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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    Buck,

    1. With the limited reserve clause, you have the ability to get some mileage out of folks and then potentially gain some leverage through the ability to trade folks prior to when they can walk through free agency. The question to ask with regards to this is if the A's spent the same amount of money (remember, they are a small market and so they can't compete in terms of salary) without using their stat-heads, could they field teams that do as well consistently?

    2. Doing well over 162 games vs. a five or seven game series is different. Think about a more extreme example - would you get upsets by #15 seeds in the NCAA tournament over a 3-game series? 5-game series? 20-game series? The more games, then the less chance of the weaker team winning. Of course, shorter series and the thrill of the upset/unknown is part of what attracts folks to sports.

    What about if you have the money and stats? 60 Minutes did a piece on Bill James and the BoSox last night.

    CBS News Video - Top Stories and Video News Clips at CBSNews.com
    The Red Sox' Stat Man And The Numbers Game, Bill James Tells 60 Minutes Mets' David Wright Would Be A Top Pick On His Dream Team - CBS News

    As an interesting aside, Beane has been going after high school players again: Newmark's Door:

    I think the publishing of Moneyball was a strategic move to reduce the pressure on the price of high school prospects (you can see my comment to the post).
    I isee your point about the Moneyball.

    I guess I didn't express my point well which was supported by the 60 MInutes piece...namely, evaluation of talent these days is meaningless if you don't have the money to keep them.

    The have had money but, unitl recently, not like the Yankees (spit, spit). To try to overcome that the old Sox ownership and GM raided and sold out the farm system.

    New ownership comes in and changes 2 things.

    1. They understand to make money you have to spend money.

    2. To survive you buy free agents; to thrive you build a strong farm system.


    The smartest thing John Henry and company did was hire Theo Epstein...and then they bankrolled him. They also fixed up Fenway...this helped draw the fans. (Sidenote: When Henry bought the team, the Red Sox were the only team in MLB which owned their own ballpark...which meant they had to pay taxes and pay for upkeep)

    Epstein made some great personnel decisions (see trading Garciaparra; Ortiz, Beckett and that Schilling Guy) and a few bad ones. (Edgar Rentaria comes to mind). But having that shiny trophy bought him the time to really build the team. And winning the 2004 World Series is allowing the Red Sox to print money on Yawkey Way!

    This allowed Epstein and CO to draft smart and not give a way the farm on Johann Santanna and others. The young guns (Youk, Lester, Bucholz, Ellesbury, Papelbon) all will have long careers...and probably will stay with Boston.


    Moneyball made the A's competititve but it did not make them Champions. The Sox had to find a way compete with New York...and they did. And with that came the money to build.

    And as for closers not being worth it?

    I give you OCT 2003 and Aaron "bleeping" Boone v Tim Wakefield versus 2004 and Ketih "That's All" Foulke...and that Papelbon kid sure can dance!

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Shek

    Bill Simmons is The Sports Guiy on ESPN.com Page 2...used to be The Boston Sports Guy.

    And as for Moneyball...I've read it and at the end fo the day I ask myself 2 questions. 1. How many of those great prospects stay with the Oakland A's? Answer: Almost none...they can't afford them.

    2. How many World Series or AL penants have the A's won since Billy Beane became their GM?
    Buck,

    1. With the limited reserve clause, you have the ability to get some mileage out of folks and then potentially gain some leverage through the ability to trade folks prior to when they can walk through free agency. The question to ask with regards to this is if the A's spent the same amount of money (remember, they are a small market and so they can't compete in terms of salary) without using their stat-heads, could they field teams that do as well consistently?

    2. Doing well over 162 games vs. a five or seven game series is different. Think about a more extreme example - would you get upsets by #15 seeds in the NCAA tournament over a 3-game series? 5-game series? 20-game series? The more games, then the less chance of the weaker team winning. Of course, shorter series and the thrill of the upset/unknown is part of what attracts folks to sports.

    What about if you have the money and stats? 60 Minutes did a piece on Bill James and the BoSox last night.

    CBS News Video - Top Stories and Video News Clips at CBSNews.com
    The Red Sox' Stat Man And The Numbers Game, Bill James Tells 60 Minutes Mets' David Wright Would Be A Top Pick On His Dream Team - CBS News

    As an interesting aside, Beane has been going after high school players again: Newmark's Door:

    I think the publishing of Moneyball was a strategic move to reduce the pressure on the price of high school prospects (you can see my comment to the post).

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    Never heard of him. However, I was a huge sports fan growing up, and then became too busy in college and afterwards to watch/read a whole bunch of sports except for the major sporting events. I'm going to teach a sports econ course next year spring semester, and so now I have an excuse to do some "research" :))

    [wife]Stop watching the football game[/wife]

    [me]Sorry, honey, but I'm doing some research for class[/me]
    Shek

    Bill Simmons is The Sports Guiy on ESPN.com Page 2...used to be The Boston Sports Guy.

    And as for Moneyball...I've read it and at the end fo the day I ask myself 2 questions. 1. How many of those great prospects stay with the Oakland A's? Answer: Almost none...they can't afford them.

