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  • Cold War 2.0: US-China

    US orders China to close Houston consulate

    The US has ordered China to close its consulate in Houston, Texas, by Friday - a move described as "political provocation" by Beijing.
    The US State Department said the decision was taken "in order to protect American intellectual property"
    .

    But China's foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said it was "outrageous and unjustified".

    The statements came after unidentified individuals were filmed burning paper in bins in the building's courtyard.

    Tensions have been rising between the US and China for some time. President Donald Trump's administration has clashed repeatedly with Beijing over trade and the coronavirus pandemic, as well as China's imposition of a controversial new security law on Hong Kong.

    Then on Tuesday, the US justice department accused China of sponsoring hackers targeting labs developing Covid-19 vaccines, charging two Chinese nationals who allegedly spied on US research companies and got help from state agents for other thefts.

    Why did the US say it was closing the consulate?
    The US State Department released a statement shortly after Mr Wang spoke on Wednesday.

    "We have directed the closure of PRC [People's Republic of China] Consulate General Houston, in order to protect American intellectual property and American's private information," State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said.

    She added the US "will not tolerate the PRC's violations of our sovereignty and intimidation of our people, just as we have not tolerated the PRC's unfair trade practices, theft of American jobs, and other egregious behaviour".

    Ms Ortagus also pointed to the Vienna Convention, under which states "have a duty not to interfere in the internal affairs" of a host country.

    The consulate is one of five in US, not counting the embassy in Washington DC. It is unclear why this one was singled out.

    How did China react to the order?

    China called the decision "an unprecedented escalation", saying it violated international law. Mr Wang went on to say Washington had been "shifting the blame to China with stigmatisation and unwarranted attacks".

    He urged the US to reconsider, saying if it insists "on going down this wrong path, China will react with firm countermeasures".

    "In reality, in terms of the number of Chinese and American embassies and consulates in each other's countries and the number of diplomatic and consular staff, the US has far more people working in China," Mr Wang said.

    Chinese state media the Global Times began running a poll on which US consulate to close in response.

    In danger of a spiralling battle

    This is clearly a significant development in the diplomatic sparring between Washington and Beijing.

    The closure of the Chinese consulate in Houston comes soon after news emerged of the unsealing of a US indictment against two men accused of spying on US vaccine development on behalf of China's security services. It is not clear if the two episodes are linked. But it is clear that the Trump administration is determined to step up its very public calling out of Beijing.

    In the midst of a presidential re-election campaign and with the US economy and society battered by the Covid-19 pandemic, Mr Trump has determined that there is political advantage in playing the China card.

    It is hard to see how Beijing can avoid some equivalent response. The danger now is of a spiralling tit-for-tat battle, driven in part by US domestic considerations, which can only make the complex and developing tensions between the US and China even worse.

    What is happening at the consulate?

    The first signs something unusual may be happening at the Houston consulate emerged on Tuesday, when people overlooking the building's courtyard noticed several bins on fire.

    Footage shows people throwing what appears to be paper into the bins. It is not known who they were. People were later filmed appearing to pour water on the bins.

    Emergency services were called to the building on Tuesday evening. However, the Houston police force said on Twitter officers "were not granted access to enter the building", but did see smoke.

    Mr Wang did not directly address the fires in the consulate's courtyard, simply saying it was operating as normal.

    What is stoking tensions between China and US?
    There are a number of flashpoints between Beijing and Washington currently. Some of the most serious are:

    Coronavirus: President Trump has repeatedly referred to Covid-19, the first cases of which were reported in Wuhan in late 2019, as the "China virus". He has also alleged it originated from a Chinese laboratory, despite his own intelligence officers said it "was not manmade or genetically modified". In response, Chinese officials have suggested that Covid-19 might have originated in the US, without evidence.

    Trade: Mr Trump has long accused China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft, but in Beijing there is a perception that the US is trying to curb its rise as a global economic power. The US and China have engaged in a tit-for-tat tariff war since 2018 as a result of the dispute.

