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  • A Missouri judge has booted a Soros backed prosecutor and her entire office off the case of the armed couple that defended their home, for being political critters.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/hotair....iticizing/amp/

    Comment


    • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
      A Missouri judge has booted a Soros backed prosecutor and her entire office off the case of the armed couple that defended their home, for being political critters.
      https://www.google.com/amp/s/hotair....iticizing/amp/
      Your own right-wing blog link says nothing about "Soros". You want to continue with this conspiracy theorist bullshit, do it elsewhere.
      “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

      Comment


      • Senate overwhelmingly advances defense bill that will rename Confederate bases, squashing Trump's chances of a veto

        The GOP-held Senate is handing President Trump a defeat that's not going to go over well with his base.

        The Senate voted 84-13 on Friday to defeat a filibuster holding up passage of the $741 billion defense bill, which includes a provision that mandates removing Confederate names from military bases. A Senate vote later Friday to officially pass the bill will be similarly overwhelming, CNN's Manu Raju reports, invalidating President Trump's promise to veto it.

        Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) had filibustered the National Defense Authorization Act, passed every year to fund the Pentagon, over provisions that would make it harder for Trump to reduce troops in Afghanistan and Germany, Military Times reports. He also clotheslined a stopgap funding measure meant to prevent a government shutdown for another week as Congress continues to debate coronavirus relief and a government funding bill. The House has already overwhelmingly passed both the stopgap measure and the defense bill.

        Trump has been pledging for months that he'd reject the defense bill if it included a provision to rename military bases named after Confederate leaders. Discussions over renaming the bases swelled over the summer during protests against police brutality and America's systemic racism. Trump has insisted that the Confederate names actually represent America's "history of winning, victory, and freedom," despite basic facts about the Civil War that would suggest otherwise.
        ______________
        “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

        Comment


        • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

          Your own right-wing blog link says nothing about "Soros". You want to continue with this conspiracy theorist bullshit, do it elsewhere.
          This article does Tops, open your mind....
          https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/n...ters-from-jail

          Comment


          • Originally posted by surfgun View Post

            This article does Tops, open your mind....
            https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/n...ters-from-jail
            Another shitty right-wing website? That's what you want me to "open my mind to"? And Soros as the bogeyman....should I start posting crap about the Rothschilds while I'm at it?

            I'm not going to say it again: Post your bullshit dog whistles elsewhere.
            “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

            Comment


            • She is linked to Soros the new DA in LA is linked to Soros. Live in denial of you wish.
              https://www.latimes.com/local/califo...523-story.html

              Last edited by surfgun; 11 Dec 20,, 21:24.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
                She is linked to Soros the new DA in LA is linked to Soros. Live in denial of you wish.
                https://www.latimes.com/local/califo...523-story.html
                I don't give a shit about the fact that she's linked to Soros and you damn well know it. Post more bullshit conspiracy theorist dog whistles and you are GONE.
                “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                Comment


                • Contribute into attributions much? I have no idea what is going on in that kind of yours Tops? I am talking about the evils of an attempted central globalist government the wishes to undermine the USA and its founding ideals.
                  But that goes over one’s head and it becomes something else?

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
                    Contribute into attributions much? I have no idea what is going on in that kind of yours Tops? I am talking about the evils of an attempted central globalist government the wishes to undermine the USA and its founding ideals.
                    But that goes over one’s head and it becomes something else?
                    You're spreading conspiracy theorist bullshit. Spread it somewhere else.
                    “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                    Comment


                    • GOP-controlled Senate defies Trump and easily passes $741 billion defense bill despite the president's veto threat

                      The Republican-controlled Senate on Friday passed the National Defense Authorization Act, a $741 billion defense bill, with a veto-proof majority. GOP senators overwhelmingly supported the legislation despite President Donald Trump's threats to veto it.

                      "This annual bill will unlock the training, tools, and cutting-edge equipment that our servicemembers and civilian employees need as they bravely defend American lives and American interests," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a tweet after the vote.

