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Switzerland's "deportation initiative"

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If the statistics quoted in other Swiss media can be believed, up to 18,000 foreign criminals a year would be deported if this initiative is successful

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  • drhuy
    replied
    Originally posted by kato View Post
    Except Germany tried to deport him but couldn't because Tunisia refused to take him. Until, gee, they suddenly provided a passport to deport him. Two days after the attack.

    Not always as simple as your protofascist propaganda makes it out to be.
    obviously you did NOT try hard or fast enough, did you? of course tunisia refused to take him, what kind of idiots would want to take back a future terrorist?

    and 12 people were killed on xmas holiday because of that. how can it be more simple than that?
    Last edited by drhuy; 06 Jan 17,, 08:06.

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  • kato
    replied
    Except Germany tried to deport him but couldn't because Tunisia refused to take him. Until, gee, they suddenly provided a passport to deport him. Two days after the attack.

    Not always as simple as your protofascist propaganda makes it out to be.

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  • drhuy
    replied
    in retrospect, if germany adopted the same "initiative", 12 families wouldnt have had lost their loved ones. but of course its not like merkel even cares.

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  • drhuy
    replied
    Originally posted by kato View Post
    What mass rape case in Köln?

    Out of 1182 accusations filed by people over the next six months claiming to be victims in Cologne on NYE 2015 only 0.42% (5) were for rape. And in 40% of these cases the alleged events were proven to not have taken place at all.
    funny when you dont dare to cover the "covered up" part but instead going with "yeah, there were rapes, just not 1000 rapes, ya know!".

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  • FORMBY
    replied
    Originally posted by kato View Post
    What mass rape case in Köln?

    Out of 1182 accusations filed by people over the next six months claiming to be victims in Cologne on NYE 2015 only 0.42% (5) were for rape. And in 40% of these cases the alleged events were proven to not have taken place at all.
    In that case, covering it up was a damned good thing to do.

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  • kato
    replied
    Originally posted by FORMBY View Post
    The mass rape case in Köln was covered up
    What mass rape case in Köln?

    Out of 1182 accusations filed by people over the next six months claiming to be victims in Cologne on NYE 2015 only 0.42% (5) were for rape. And in 40% of these cases the alleged events were proven to not have taken place at all.

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  • FORMBY
    replied
    Originally posted by Doktor View Post
    Greeks know the migrants came from Turkey, we know they cam from Greece, Serbs know they from here, Hungarians know...

    And yes, when we ask them, they say we came from Greece and before that from Turkey.
    The ones we've got refuse to tell us anything at all - and when they do open their mouths you can bet it's a lie.

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  • Doktor
    replied
    Greeks know the migrants came from Turkey, we know they cam from Greece, Serbs know they from here, Hungarians know...

    And yes, when we ask them, they say we came from Greece and before that from Turkey.

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  • FORMBY
    replied
    Originally posted by Doktor View Post
    Just send them to previous country.
    Is it that simple? What country was their "previous" one? I mean, how does one determine that? I know you're going to say "Ask the migrant" right? I'm not sure that knocking them back over the nearest border will work. However ....... hmmmmm. Right, since Merkel said what she wanted to say, and the waves came pouring over the frontiers, a few nations got wise. The mass rape case in Köln was covered up but a whistle-blower or 2 spoke up and within weeks the world knew what had happened. On the momentum of that incident, it was finally discovered that an identical thing had happened in Stockholm several months previously. Anyway, Sweden got wise and set up a border control on the Malmö rail line coming over from Denmark. The Danes were not pleased because the vast majority of migrants were only using Denmark as a bridge to get to Sweden. Overnight Denmark was host to stay-put masses of unwilling migrants. The upshot is that the border control (to this day) is still only from Denmark to Sweden. The opposite direction is still fully open. So yeah, I guess we could dump them on the Danish side of the border. But I am sure it would cause a great stir in the EU .... particularly in Copenhagen! I'll just tell the Danes that you said we should 'Just send them to previous country', and maybe they'll understand. Ho-ho!

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  • Doktor
    replied
    Just send them to previous country.

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  • FORMBY
    replied
    Originally posted by zraver View Post
    how does deporting aliens who commit crimes break international or EU law?
    That's what I want to know. "Deportation". We all know what it means. We've heard it before. A national of some other country is deported for legal reasons, often criminal behaviour, right? Anyway, I don't know if the Swiss suddenly experienced a revelation, but the idea of deporting immigrants because of criminal behaviour is being discussed all over Europe. Our own Jimmie Åkesson's SD Party has it high on their list of actions to implement as soon as (or if) they take top seat in government - 2018 one hopes!

    I think the answer to our question lies with the fact that most of these criminal-committing immigrants are "stateless". Actually, I think most of them aren't really stateless it's just that they've either tossed out their passports on the way over or are claiming to have come from a country (falsely) that more easily can/could be awarded refugee status. Why shit, they've even lied about their name and age! Anyway, that makes it more difficult to deport them to..... to where? I don't think the Australian Nullarbor is keen on taking any more of them. Even if they did, what would these people be called? 'POM's won't do any longer.

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  • kato
    replied
    illegal entry as in illegal border crossing - not breaking and entering.

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  • Doktor
    replied
    But we exclude breaking and entering because why?

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  • kato
    replied
    There were about 30,000 people convicted for crimes last year in Switzerland. The above list (i.e. crimes committed by foreigners) amounts to about 40% of that, although half of that is just "illegal entry" and most of the rest is bog standard breaking and entering.

    If we subtract illegal entry we end up at about 25% of all other crimes being committed by foreigners. The percentage share of foreigners among the Swiss population is - surprise, surprise - the exact same 25%.

    As for "a lot", the above - sans illegal entry - amount to one criminal convicted per 347 people. In Germany the rate is three times higher at around one conviction per 110 people. This includes - in both cases - any convictions, including if you only got a fine of a few hundred bucks.

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