    Hong Kong: China's imposition of a sweeping new national security law in Hong Kong in June led the US to revoke the region's preferential economic treatment. Mr Trump has also signed a law to impose sanctions on officials who cracked down on rights. Beijing has accused the US of "gross interference" in its domestic affairs, promising it would retaliate.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

  • #2
    China-US row: Fugitive researcher 'hiding in San Francisco consulate

    A Chinese scientist suspected of visa fraud and concealing ties to the military has fled to China's consulate in San Francisco, the US says.

    Prosecutors allege that the case is part of a Chinese programme to send undercover army scientists to the US.

    On Wednesday the Trump administration ordered the closure of China's mission in Houston, saying it was involved in stealing intellectual property.
    China condemned moves against its scientists and consulates in the US.

    Foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin accused the administration of using excuses to limit, harass or crack down on Chinese scholars in the country.

    "In response to the US's unreasonable actions, China must make a necessary response and safeguard its legitimate rights," he said at a press conference, describing the US allegations as "malicious slander".

    Following the row over the Houston consulate, President Donald Trump threatened to close down more Chinese missions.

    In recent months he has clashed repeatedly with Beijing over trade, the coronavirus pandemic and China's imposition of a controversial new security law on Hong Kong.
    What are the allegations about the San Francisco mission?

    Court filings by prosecutors in a federal court in San Francisco say the defendant, named as Juan Tang, was a biology researcher at the University of California, Davis.

    According to the filings, during an interview with FBI agents last month she said she had not served in the Chinese military.

    However, the document says, an open-source investigation uncovered photos of her wearing military uniform and a search of her home found further evidence of her affiliation with China's People's Liberation Army (PLA).

    "At some point following the search and interview of Tang on June 20, 2020, Tang went to the Chinese consulate in San Francisco, where the FBI assesses she has remained," the filing, first reported on by the Axios news site, reads.

    It adds: "As the Tang case demonstrates, the Chinese consulate in San Francisco provides a potential safe harbor for a PLA official intent on avoiding prosecution in the United States."

    Prosecutors say that this is not an isolated case but "appears to be part of a program conducted by the PLA" to send military scientists to the US on false pretences.

    The document also highlights the cases of two other researchers arrested in California in recent weeks for lying about their alleged ties to the military.

    What is happening at China's consulates?

    The Houston consulate came under scrutiny on Tuesday when people overlooking the building's courtyard noticed several bins on fire.

    Footage showed people throwing what appeared to be paper into the bins.

    Emergency services were called to the building but Houston police say they were not granted access.

    On Wednesday, the administration gave China 72 hours to close the consulate "to protect American intellectual property and Americans' private information".

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said: "We are setting out clear expectations for how the Chinese Communist Party is going to behave. And when they don't, we're going to take actions that protect the American people, protect... our national security, and also protect our economy and jobs."

    The consulate is one of five in the US, not counting the embassy in Washington. China described the closure as a "political provocation".

    What is stoking tensions between China and the US?
    There are a number of flashpoints between Beijing and Washington. Some of the most serious are:

    Coronavirus: President Trump has repeatedly referred to Covid-19 as the "China virus". and alleged it originated from a Chinese laboratory, despite his own intelligence officers saying it "was not manmade". In response, Chinese officials have suggested, without evidence, that Covid-19 might have originated in the US

    Trade: Mr Trump has long accused China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft. The US and China have engaged in a tit-for-tat tariff war since 2018 as a result of the dispute

    Hong Kong: China's imposition of a sweeping new national security law in Hong Kong in June led the US to revoke the region's preferential economic treatment. Beijing has accused the US of "gross interference" in its domestic affairs, promising it will retaliate

    South China Sea: The two countries have also clashed over Beijing's pursuit of offshore resources in disputed waters, with Mr Pompeo calling it a "campaign of bullying".
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

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    • #3
      New US policy on Beijing, 'Distrust and verify,' ends 50 years of Sino-American embrace

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      Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Double Edge View Post
        An interesting way of looking at US - China relations.

