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What's wrong with Hong Kong (and how to fix it)

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  • This is the best article I've seen on the suppression of freedom in Hong Kong, and how Taiwan is negotiating the dangerous path of its relations with China. The depth of understanding of both Hong Kong and Taiwan is astonishing, particularly for an author who casually mentions having to use an interpreter.

    Is Taiwan next?, by Sarah A. Topol,
    The New York Times Magazine, August 8, 2021


    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/04/m...wan-china.html



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    • Unfortunately can't access. Nonetheless, I can't see how anyone would think those 23 million in Taiwan would be happy to give up their freedoms in exchange for a version of slavery which is what Xi is all about.

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      • China Hands Hong Kong 500-Point To-Do List, SCMP Says

        by Jenni Marsh, Oct 12, 2021: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...list-scmp-says

        China’s top agency in Hong Kong handed the city’s leaders a to-do list with 500 policy demands, according to local media, evidence of Beijing’s growing footprint in the Asian financial hub.

        The Liaison Office assembled the list after consulting with local residents over the past few weeks, the South China Morning Post newspaper said Tuesday, citing a person familiar with the matter. The body planned to handle those tasks that relate to the functions of mainland authorities, such as cooperation with neighboring cities in southern China, as well as the reopening of the border.

        A spokesperson for Lam’s office declined to comment, saying they weren’t aware of the report.

        Staff for the Chinese agency, including Director Luo Huining, met with almost 4,000 local residents between Sept. 30 and Oct. 10, according to a statement posted on the office’s website Tuesday. Their mission was to convey “the central government’s care and love for Hong Kong, and in-depth understanding of the policy of benefiting Hong Kong and the people,” the office said.

        The outreach drive coincided with Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s delivery last week of an annual policy address, suggesting that the once low-profile body was becoming more active in governing the former British colony. Beijing has tightened its grip on Hong Kong, imposing a national security law in June 2020 that supersedes the city’s charter.

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        • Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
          Unfortunately can't access. Nonetheless, I can't see how anyone would think those 23 million in Taiwan would be happy to give up their freedoms in exchange for a version of slavery which is what Xi is all about.
          A sometimes workable workaround is to translate the website using Google Translate in an incognito tab in Chrome. This time it worked for me. Try the link.

          https://www-nytimes-com.translate.go...&_x_tr_pto=nui
          .
          .
          .

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          • Originally posted by DOR View Post


            Staff for the Chinese agency, including Director Luo Huining, met with almost 4,000 local residents between Sept. 30 and Oct. 10, according to a statement posted on the office’s website Tuesday. Their mission was to convey “the central government’s care and love for Hong Kong, and in-depth understanding of the policy of benefiting Hong Kong and the people,” the office said.
            Oh, how touching. Now I wonder just who these 4,000 local residents were? The average Joe or those with status? Pretty impressive meeting with 363 people each day.

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            • Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post

              Oh, how touching. Now I wonder just who these 4,000 local residents were? The average Joe or those with status? Pretty impressive meeting with 363 people each day.
              The Liaison Office does not suffer from a manpower shortage, and regularly holds "meet and greet" with housing estate residents. A single housing estate can easily have 4,000 residents.
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