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Atlas Shrugged - Francisco d'Anconia's thoughts on money

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
    If you feel the need, fing a nice summary with plenty of quotes & have the actual book next to you to dip into & see if you agree with the summary.
    That's why i recommended David Harvey's course in the 'Reading Marx' thread. Just the audio files alone are interesting.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ArmchairGeneral View Post
      Got maybe 10 pages in to that one. Then glanced at about every 20th page, and determined that it was unreadable. This was before I realized I am incapable of reading through any sort of utopian novel. OTOH, I am a total sucker for dystopian books.
      What this says about my personality, I'm not sure. Maybe I should switch back to my old Dalrymple apocalyptic thought sig again.
      Lately I've been searching the Google Books digitized library (May God bless them for it!) and downloading "early" Christian Apocalyptic books. Apparently Jesus came back around 1654, and nobody noticed.



      I would like to make an attempt on Das Kapital. I've heard Marx actually shows some understanding of economics- distorted, but more insightful than most contemporaries.
      VERY dense read. Some of it actually did make sense to me at the time, But I didn't have even a basic grasp on econ. back then. Our schools, IMHO, don't do well at teaching that.
      sigpicUSS North Dakota

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
        AG,

        My tongue was firmly planted in my cheek, but not as firmly as I wished it was. There is certainly a long & wide streak of unreadability in German philosophy, but not everyone was guilty.
        Ah. Mebbe I need my snark-o-meter recalibrated. I find most German intellectual writing to be extremely hard going, actually.
        I enjoy being wrong too much to change my mind.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 2DREZQ View Post
          Lately I've been searching the Google Books digitized library (May God bless them for it!) and downloading "early" Christian Apocalyptic books. Apparently Jesus came back around 1654, and nobody noticed.
          How awkward. Guess that throws a spanner in the works for Christianity...especially the 'end times' folk.
          sigpic

          Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ArmchairGeneral View Post
            Ah. Mebbe I need my snark-o-meter recalibrated. I find most German intellectual writing to be extremely hard going, actually.
            More joke than snark (but I can be a subtle bastard ;)). If it makes you feel any better pretty much everybody finds German intellectual writing hard going - Germans included.

            Back in the late 80s I was a student at one of the large universities in Australia. it had a large & pretty well credentialled Pol Sci faculty, but they actually had to hire in a guy who was an expert on 'Critical Theory' (Frankfurt School) because no one else on staff (well...maybe one other guy) had an in depth understanding. Doesn't leave much hope for the rest of us.
            sigpic

            Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 2DREZQ View Post
              Lately I've been searching the Google Books digitized library (May God bless them for it!) and downloading "early" Christian Apocalyptic books. Apparently Jesus came back around 1654, and nobody noticed.
              .
              2DREZQ
              I'd love to read about that, can you give me the links to or names of those books? (I am not questioning your statement, I just want to know more about them). I agree, Google books, and project Gutenburg are wonderful, I have many of their books in my virtual library
              Last edited by USSWisconsin; 31 Oct 10,, 21:18.
              sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
              If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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              • #22
                Fountainhead is much more enjoyable as a novel and witnessing the struggle of a honest and uncompromising man against the world eager to make compromises. Most of the characters are not so one dimensional. In fact, the only one dimensional characters are the protagonist, the architect, and to a lesser extent, the antagonist, the editorial columnist. The most complicated character was the industrialist who strive to make it big. There were some themes that I disagree as such as the architect telling his former friend, another architect who rode on the coattails of him, that it was too late to change. It is never too late to change till the day you die.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by USSWisconsin View Post
                  2DREZQ
                  I'd love to read about that, can you give me the links to or names of those books? (I am not questioning your statement, I just want to know more about them). I agree, Google books, and project Gutenburg are wonderful, I have many of their books in my virtual library
                  Knowledge of the times pub.1654

                  just getting into it now.
                  sigpicUSS North Dakota

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by 2DREZQ View Post
                    Knowledge of the times pub.1654

                    just getting into it now.
                    Thank You
                    sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
                    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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                    • #25
                      it'd be good for students if they read Ayn Rand and Karl Marx side by side, with an illustration of the society each lived in.

                      what each get wrong is that money is neither inherently good or evil, it just -is-. it's a tool, or more accurately, it's merely distilled energy. i suspect each of them realized this in their hearts of hearts, but liked to use the terminology of good and evil the way we tend to do today-- to shut down debate.
                      There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

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                      • #26
                        Originally Posted by 2DREZQ
                        Lately I've been searching the Google Books digitized library (May God bless them for it!) and downloading "early" Christian Apocalyptic books. Apparently Jesus came back around 1654, and nobody noticed.



                        I managed to read through this, inspite of the middle english - almost like a code. My impression is the author was using earlier writings (primarily the Bible) to calculate the time of the second coming of Christ, which he predicted around 1656 (pg 328), a couple years after the publication of his book. It is very well done for the time I was impressed by the clarity of the arguments and orgainization, including tables and references. The Gutenberg type and ownership plaque in the front of the book added to the experience.
                        Last edited by USSWisconsin; 04 Nov 10,, 01:11.
                        sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
                        If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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                        • #27
                          "So you think that money is the root of all evil?" said Francisco d'Anconia.
                          Been a long time since I read any Ayn Rand. Back then it appealed to a hunger for reason.

                          Of course, Rand is right about money's utility in commerce. But unfortunately her entire exposition is based on an erroneous reading of the saying "money is the root of all evil".

                          It should read: "The love of money is the root of all evil. And according to Wiki the original saying in its Greek form, which is attributed to Jesus, is "The love of money is the root of all sorts of evil." Pretty hard to argue against that.
                          To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

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