        Instead of Cold war 2.0 think of it like the Sino Soviet split

        This is the Sino US split

        https://twitter.com/JulianGewirtz/st...49269969260545

        Both super powers wanted to get to know China and then wanted to cut off relations

        India is no different and we didn't even get as close as the other two.
        Another way of thinking of it

        The way Trump is going at this he is going to make any rapprochement very difficult in the future.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Double Edge View Post
          Another way of thinking of it

          The way Trump is going at this he is going to make any rapprochement very difficult in the future.
          Not Trump, it's the votes he needs for re-election. I wouldn't bet anything on Trump.
          Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

          Comment


          • #6
            US arrests 3 Chinese nationals for visa fraud

            Pompeo: China's Houston consulate was 'hub' of spying

            China is scared of the fat guy. I actually like him.
            Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

            Comment


            • #7
              China Orders U.S. to Close Chengdu Consulate in Retaliation Move

              China ordered the U.S. to close its consulate in the southwestern city of Chengdu, following through on retaliation threats after the Trump administration’s unprecedented decision to shut down the Chinese mission in Houston.

              The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs said Friday that the consulate’s closure was a “legitimate and necessary response to the unjustified act by the U.S.” The widely anticipated retaliation came hours ahead of the U.S.’s deadline for Chinese diplomats to vacate the Houston facility, which the State Department said had served as a hub for spying and influence operations.

              Beijing’s decision will not only oust American diplomats from the capital of Sichuan province -- a region with a population rivaling Germany -- it will close a key listening post for developments in neighboring Tibet. The move will probably have a bigger impact than shutting the U.S. consulate in Wuhan, but less than closing U.S. missions in the key financial centers of Hong Kong or Shanghai.

              Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular news briefing in Beijing that some consulate staff had “engaged in activities inconsistent with their capacity, interfered in China’s internal affairs and harmed China’s national security interests.” By Friday afternoon, dozens of police, plainclothes officers and People’s Liberation Army personnel were seen patrolling the street outside the building, searching phones and ordering people to delete photos.

              While police ordered most reporters and pedestrians to leave the area, China’s state broadcaster began live-streaming footage of the consulate’s entrance. China’s CSI 300 Index slumped 4.4% at the close, while the ChiNext Index dropped 6.1%, the most since Feb. 3.

              “It’s not possible to carry out an entirely equivalent action, but choosing Chengdu shows China wants to reduce the harm made to bilateral relations,” said Wang Yiwei, a former Chinese diplomat and director of China’s Institute of International Affairs at Renmin University in Beijing. “The operations out of Chengdu are not the most high profile of the U.S. mission in China, compared to say Shanghai.”

              The consulate closures illustrate the alarming degree to which relations between the world’s two largest economies have worsened in recent years, as China assumes a more assertive posture on the world stage and the U.S. seeks to check its rise. President Donald Trump and his aides have stepped up attacks on China ahead of the U.S. election in November, accusing Beijing of spying, cybertheft and causing the coronavirus pandemic.

              In a speech at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo accused President Xi Jinping and the Chinese leadership of attempting to “tyrannize inside and outside China forever” in pursuit of global hegemony. “Securing our freedoms from the Chinese Communist Party is the mission of our time,” Pompeo said.

              A commentary published by China’s official Xinhua News Agency moments after the Chengdu announcement said the closure was “aimed at a few extremist forces in the U.S. government, not the American people.” “The U.S. has stirred up trouble in bilateral relations to the point of hysteria,” the commentary said.

              In a sign things could deteriorate further, Wang, the Foreign Ministry spokesman, answered a question on Thursday about the future of the U.S.-China trade deal by saying the American side should think “carefully” about where the relationship was heading. Trump said Thursday that his “phase one” deal means “much less” to him in the wake of the pandemic.

              The Chengdu mission, which opened in 1985, covers Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, as well as Sichuan. The consulate has also served as a key U.S. perch to follow events in Tibet, where Communist Party efforts to suppress dissent have long been a focus of tensions between China and the West.

