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  • Originally posted by Bigfella View Post

    Not that lucky if you happen to live here.
    I know, and that is why I put ahem there as they could all live in Canada...

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
      Precisely. Do the math.
      10 Shelias on the prowl with 1 Peter cowering in his mancave trying to scotch up couirage to venture out for food shopping.

      Chimo

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
        10 Shelias on the prowl with 1 Peter cowering in his mancave trying to scotch up couirage to venture out for food shopping.
        Fortunately they tend not to attack unless provoked - like most of our deadly creatures. Shopping is fine. Dating is bloodsport.
        sigpic

        Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

        Comment


        • Exclusive: Russia starts stripping jetliners for parts as sanctions bite

          (This content was produced in Russia, where the law restricts coverage of Russian military operations in Ukraine)

          MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian airlines, including state-controlled Aeroflot, are stripping jetliners to secure spare parts they can no longer buy abroad because of Western sanctions, four industry sources told Reuters.

          The steps are in line with advice Russia's government provided in June http://static.government.ru/media/ac...2206270017.pdf for airlines to use some aircraft for parts to ensure the remainder of foreign-built planes can continue flying at least through 2025.

          Sanctions imposed on Russia after it sent its troops into Ukraine in late February have prevented its airlines from obtaining spare parts or undergoing maintenance in the West.

          Aviation experts have said that Russian airlines would be likely to start taking parts from their planes to keep them airworthy, but these are the first detailed examples.

          At least one Russian-made Sukhoi Superjet 100 and an Airbus A350, both operated by Aeroflot, are currently grounded and being disassembled, one source familiar with the matter said.

          The source declined to be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue.

          The Airbus A350 is almost brand new, the source said.

          Most of Russia's fleet of aircraft consists of Western passenger jets.

          Equipment was being taken from a couple of Aeroflot's Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s, as the carrier needs more spare parts from those models for its other Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s, the source said.

          The Russian Ministry of Transport and Aeroflot did not reply to requests for comment.

          'MATTER OF TIME'

          Russian-assembled Sukhoi Superjets are also heavily dependent on foreign parts. An engine has already been removed from one Superjet to allow another Superjet to continue flying, the first source said.

          To be sure, engines are frequently swapped between aircraft and are usually supplied under separate contracts, industry experts said. They are not considered part of the core airframe.

          It is "only a matter of time" before Russia-based planes are cannibalised, a Western aviation industry source said.

          Newer generations of jets - A320neo, A350 and Boeing 737 MAX and 787 - have technology that has to be constantly updated.

          Within a year of the sanctions coming into effect, it will be a "challenge" to keep modern jets in service even for Russia's highly developed and competent engineering base, Western sources have said.

          The practice of removing parts to keep another plane flying is commonly known as turning the disused planes into "Christmas trees". Although relatively rare, it is most often linked to financial difficulties and has never happened on the same scale as the widespread reshuffle being predicted in Russia in order to address the impact of sanctions.

          Jetliners may be made operational again provided parts taken away are put back, though this would not necessarily reconstitute the traceability needed for jets to re-enter global markets.

          Many parts have a limited life that must be logged.

          Nearly 80% of Aeroflot's fleet consists of Boeings and Airbuses - it has 134 Boeings and 146 Airbuses, along with nearly 80 Russia-made Sukhoi Superjet-100 planes as of end last year, based on the latest data available.

          According to Reuters calculations based on data from Flightradar24, some 50 Aeroflot planes – or 15% of its fleet, including jets stranded by sanctions - have not taken off since late July.

          Three out of seven Airbus A350s operated by Aeroflot, including one now being used for parts, did not take off for around three months, the Flightradar24 data shows.

          Russian carriers flying fewer routes due to Western sanctions means there are unused jets grounded that can be stripped, a second industry source said.

          "Western manufacturers understand that almost all Superjets are being operated in Russia," said Oleg Panteleev, head of the Aviaport aviation think-tank. "You can simply stop producing and shipping spare parts - and it will hurt."