    2. How many World Series or AL penants have the A's won since Billy Beane became their GM?

    Leave a comment:


  • 2DREZQ
    replied
    Before reading anything else:

    BASIC ECONOMICS: A COMMONSENSE GUIDE TO THE ECONOMY
    &
    APPLIED ECONOMICS: THINKING BEYOND STAGE ONE
    Both by Thomas Sowell

    after that, you might want to try THE AGE OF TURBULENCE
    by Alan Greenspan

    It seems just a bit self-serving, but still, how can you pass up the insider view from this guy?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Originally posted by rj1 View Post
    You strike me as the type of guy that would be a big Bill Simmons fan. Personally, I love his work.
    Never heard of him. However, I was a huge sports fan growing up, and then became too busy in college and afterwards to watch/read a whole bunch of sports except for the major sporting events. I'm going to teach a sports econ course next year spring semester, and so now I have an excuse to do some "research" :))

    [wife]Stop watching the football game[/wife]

    [me]Sorry, honey, but I'm doing some research for class[/me]

    Leave a comment:


  • rj1
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    rj1,

    Thanks, this blog is one of the three main sports econ blogs out there. There are actually about eight authors that contribute to it, which is why is has the biggest breadth of topics. The other two main ones are Sabernomics» Economic Thinking about Baseball, which focuses mostly on baseball, and the Wages of Wins Journal, which is mostly basketball-centric.

    If you're looking for a site that has a lot of sports econ type stats, Rodney Fort's webpage is a good one to go to.

    You strike me as the type of guy that would be a big Bill Simmons fan. Personally, I love his work.
    Last edited by rj1; 28 Mar 08,, 05:35.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Originally posted by rj1 View Post
    If you're into sports economics, I recommend this college professor's blog on it. Pretty good, he gets mentioned in articles linking sports with money (especially public stadium funding).
    The Sports Economist
    rj1,

    Thanks, this blog is one of the three main sports econ blogs out there. There are actually about eight authors that contribute to it, which is why is has the biggest breadth of topics. The other two main ones are Sabernomics» Economic Thinking about Baseball, which focuses mostly on baseball, and the Wages of Wins Journal, which is mostly basketball-centric.

    If you're looking for a site that has a lot of sports econ type stats, Rodney Fort's webpage is a good one to go to.

    Leave a comment:


  • rj1
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    Here's another recommend economics reading. It's another sports economics book that looks at a few sports, although the last half of the book focuses on basketball and why Allen Iverson is overpaid, the Lakers were smart in keeping Kobe, that MJ is the best player in the modern era, and why Kevin Garnett would be a great acquisition (quite prescient).

    Here are links to the book and the authors' blog:

    Amazon.com: The Wages of Wins: Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport (Stanford Business Books): David Berri,Martin Schmidt,Stacey Brook: Books

    The Wages of Wins Journal
    If you're into sports economics, I recommend this college professor's blog on it. Pretty good, he gets mentioned in articles linking sports with money (especially public stadium funding).
    The Sports Economist

    Bit of a contrarian currently, so for the real economy, I recommend The Big Picture
    Last edited by rj1; 28 Mar 08,, 05:20.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Here's another recommend economics reading. It's another sports economics book that looks at a few sports, although the last half of the book focuses on basketball and why Allen Iverson is overpaid, the Lakers were smart in keeping Kobe, that MJ is the best player in the modern era, and why Kevin Garnett would be a great acquisition (quite prescient).

    Here are links to the book and the authors' blog:

    Amazon.com: The Wages of Wins: Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport (Stanford Business Books): David Berri,Martin Schmidt,Stacey Brook: Books

    The Wages of Wins Journal

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    The following two books are a great and fun survey of economics principles and concepts by looking at the real world. Not a single graph or equation to be found, so you won't get bogged down in equations.

    Amazon.com: The Undercover Economist: Exposing Why the Rich Are Rich, Why the Poor Are Poor--And Why You Can Never Buy a Decent Used Car!: Books: Tim Harford

    Amazon.com: Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science: Books: Charles Wheelan

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    The next recommended book is a very short read (just over 110 pages) that can be done in a night.

    Amazon.com: The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protection (3rd Edition): Books: Russell Roberts

    The book lays out very simply why free trade benefits nations as a whole and exposes the fallacious reasoning behind political arguments for protectionism.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Originally posted by gunnut View Post
    What I want to know is if he can explain the whole concept of "switch hitting." Personally, I think it's a bunch of superstition.
    Gunnut,

    Switch hitting is real. Having stopped playing at the junior high level, pitchers weren't throwing curve balls yet, but that is supposedly the biggest difference, as batting against an opposite handed pitcher will produce a ball curving into your hitting zone as opposed to away from you. It also adds some game theory into short-relief pitching situations. With the bases loaded and 2 outs, you may bring in a relief pitcher with a higher ERA if the batter is hits from the same side of the plate as the pitcher pitches (i.e, match up a right-handed batter and a right-handed pitcher). However, I don't have the stats on this. I'll have to try downloading the data at the end of the summer and run the stats.

    Leave a comment:


  • GVChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    I showed the video towards the end of the semester, and most everyone loved it. Here's the website for the comedian economist. Also, hope you don't mind, but I'm going to replace your YouTube link to the video with the higher quality video link from Dr. Bauman's website.

    The world's first and only stand-up economist
    Works for me

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    I showed the video towards the end of the semester, and most everyone loved it. Here's the website for the comedian economist. Also, hope you don't mind, but I'm going to replace your YouTube link to the video with the higher quality video link from Dr. Bauman's website.

    The world's first and only stand-up economist

    Leave a comment:


  • GVChamp
    replied
    http://www.standupeconomist.com/clips/AIR_Yoram_med.mp4
    Shek, this has no intellectual value, but it is too hilarious to not go in this thread.
    It's Economics comedy
    Last edited by Shek; 29 Jun 07,, 19:11.

    Leave a comment:

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