                      The Senate voted 84-13 to approve the bill, which provides appropriations to the Defense Department and defense-related activities in other federal agencies. The Democratic-controlled House also passed the bill with a veto-proof majority.

                      Friday's Senate vote could set up a showdown between Trump and Congress in the final days of his presidency. If he makes good on his threat, it appears the bill has enough support in both chambers to override a veto, in what would be a first for Trump.

                      Trump has objected to a provision in the bill that opens the door to rename military bases commemorating Confederate leaders. More recently, the president has demanded that the bill repeal Section 230, a part of the Communications Decency Act that protects social-media companies from being held liable for content posted on their platforms. Trump has accused social-media companies like Twitter and Facebook of being biased against conservatives.

                      But Section 230 has nothing to do with national defense, and Republicans have been urging Trump to support the defense bill. The NDAA has passed in Congress without much opposition for 60 consecutive years.

                      Ahead of the House vote on the bill earlier this week, Trump tweeted: "I hope House Republicans will vote against the very weak National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which I will VETO. Must include a termination of Section 230 (for National Security purposes), preserve our National Monuments, & allow for 5G & troop reductions in foreign lands!"

                      It's unclear whether Trump will follow through and veto the bill, given the overwhelming support for it in Congress. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider.

                      Trump has issued eight vetoes during his presidency, and none has been overridden.
                      ________

                      Three possibilities:

                      1. Trump meekly signs the bill
                      2. Trump vetoes and the GOP overrides him
                      3. Trump vetoes and the GOP once again surrenders

                      Place your bets ladies and gentlemen, place your bets...
                      “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

                        Another shitty right-wing website? That's what you want me to "open my mind to"? And Soros as the bogeyman....should I start posting crap about the Rothschilds while I'm at it?
                        Republicans don't seem to much like recycling when it is for the benefit of the environment, but have no issue recycling old fashioned anti-semitism when Jews dare to disagree with them.

                        sigpic

                        Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
                          Contribute into attributions much? I have no idea what is going on in that kind of yours Tops? I am talking about the evils of an attempted central globalist government the wishes to undermine the USA and its founding ideals.
                          But that goes over one’s head and it becomes something else?
                          central
                          globalist.
                          government.

                          that is all
                          Trust me?
                          I'm an economist!

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            Ahead of the House vote on the bill earlier this week, Trump tweeted: "I hope House Republicans will vote against the very weak National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which I will VETO. Must include a termination of Section 230 (for National Security purposes), preserve our National Monuments, & allow for 5G & troop reductions in foreign lands!"
                            ________

                            Three possibilities:

                            1. Trump meekly signs the bill
                            2. Trump vetoes and the GOP overrides him
                            3. Trump vetoes and the GOP once again surrenders

                            Place your bets ladies and gentlemen, place your bets...
                            It will be a number two with a splash. Trump will veto the bill, and there will be adequate bipartisan support in both houses to support overriding that veto.

                            Trump said that he will veto the bill if it did not include X, and the bill does not include X.

                            Trump's decision to follow through on the veto has nothing to do with X, rather it has to do with continued support of the Red-Hatted Mob and more donations into his slush fund.

                            It is not a small amount of Trump's future money at stake. Trump's slush fund received $207.5 million in donations a 30 days interval after the election.

                            Trump will get more support from the Red-Hatted Mob if he follows through on the veto threat, and less if he does not. So Trump will veto the bill.

                            Congress does not much care about advancing donations into Trump's slush fund, rather they have their own individual seats to save, and that is the highest priority of each individual above all other considerations. For most of them, passing the NDAA is the better political decision. Some Republican "fiscal conservatives" want less spending in everything, and some "progessive" Democrats want to spend the money on something else, and some individuals from both factions will take opportunity to make a show of that for their political base.

                            As groups, both parties in both houses passed the NDAA with numbers indicating a veto-proof majority; and when it is vetoed, both parties in both houses will follow through with the veto override.
                            Last edited by JRT; 12 Dec 20,, 14:31.
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                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by JRT View Post

                              It will be a number two with a splash. Trump will veto the bill, and there will be adequate bipartisan support in both houses to support overriding that veto.
                              It's one thing to pass the bill, it'll be another thing in entirely for a sufficient number of Republicans to so dramatically and publicly defy the will of their cult leader.