          DISMANTLING

          The Russian aviation industry's development plan up to 2030 estimated that Russia could face the biggest challenges with A350 and Bombardier Q series as maintenance on them is carried out overseas.

          The Russian government's advice envisages "partial dismantling of a certain parts of the aircraft fleet", which would keep two thirds of the foreign fleet operational by end-2025.

          The main challenge will be keeping engines and sophisticated electronic equipment in working order, said Panteleev.

          "It will be hard to get them repaired," he said.

          Aeroflot, once among the world's top airlines but now reliant on state support, experienced a 22% fall in traffic in the second quarter of this year from a year ago, the company's data showed, after sanctions prevented it from flying to most Western destinations.

          Securing supplies from countries which have not imposed sanctions on Russia is unlikely to help, as companies from Asia and the Middle East fear a risk of secondary sanctions against them by Western governments, the sources said.

          "Each single part has its own (unique) number and if the documents will have a Russian airline as the final buyer, then no one would agree to supply, neither China nor Dubai," the first source said, adding that all parts have to be made known to Boeing and Airbus before they are supplied to the end-user.
          ________
          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

          Comment


          • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
            Exclusive: Russia starts stripping jetliners for parts as sanctions bite

            (This content was produced in Russia, where the law restricts coverage of Russian military operations in Ukraine)

            MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian airlines, including state-controlled Aeroflot, are stripping jetliners to secure spare parts they can no longer buy abroad because of Western sanctions, four industry sources told Reuters.

            The steps are in line with advice Russia's government provided in June http://static.government.ru/media/ac...2206270017.pdf for airlines to use some aircraft for parts to ensure the remainder of foreign-built planes can continue flying at least through 2025.

            Sanctions imposed on Russia after it sent its troops into Ukraine in late February have prevented its airlines from obtaining spare parts or undergoing maintenance in the West.

            Aviation experts have said that Russian airlines would be likely to start taking parts from their planes to keep them airworthy, but these are the first detailed examples.

            At least one Russian-made Sukhoi Superjet 100 and an Airbus A350, both operated by Aeroflot, are currently grounded and being disassembled, one source familiar with the matter said.

            The source declined to be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue.

            The Airbus A350 is almost brand new, the source said.

            Most of Russia's fleet of aircraft consists of Western passenger jets.

            Equipment was being taken from a couple of Aeroflot's Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s, as the carrier needs more spare parts from those models for its other Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s, the source said.

            The Russian Ministry of Transport and Aeroflot did not reply to requests for comment.

            'MATTER OF TIME'

            Russian-assembled Sukhoi Superjets are also heavily dependent on foreign parts. An engine has already been removed from one Superjet to allow another Superjet to continue flying, the first source said.

            To be sure, engines are frequently swapped between aircraft and are usually supplied under separate contracts, industry experts said. They are not considered part of the core airframe.

            It is "only a matter of time" before Russia-based planes are cannibalised, a Western aviation industry source said.

            Newer generations of jets - A320neo, A350 and Boeing 737 MAX and 787 - have technology that has to be constantly updated.

            Within a year of the sanctions coming into effect, it will be a "challenge" to keep modern jets in service even for Russia's highly developed and competent engineering base, Western sources have said.

            The practice of removing parts to keep another plane flying is commonly known as turning the disused planes into "Christmas trees". Although relatively rare, it is most often linked to financial difficulties and has never happened on the same scale as the widespread reshuffle being predicted in Russia in order to address the impact of sanctions.

            Jetliners may be made operational again provided parts taken away are put back, though this would not necessarily reconstitute the traceability needed for jets to re-enter global markets.

            Many parts have a limited life that must be logged.

            Nearly 80% of Aeroflot's fleet consists of Boeings and Airbuses - it has 134 Boeings and 146 Airbuses, along with nearly 80 Russia-made Sukhoi Superjet-100 planes as of end last year, based on the latest data available.

            According to Reuters calculations based on data from Flightradar24, some 50 Aeroflot planes – or 15% of its fleet, including jets stranded by sanctions - have not taken off since late July.

