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  • Supplying LNG to Europe

    Originally posted by AP_News

    First floating LNG terminal arrives at German port
    23 November 2022

    BERLIN (AP) — The first of several ships that will serve as floating terminals to receive liquefied natural gas imports in Germany arrived Wednesday off the Baltic Sea port of Mukran.

    In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Germany has scrambled to secure alternative sources of gas to replace Russian supplies, on which the country had long relied.

    The 280-meter-long (918-feet-long) Neptune is due to begin operation in nearby Lubmin on Dec. 1.

    Similar so-called floating storage and regasification units are scheduled to arrive at the North Sea ports of Wilhelmshaven and Brunsbuettel later this year.

    Along with other measures taken by the government — such as reviving mothballed coal and oil-fired power plants and extending the lifetime of its three remaining nuclear reactors — “this winter Germany’s energy security seems assured,” Chancellor Olaf Scholz told lawmakers Wednesday.

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    The 'Neptune' vessel approaches the harbor of Mukran, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022. The first of several ships that will serve as floating terminals to receive liquefied natural gas imports in Germany have arrived off the Baltic Sea port of Mukran. In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Germany has scrambled to secure alternative sources of gas to replace Russian supplies, on which the country had long relied. (Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP)
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  • #2
    Originally posted by DW_News
    17 December 2022
    Germany opens new LNG terminal in record time to replace Russian gas
    (04 min, 47 sec)

    Germany is one step closer to ending its reliance on Russian gas after a huge ship containing liquified natural gas arrived at the port of Wilhelmshaven on the North Sea. It is a key part of the infrastructure that will allow the processing of the fuel to take place. Germany is counting on LNG as an alternative to the natural gas it used to receive via pipeline from Russia.
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    • #3
      I did see on the news here, that this is just the first of around half a dozen terminals that Germany is constructing.
      I think that NG terminals will soon be a common sight, up and down the Atlantic seaboard.
      Well, anything that helps get Putin's steel boot of the neck of Europe's energy needs, gets my vote.
      As for his Nord Stream pipelines?
      They were built by bottom-feeders, now they will become home to their relatives!!!

      When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow. - Anais Nin

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Amled View Post
        I did see on the news here, that this is just the first of around half a dozen terminals that Germany is constructing.
        The government is having five constructed, the sixth is commercial. Half of them need another year for completion since gas pipelines from those ports have to be built first. Mukran and Lubmin effectively use Nord Stream infrastructure for landing the gas btw.

        Frankly though? All six terminals together, once complete, are planned to only have a capacity of "minimum 30 billion m³ gas per year" (after regasification). For reference, that's about one quarter of what Nord Stream could transport, or one third of what Germany alone uses per year. It is therefore not a viable replacement, and the political-economical problems of importing from countries like Qatar or the USA are only starting to show themselves.
        Last edited by kato; 18 Dec 22,, 23:38.

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        • #5
          This type of conversion might be difficult to sell in Germany, but there it is.

          Originally posted by US_Dept_of_Energy_Office_of_Nuclear_Energy
          13 September 2022

          DOE Report Finds Hundreds of Retiring Coal Plant Sites Could Convert to Nuclear

          WASHINGTON, D.C.— The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a report showing that hundreds of U.S. coal power plant sites could convert to nuclear power plant sites, adding new jobs, increasing economic benefit, and significantly improving environmental conditions. This coal-to-nuclear transition could add a substantial amount of clean electricity to the grid, helping the U.S. reach its net-zero emissions goals by 2050.

          The study investigated the benefits and challenges of converting retiring coal plant sites into nuclear plant sites. After screening recently retired and active coal plant sites, the study team identified 157 retired coal plant sites and 237 operating coal plant sites as potential candidates for a coal-to-nuclear transition. Of these sites, the team found that 80% are good candidates to host advanced reactors smaller than the gigawatt scale.