                              If they do, it would be pretty extraordinary, not to mention endlessly entertaining. It would also show that Trump's grip on the party might last too far past January 20th. His grip on the cult however...

                              I forgot Option #4: Trump sits on the bill and does nothing for 10 days, at which point it becomes law regardless.
                              “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                              Comment


                              • Brian Kemp Cast His Lot With Trump, and Has Now Paid the Price

                                ATLANTA — Few politicians have been both elevated and diminished by the vicissitudes of President Donald Trump like Brian Kemp, Georgia's Republican governor.

                                Kemp rocketed from hard-right underdog candidate to the governor’s mansion two years ago on the strength of a surprise endorsement from Trump, and an argument that the president was right about a lot of issues facing the country.

                                But these days Kemp is facing daily reminders of the perils of deciding that Trump is actually wrong.

                                In recent weeks, Kemp has infuriated the president for resisting his demands to help overturn the election results in Georgia, a state Trump lost by roughly 12,000 votes. The president’s outrage has spread to many of his supporters in Georgia as he persists in his extraordinary intervention into the nation’s electoral process.

                                At a news conference in the state Capitol on Tuesday to discuss the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine, Kemp was confronted by Trump loyalists asking why he had refused to call a special session of the legislature, as the president has requested, so that lawmakers can reallocate the state’s 16 electoral votes to Trump. The question crowded the screen of a Facebook live feed of the event. As he departed the event, Kemp was stopped by a small group who presented a bag that they said was filled with 2,000 petitions making the same plea.

                                “If he doesn’t call a special session, he’s definitely a one-term governor, no doubt about it,” said one of the activists, Erik Christensen, CEO of a moving company, who said he voted for Kemp in 2018.

                                Kemp is now the most vivid example of the battle-scarred and even shellshocked conservative Republicans who once basked in Trump’s glow but now find themselves derided for enforcing their state election rules and laws. Republican governors like Kemp and Doug Ducey of Arizona, and lower-level state officials like Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in Georgia, have emerged as a new kind of institutionalist in the face of the Trump attacks on the election system: They are refusing to bend procedures to the will of Trump, and potentially paying a political price for it.

                                As Trump continues to grope for a way to undo his electoral loss to President-elect Joe Biden, he is also engaged in a furious effort to torpedo Kemp’s political future.

                                Trump has called Kemp “hapless,” mocked him for a supposed dip in popularity, and suggested, at a recent rally, that U.S. Rep. Doug Collins should challenge Kemp in the primary when he seeks a second term in 2022.

                                “I’m ashamed that I endorsed him,” Trump said in a Fox News interview.


                                The president’s willingness to threaten the governor’s fervently pro-Trump voter base demonstrates how challenging it may be for Republicans to navigate a post-presidency in which the mercurial Trump could choose to play kingmaker, de facto party head and potential 2024 candidate.

                                Republican politicians, strategists and party officials are anxiously watching the turmoil in Georgia, fearing that the civil war the president started among Georgia’s Republicans could spread throughout the country. That would complicate the political dynamics for incumbents like Kemp, who plans to run for reelection two years from now.

                                In November’s election, Trump expanded the party base, driving up margins in rural areas, winning a larger share of Latino voters and capturing a record number of Republican votes. Whether those new voters will transform into loyal Republicans when Trump is not on the ticket remains one of the biggest uncertainties facing the party. And much may depend on what Trump tells Republicans to do.

                                “Any operative is wondering right now whether this is what the future looks like,” said Henry Barbour, a Republican committeeman from Mississippi and an influential voice in the party. “We don’t know, but the party has a tremendous opportunity going forward to build on what the president has accomplished.”

                                Kemp, 57, has not been the only target of Trump’s wrath. Republican politicians and officials across the country who have defended the integrity of the election — and resisted bending to the will of the president — have faced a backlash from their own party.