            Three out of seven Airbus A350s operated by Aeroflot, including one now being used for parts, did not take off for around three months, the Flightradar24 data shows.

            Russian carriers flying fewer routes due to Western sanctions means there are unused jets grounded that can be stripped, a second industry source said.

            "Western manufacturers understand that almost all Superjets are being operated in Russia," said Oleg Panteleev, head of the Aviaport aviation think-tank. "You can simply stop producing and shipping spare parts - and it will hurt."

            DISMANTLING

            The Russian aviation industry's development plan up to 2030 estimated that Russia could face the biggest challenges with A350 and Bombardier Q series as maintenance on them is carried out overseas.

            The Russian government's advice envisages "partial dismantling of a certain parts of the aircraft fleet", which would keep two thirds of the foreign fleet operational by end-2025.

            The main challenge will be keeping engines and sophisticated electronic equipment in working order, said Panteleev.

            "It will be hard to get them repaired," he said.

            Aeroflot, once among the world's top airlines but now reliant on state support, experienced a 22% fall in traffic in the second quarter of this year from a year ago, the company's data showed, after sanctions prevented it from flying to most Western destinations.

            Securing supplies from countries which have not imposed sanctions on Russia is unlikely to help, as companies from Asia and the Middle East fear a risk of secondary sanctions against them by Western governments, the sources said.

            "Each single part has its own (unique) number and if the documents will have a Russian airline as the final buyer, then no one would agree to supply, neither China nor Dubai," the first source said, adding that all parts have to be made known to Boeing and Airbus before they are supplied to the end-user.
            ________
            Kind of raise an issue...aren't these aircraft all leased and actually belong to a separate company...I believe in the Republic of Ireland.

            I wonder what the legality issues will be...and the future leasing arrangements and interest on loans will become.
            “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
            Mark Twain

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

              Kind of raise an issue...aren't these aircraft all leased and actually belong to a separate company...I believe in the Republic of Ireland.

              I wonder what the legality issues will be...and the future leasing arrangements and interest on loans will become.
              If Russia isn't still making lease payments (and I don't think they are) then the leasing firms and the airline manufacturers behind them are talking a big hit. (That or their insurers are.) Either way you can pretty much assume the Russian airline industry is screwed for the next couple of years barring a negotiated settlement post a peace deal with Ukraine. Also I imagine similar but less obvious constraints are going to start hitting the domestic vehicle market as well, assuming they aren't hitting already. New vehicle production has effectively ceased but the issue remains spare parts. If you bought a new car just before the war broke out and sanctions were imposed your probably OK but what about all the major corporate and public service agencies out there with large fleets of aging commercial transports or the poorer Russian who owns a 5 or 6 year old car that's been flogged to death on bad Russian Roads?
              Last edited by Monash; 11 Aug 22,, 03:22.
              If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

              Comment


              • I'm pretty sure Russia just seized the aircraft in response to EU sanctions. Maybe they will give them back after....if there is anything left to give back....maybe not. Can't see anyone rushing to lease them more in future. Strictly cash & carry from now on.
                sigpic

                Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

                Comment


                • Prigozhin may have been HIMARS-arized.... @Rlee has a thread on a HIMARS strike near Popsana on a Wagner group HQ where he was seen. Fingers crossed he is explaining himself to the devil.

                  Comment


                  • 20 minute program by DW news on the true current state of the Russian economy. Very interesting.

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzvR958CYTw
                    If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                    Comment


                    • Interesting article out of the Combatting Terror Center at USMA regarding the minimal impact on Ukraine from the neo-Nazi far right-

                      Trickle...Not A Flood-CTC USMA
                      "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
                      "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

                      Comment


                      • Yahh, pull the other one!!!
                        The latest Russian agitprop ploy is to attempt to paint a picture of:
                        “…happiness and love…” unfolding in occupied Kherson!
                        I’ve said it before; reading TASS or RIA articles is like delving into an alternate reality,
                        where black is white and war and invasion is glossed over and justified!