              In 2012, former Chongqing police chief Wang Lijun sought refuge in the Chengdu consulate with evidence linking the family of his then boss, former Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai, to the death of a British businessman. The episode exposed a scandal that would see Bo ousted and his wife convicted of murder, leading Xi to launch a nationwide anti-corruption campaign.

              “They wanted to make it hurt a little bit more so they picked Chengdu,” said James Green, a former State Department official who is now a senior adviser for geopolitical consulting firm McLarty Associates. “What the Chinese care about more -- and what we care about more -- is what we do out of Chengdu, which is follow Tibet. And shutting that down kind of cuts our link to Tibet, which is a political blow to us.”

              Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin, who had earlier reported the timing of the decision on his Twitter feed, said U.S. diplomats were given the same 72-hour notice as their Chinese counterparts in Houston, meaning they must leave by Monday morning. The Wall Street Journal separately reported, citing unidentified people briefed on the matter, that China had given the affected diplomats 30 days to leave the country.

              Wang Wenbin repeatedly sidestepped questions about when the diplomats would have to leave, saying only “we always talk about reciprocity in diplomacy.”

              “The current situation in China-U.S. relations is not what China desires to see, and the U.S. is responsible for all this,” the Foreign Ministry said earlier Friday. “We once again urge the U.S. to immediately retract its wrong decision and create necessary conditions for bringing the bilateral relationship back on track.”
              Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Oracle View Post
                Not Trump, it's the votes he needs for re-election. I wouldn't bet anything on Trump.
                Right so he will push the China gate idea to the max. This will do damage. Real damage.

                It now becomes a pissing contest with the Dems as to who can bash China more or else.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Double Edge View Post
                  Right so he will push the China gate idea to the max. This will do damage. Real damage.

                  It now becomes a pissing contest with the Dems as to who can bash China more or else.
                  That's good news. The bad news is, this ends in November, if votes are the reason and Trump retains the Presidency.
                  Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Oracle View Post
                    Pompeo: China's Houston consulate was 'hub' of spying

                    China is scared of the fat guy. I actually like him.
                    The way AIM explained it the one in Houston does the spying on rockets & hard materials science.

                    The one in San Francisco does software

                    The one in Seatlle does aircraft

                    that was a good Pgurus session with AIM, the viewers put a lot of interesting questions to him

                    Originally posted by Oracle View Post
                    That's good news. The bad news is, this ends in November, if votes are the reason and Trump retains the Presidency.
                    So this question was asked and he replies at the 53:00 mark that he thinks Trump is provoking a point of no return.

                    This means the disentanglement process will continue even if he wins.

                    Whether it continues with a Democrat in power is an open question.

                    How many dead Americans due to this virus ? where did it come from ? are Americans going to forget.
                    Last edited by Double Edge; 24 Jul 20,, 14:34.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok, back up. Those of us who went through the Real Cold War do not feel this is one. The threat of WWIII during the 60s-90s was real and fear inspiring. Try as I might, 200 Chinese nukes just does not come close to scaring me as the Soviet 55,000 and China's 73 still mainly foot divisions ain't going to keep me awake at night. The Warsaw Pact's 172 Divisions, however, represented the largest and toughest armoured motorized force ever assembled in the history of man.

                      Cold War 2.0? Maybe in some TV special. China ain't in a position to fight WWIII, let alone start WWIII.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It won't be like the last one. This one will be different.
                        Last edited by Double Edge; 25 Jul 20,, 09:25.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cold war 2.0 will not be a hot war. It will be fought mainly on the economic front, as also for resources.

                          Okay, why do most commentators say America is in decline? It's still the #1 country in terms of militay, economy, innovation. Dollar will still be the top reserve currency for the next 25 years. Is it because of the Trump presidency, I mean an inner looking policy of the USGov? Withdrawal from the WHO and such.
                          Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Oracle View Post
                            Pompeo: China's Houston consulate was 'hub' of spying

                            China is scared of the fat guy. I actually like him.
                            So let's see what fat guy has to say. Tried to summarise, see the link for the full version

                            Communist China and the Free World’s Future | State | Jul 23 2020

                            Next year marks half a century since Dr. Kissinger’s secret mission to China, and the 50th anniversary of President Nixon’s trip isn’t too far away in 2022.