          A coal to nuclear transition could significantly improve air quality in communities around the country. The case study found that greenhouse gas emissions in a region could fall by 86% when nuclear power plants replace large coal plants, which is equivalent to taking more than 500,000 gasoline-powered passenger vehicles off the roads.

          It could also increase employment and economic activity within those communities. When a large coal plant is replaced by a nuclear power plant of equivalent size, the study found that jobs in the region could increase by more than 650 permanent positions. Based the case study in the report, long-term job impacts could lead to additional annual economic activity of $275 million, implying an increase of 92% tax revenue for the local county when compared to the operating coal power.

          “This is an important opportunity to help communities around the country preserve jobs, increase tax revenue, and improve air quality,” said Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dr. Kathryn Huff. “As we move to a clean energy future, we need to deliver place-based solutions and ensure an equitable energy transition that does not leave communities behind.”

          The reuse of coal infrastructure for advanced nuclear reactors could also reduce costs for developing new nuclear technology, saving from 15% to 35% in construction costs. Coal-to-nuclear transitions could save millions of dollars by reusing the coal plant’s electrical equipment (e.g., transmission lines, switchyards), cooling ponds or towers, and civil infrastructure such as roads and office buildings.

          Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted the study, sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy.

          Read the full report here.

          ###

          Office of Nuclear Energy
          1000 Independence Ave. SW
          Washington DC 20585
          202-586-5000


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          • #6
            Originally posted by JRT View Post
            This type of conversion might be difficult to sell in Germany, but there it is.
            Actually the future in Europe seems to be the opposite way. We're actually bringing coal plants back online now. En masse since November, after operating companies built up the legally required coal reserves over previous months.

            Started back in August because France could no longer export electricity (and became a net importer) because half its nuclear plants had to go offline - due to global warming. In July France produced less electricity in nuclear plants than at any time in the past 8 years.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kato View Post
              ...because France could no longer export electricity (and became a net importer) because half its nuclear plants had to go offline - due to global warming. In July France produced less electricity in nuclear plants than at any time in the past 8 years.
              There is a headache to be found in thinking about that one.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by euronews
                28 December 2022
                Finland opens floating liquified natural gas terminal to replace Russian supply
                (01 min, 10 sec)

                Like many countries in Europe, Finland is looking to liquified natural gas to replace the main pipeline gas it used to receive from Russia.

                The Nordic country's first floating liquefied natural gas terminal was moored on Wednesday at the southern port of Inkoo.

                The massive 291-metre-long and 43-metre-wide offshore support vessel Exemplar, which sailed to the Baltic Sea from Gibraltar earlier in December, has a capacity of 68,000 tons of LNG. It is scheduled to be in operation from next year.

                FSRU Exemplar, owned by the US company Excelerate Energy Inc., will ensure the future availability of gas in Finland. It will replace supplies previously imported from Russia, the state-owned Gasgrid Finland said, calling the move "historic".

                “Finland will permanently phase out its dependency on Russian gas and will greatly improve society’s security of supply,” Gasgrid Finland CEO Olli Sipilä said.

                ”The aim is that the terminal’s customers will begin to distribute gas to meet the needs of Finnish industry, energy production, and households from mid-January 2023 onwards.”

                The vessel will reconvert LNG to gas which will then be fed into the Finnish network for distribution. The arrival of the Exemplar will also enable gas deliveries to the Baltic states — Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania — and possibly also to Poland through the undersea Balticconnector pipeline between Finland and Estonia that runs near Inkoo.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DW_News
                  29 December 2022
                  European natural gas prices drop back to pre-Ukraine war levels
                  (05 min, 02 sec)

                  European natural gas prices have fallen to levels last recorded before Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February. Warmer weather helps the EU to preserve its reserves.
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                  • #10
                    Putin remains a genius of strategy....
                    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                    Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                      Putin remains a genius of strategy....
                      Hmm, Hmm ... I believe the proper term of address is 'Putin the Great' actually. Details like this are important and should not be forgotten.
                      If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

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