                        https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...cupied-kherson
                        When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow. - Anais Nin

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Naval_News

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	Russia-S-300-Ship-Sparta-II.jpg Views:	0 Size:	164.7 KB ID:	1591649
                          Screen capture of Sparta II, believed to be carrying S-300, passing through the Bosporus, Istanbul, Turkey. Via Yörük Işık


                          Russian S-300 Missile System Slips Through Bosporus Towards War In Ukraine

                          H.I. Sutton
                          28 August 2022
                          Naval News

                          Russia is prevented from moving its warships from the Mediterrean to the Black Sea because Turkey closed the Bosporus to warships. The narrow straits control access. Yet Russia has been able to transport advanced weapons systems, such as S-300 missiles, through the straits to support the war in Ukraine.

                          Under the cover of darkness, a nondescript Russian cargo ship slipped through the Bosporus in Turkey. The narrow strait is the only waterway connecting the Mediterranean with the Black Sea. The ship, Sparta II, is suspected to have been carrying sophisticated weapons towards Russia’s war in Ukraine.

                          Russia is believed to have shipped S-300 air defense system from its bases in Syria to the Black Sea.

                          Shortly after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Turkey closed the Bosporus to warships. This stopped the Russian Navy from reinforcing its naval forces fighting against Ukraine. But merchant ships could still pass.

                          Sparta II’s destination was Novorossiysk, a Russian port and major naval base close to the Kerch Bridge. By implication, the S-300 missiles are to bolster defenses either near Kerch, or other areas of Russian operations. Crimea is seeing increased Ukrainian drone activity and they may be to boost defenses there.

                          The ship is understood to have sailed from Tartus in Syria, where S-300 components had been gathered on the pier. The S-300 likely came from a site at Masyaf in northern Syria. It started the voyage on August 20 and passed the Bosporus overnight on August 24-25. The transit was observed by respected ship spotter Yörük Işık. After waiting at anchor near the Russian coast, it pulled into Novorossiysk on August 27.

                          The ship is understood to be owned by Oboronlogistika, which in effect means the Russian Ministry of Defense. The ship has specifically been added to the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanction list. The crew is civilian, but it’s cargo is often military.

                          The S-300 is a capable air defense missile system roughly analogous to the U.S. made Patriot. It has been augmented by the newer S-400 and S-350 systems but remains a relevant frontline system. In May this year the S-300 site at Masyaf was reported to have fired missiles at Israeli jets. It is these same units which are believed to have been shipped to the Black Sea.

                          The shift of powerful air defenses from Syria to the Black Sea may be significant. It implies shortages of systems supporting the war in Ukraine. At the same time it weakens Russian and Assad regime forces in Syria.

                          .
                          ...
                          Last edited by JRT; 28 Aug 22,, 18:53.
                          .
                          .
                          .

                          Comment


                          • Ok then, the Russians have shut down Nord Stream 1! Ostensibly to “repair” a leak somewhere in the pipeline;
                            not for the first time since the war started, but this time the consensus is that it won’t start up again.
                            Their usage of the “repair” excuse for reducing gas deliveries is running a bit threadbare.
                            Why don’t they come out and call it what it is: tit for tat for the injunctions!
                            But they do have to have their euphemism!
                            Case in point using: “Special Military Operations” instead of WAR!
                            To most people; but apparently not Russians: If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, tastes like a duck, then there’s a good chance it’s a duck!!!

                            https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-62766867

                            When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow. - Anais Nin

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Amled View Post
                              To most people; but apparently not Russians: If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, tastes like a duck, then there’s a good chance it’s a duck!!![/FONT][/SIZE]
                              You've been on this forum long enough that we don't automatically assume it's a duck. "If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and tastes like a duck, then's there's a good chance that it's .... a POISONED DECOY!

                              You're in a military forum.
                              Chimo

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                You've been on this forum long enough that we don't automatically assume it's a duck. "If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and tastes like a duck, then's there's a good chance that it's .... a POISONED DECOY!

                                You're in a military forum.
                                Or it's just a duck. Take your chance either way.

                                If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                                Comment

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