                            The world was much different then.

                            We imagined engagement with China would produce a future with bright promise of comity and cooperation.

                            But today – today we’re all still wearing masks and watching the pandemic’s body count rise because the CCP failed in its promises to the world. We’re reading every morning new headlines of repression in Hong Kong and in Xinjiang.

                            We’re seeing staggering statistics of Chinese trade abuses that cost American jobs and strike enormous blows to the economies all across America, including here in southern California. And we’re watching a Chinese military that grows stronger and stronger, and indeed more menacing.

                            I’ll echo the questions ringing in the hearts and minds of Americans from here in California to my home state of Kansas and beyond:

                            What do the American people have to show now 50 years on from engagement with China?

                            Did the theories of our leaders that proposed a Chinese evolution towards freedom and democracy prove to be true?

                            Is this China’s definition of a win-win situation?

                            And indeed, centrally, from the Secretary of State’s perspective, is America safer? Do we have a greater likelihood of peace for ourselves and peace for the generations which will follow us?

                            Look, we have to admit a hard truth. We must admit a hard truth that should guide us in the years and decades to come, that if we want to have a free 21st century, and not the Chinese century of which Xi Jinping dreams, the old paradigm of blind engagement with China simply won’t get it done. We must not continue it and we must not return to it.

                            As President Trump has made very clear, we need a strategy that protects the American economy, and indeed our way of life. The free world must triumph over this new tyranny.

                            As time went on, American policymakers increasingly presumed that as China became more prosperous, it would open up, it would become freer at home, and indeed present less of a threat abroad, it’d be friendlier. It all seemed, I am sure, so inevitable.

                            But that age of inevitability is over. The kind of engagement we have been pursuing has not brought the kind of change inside of China that President Nixon had hoped to induce.

                            The truth is that our policies – and those of other free nations – resurrected China’s failing economy, only to see Beijing bite the international hands that were feeding it.

                            We opened our arms to Chinese citizens, only to see the Chinese Communist Party exploit our free and open society. China sent propagandists into our press conferences, our research centers, our high-schools, our colleges, and even into our PTA meetings.

                            We marginalized our friends in Taiwan, which later blossomed into a vigorous democracy.

                            Ambassador O’Brien ticked off a few examples just the other day: Marriott, American Airlines, Delta, United all removed references to Taiwan from their corporate websites, so as not to anger Beijing.

                            In Hollywood, not too far from here – the epicenter of American creative freedom, and self-appointed arbiters of social justice – self-censors even the most mildly unfavorable reference to China.

                            This corporate acquiescence to the CCP happens all over the world, too.

                            And how has this corporate fealty worked? Is its flattery rewarded? I’ll give you a quote from the speech that General Barr gave, Attorney General Barr. In a speech last week, he said that “The ultimate ambition of China’s rulers isn’t to trade with the United States. It is to raid the United States.”

                            We gave the Chinese Communist Party and the regime itself special economic treatment, only to see the CCP insist on silence over its human rights abuses as the price of admission for Western companies entering China.

                            President Nixon once said he feared he had created a “Frankenstein” by opening the world to the CCP, and here we are.

                            Now, people of good faith can debate why free nations allowed these bad things to happen for all these years. Perhaps we were naive about China’s virulent strain of communism, or triumphalist after our victory in the Cold War, or cravenly capitalist, or hoodwinked by Beijing’s talk of a “peaceful rise.”

                            Whatever the reason – whatever the reason, today China is increasingly authoritarian at home, and more aggressive in its hostility to freedom everywhere else.

                            And President Trump has said: enough.

                            As Ambassador O’Brien explained so well, we have to keep in mind that the CCP regime is a Marxist-Leninist regime. General Secretary Xi Jinping is a true believer in a bankrupt totalitarian ideology.

