case, there's no way you can put a socket 478 in there.
      "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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      • #4
        I have not seen an upgrade path for those either. The EVOs don't have much room in the chassis either for even an additional drive I think. Why not "gut it" get a new board and case and transplant?

        It should not be too complex of a task...:)

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        • #5
          I've given up the idea of "upgrading" the way I got used to, a bit at a time. Now the minimum I expect to have to purchase is a new motherboard, new CPU, and 2GB of RAM.

          This last time that also meant a new HDD (SATA). I think the only thing the same is the case. But Ironduke's seen it, and it's a nice case. ;)

          -dale

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          • #6
            Can anyone help my Son with a problem...A "friend" wiped my lads computer clean hoping to reformat it to its original state however there is no back-up disc.

            His Comp is a PRESTIGIO ADELANTE 364. Is there a Solution out there??

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            • #7
              Dont format it as of now, the Operating system is running right? based on FAT32 or NTFS partition download the software getdataback NTFS/FAT32 , and use it preety nice software.

              if you have erased operating system as well oh well better take professional help.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dave lukins View Post
                Can anyone help my Son with a problem...A "friend" wiped my lads computer clean hoping to reformat it to its original state however there is no back-up disc.

                His Comp is a PRESTIGIO ADELANTE 364. Is there a Solution out there??
                Norton Undelete for Windows is a good product. I have recovered partitions and data with it.:)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ironduke View Post
                  I'm running a computer with a 1.7Ghz Intel Celeron processor, Williamette 0.18 micron core, 400Mhz FSB.

                  I'm looking to upgrade, and I'm looking at a 2.4Ghz P4 with a 0.13 micron core (400Mhz FSB). Would I be able to pop in the 0.13 P4 into the slot the 0.18 Celeron is in? My mobo is an Evo 310v.
                  The Willamette based processors 'spanned' the transition from socket 423 to socket 478. Although it appears that your mobo is in fact a socket 478, you wanna make sure about that. The best move would be to obtain some detailed documentation on processor support for your mobo. It is sometimes necessary to upgrade (flash) the BIOS on a mobo to support newer generation processors. Having said all that, it should be a good upgrade, as the P4 based Celeron processors were 'crippled' compared to the corresponding P4's. So you should significantly increase your processing power with the proposed upgrade. However, note that a 'system' will be limited by it's slowest component. Although you may remove any processing bottleneck, you may still be limited by your RAM or HDD. What O/S are you using? How much memory do you have?

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                  • #10
                    Here's a screenshot of the specs from Sandra:
                    Attached Files
                    "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

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                    • #11
                      Ah very good. That's a very interesting combination of Willamette core with 478 packaging.

                      Next you have to make sure if your board supports the lower voltage requirement of the Northwood core (I think that's the one after Willamette).

                      Can you see the chipset information? It's probably an 845 chipset. That will support Northwood core. But the BIOS has to be compatible.

                      Check with the manufacturer to see if there's a BIOS update or check with support forums to see if there are other users who have gone your route of upgrade.
                      "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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                      • #12
                        Would I be able to install a processor with an FSB greater than 400mhz?
                        "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ironduke View Post
                          Would I be able to install a processor with an FSB greater than 400mhz?
                          Yes you can. However, the board will still run at 400MHz, thus lowering your processor speed.

                          The processor runs a multiplier to determine it's internal speed in relation to the bus. If you look at the picture you provided you can see an item called "multiplier : 17/1x"...meaning the processor has a 17x multiplier, times 100MHz to hit 1.7GHz.

                          Assuming you have a 2.4GHz processor running a 533 FSB, it will have a 2400/133 = 18x multiplier. Plug that CPU in that motherboard will yield you a computer with 1.8GHz.

                          If you have a 2.4GHz processor running an 800 FSB, it will have a 2400/200 = 12x multiplier. You computer with that chip will run at 1.2GHz.

                          Current Intel scheme calls for a "quad pumped" FSB when dealing with main memory bandwidth. The base clock for the motherbard is (in your computer's case) 100MHz. The memory runs at 400MHz effective clock when talking to the processor. The processor's speed is determined by its internal multiplier and the system's base speed. That's why you see a bunch of weird numbers that don't make sense to the average user.

                          The internal multiplier of the CPU has been locked by Intel since Pentium MMX era for consumer releases. Engineering samples have unlocked multipliers so you can hit all kinds of different speeds. This is to prevent the public from buying a cheap CPU and then overclocking it to achieve maximum performance.

                          Sorry for the long winded explanation.
                          "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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                          • #14
                            Looked at the mainboard specs, found this:

                            Maximum FSB Speed/Max Memory FSB = 4x133 = 533Mhz/ 2 x 166 = 333Mhz

                            Correct? Also states maximum supported processor speed is 3.20Ghz+... so I should be able to upgrade to the fastest socket 478 with a 533Mhz FSB... chipset is an Intel 845G.

                            Here's what I'm looking at for a processor:
                            STARMICRO INC. - Detail
                            Attached Files
                            "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

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                            • #15
                              Looks like your board is able to support processors up to 533 FSB, with a maximum of DDR333 (or PC2700) memory.

                              Some people say you should use the fastest memory possible. Some people say you should sync your memory to your processor's bus. In this case, either DDR200 or DDR266, depending on the FSB you want.

                              Modern chipsets can run memory out of sync with the CPU. I'm not quite sure on the performance loss vs matching the speed with CPU but inherently slower memory. Probably negligible. You can use DDR400 RAM. The system will just automatically run it as DDR333.

                              Double check with the manufacturer and with online forum if you can. I'm not an expert with OEM machines. These are my experiences with BIYO systems.

                              If it works, that processor will give you a huge boost in performance. Celeron not only runs on a slow bus, it has 1/4 of the L2 cache as its P4 counterpart. P4 architecture is very sensitive to L2 cache. The larger the better.
                              Last edited by gunnut; 14 Aug 07,, 01:35.
                              "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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