                            It’s this ideology, it’s this ideology that informs his decades-long desire for global hegemony of Chinese communism. America can no longer ignore the fundamental political and ideological differences between our countries, just as the CCP has never ignored them.

                            My experience in the House Intelligence Committee, and then as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and my now two-plus years as America’s Secretary of State have led me to this central understanding:

                            That the only way – the only way to truly change communist China is to act not on the basis of what Chinese leaders say, but how they behave. And you can see American policy responding to this conclusion. President Reagan said that he dealt with the Soviet Union on the basis of “trust but verify.” When it comes to the CCP, I say we must distrust and verify. (Applause.)

                            We, the freedom-loving nations of the world, must induce China to change, just as President Nixon wanted. We must induce China to change in more creative and assertive ways, because Beijing’s actions threaten our people and our prosperity.

                            We must start by changing how our people and our partners perceive the Chinese Communist Party. We have to tell the truth. We can’t treat this incarnation of China as a normal country, just like any other.

                            We know that trading with China is not like trading with a normal, law-abiding nation. Beijing threatens international agreements as – treats international suggestions as – or agreements as suggestions, as conduits for global dominance.

                            But our approach can’t just be about getting tough. That’s unlikely to achieve the outcome that we desire. We must also engage and empower the Chinese people – a dynamic, freedom-loving people who are completely distinct from the Chinese Communist Party.

                            That begins with in-person diplomacy. (Applause.) I’ve met Chinese men and women of great talent and diligence wherever I go.

                            I’ve met with Uyghurs and ethnic Kazakhs who escaped Xinjiang’s concentration camps. I’ve talked with Hong Kong’s democracy leaders, from Cardinal Zen to Jimmy Lai. Two days ago in London, I met with Hong Kong freedom fighter Nathan Law.

                            And last month in my office, I heard the stories of Tiananmen Square survivors. One of them is here today.

                            Wang Dan was a key student who has never stopped fighting for freedom for the Chinese people. Mr. Wang, will you please stand so that we may recognize you? (Applause.)

                            Also with us today is the father of the Chinese democracy movement, Wei Jingsheng. He spent decades in Chinese labor camps for his advocacy. Mr. Wei, will you please stand? (Applause.)

                            I grew up and served my time in the Army during the Cold War. And if there is one thing I learned, communists almost always lie. The biggest lie that they tell is to think that they speak for 1.4 billion people who are surveilled, oppressed, and scared to speak out.

                            Quite the contrary. The CCP fears the Chinese people’s honest opinions more than any foe, and save for losing their own grip on power, they have reason – no reason to.

                            Now, this isn’t about containment. Don’t buy that. It’s about a complex new challenge that we’ve never faced before. The USSR was closed off from the free world. Communist China is already within our borders.

                            So we can’t face this challenge alone. The United Nations, NATO, the G7 countries, the G20, our combined economic, diplomatic, and military power is surely enough to meet this challenge if we direct it clearly and with great courage.

                            Maybe it’s time for a new grouping of like-minded nations, a new alliance of democracies.

                            We have the tools. I know we can do it. Now we need the will. To quote scripture, I ask is “our spirit willing but our flesh weak?”

                            If the free world doesn’t change – doesn’t change, communist China will surely change us. There can’t be a return to the past practices because they’re comfortable or because they’re convenient.

                            Indeed, Richard Nixon was right when he wrote in 1967 that “the world cannot be safe until China changes.” Now it’s up to us to heed his words.

                            Today the danger is clear.

                            And today the awakening is happening.

                            Today the free world must respond.

                            We can never go back to the past.

                            May God bless each of you.

                            May God bless the Chinese people.

                            And may God bless the people of the United States of America.

                            Thank you all.
                            Still think this show is only for the election ?

                            There is that strategic document they released recently about competition.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ain't much of a war when the US is in the driving seat. EVERYONE, including China, WANTS the US to open up her markets again. The US? Couldn't care less since they're the ones doing the buying.

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