                                In Arizona, Trump has criticized Ducey for certifying Biden’s win in that state, and suggested he would also pay a political price for it. (“Republicans will long remember!” he wrote in a recent tweet.) While term limits prevent Ducey from seeking another term, he is among those mentioned as a potential presidential contender in 2024.

                                On the day that Ducey was selected to head the Republican Governors Association, Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona said in a column on a conservative news site that Ducey had “harmed the common cause of the Republican Party."

                                “The Duceys and the Kemps of the world, they may have some difficulty if they want to seek elective office within the Republican Party,” said Michael Burke, chairman of the Republican Party in Pinal County in Arizona. “People will remember what happened here,” added Burke, who worked at Trump’s properties before becoming involved with politics.

                                Allies of the president have begun issuing veiled threats toward Kemp, warning that what they see as his insufficient loyalty to the president could carry a political price.

                                “If you’re not fighting for Trump now when he needs you the most as a Republican leader in Georgia, people are not going to fight for you when you ask them to get reelected,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said in an appearance on Fox News
                                .

                                Democrats are trying to exploit these divisions. MeidasTouch, a progressive national political committee, announced plans this week to put up billboards in Georgia emblazoned with a Trump tweet that reads, “Why bother voting for Republicans if what you get is Ducey and Kemp?” Biden plans to travel to the state next week to campaign for the two Democratic candidates, who would give his party control of the Senate if they won runoffs against Republican incumbents on Jan. 5.

                                Kemp’s descent from Trump’s circle of approval is particularly striking. Throughout his career, he has taken pains to demonstrate his conservative credentials: In one particularly unsubtle ad that ran during his 2018 run for governor, titled “So Conservative,” he demonstrated his desire to “blow up government spending” with actual explosives, and “cut regulations” with a real chain saw.

                                It was Trump’s positive tweet just days before the Republican primary runoff that helped Kemp gain the nomination. Then in the general election, Kemp became one of the Trump era’s most enduring villains in the eyes of the left after his narrow victory over Stacey Abrams, who was vying to become the nation’s first Black woman governor.

                                Abrams and her allies argued that Kemp, then the secretary of state, engineered a “stolen” election by supporting policies that Democrats said amounted to voter suppression and in some cases targeted minorities.

                                Since then, much of Kemp’s political personality had been borrowed directly from Trump. Billing himself as a “politically incorrect conservative,” Kemp has echoed Trump’s hyperbolic message about the violent threats immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally pose to American citizens.

                                Despite his rhetoric, Kemp has not played the role of radical disrupter the way doctrinaire former Republican governors like Sam Brownback of Kansas or Bobby Jindal of Louisiana did. But he has delivered for his conservative base by supporting and signing an anti-abortion “heartbeat” law, which was permanently enjoined by the courts.

                                Other policy actions, including a raise for public schoolteachers, and a slew of appointments reflecting the state’s burgeoning diversity, suggest some movement on Kemp’s part toward a practical center. But much of that has been overshadowed by criticism of his reopening of the state in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic and his conflicts with the Democratic mayor of Atlanta, Keisha Lance Bottoms, including over her efforts to implement a mask mandate.

                                Still, this generally conservative track record has not stemmed the torrent of criticism that is engulfing the governor from the right. Nor have Kemp’s delicate — or perhaps awkward — efforts to praise Trump while steadfastly declining to give him the overturned election results he wants. At the news conference on Tuesday, for instance, Kemp talked about how “grateful” he was for the Trump administration’s “unprecedented and incredible achievement” of making the vaccine available.

                                A Republican consultant in Georgia familiar with Kemp’s thinking said that while the governor agrees with many of Trump’s policies, the president’s request that he work to overturn the election — a request Trump made in a phone call with the governor last weekend — crossed a line.

                                Kemp’s office declined to make him available for an interview.

                                Kemp’s relationship with the president began to seriously deteriorate late last year when he defied Trump’s wishes and appointed Kelly Loeffler, a wealthy Atlanta businesswoman, to an open Senate seat. Loeffler and Sen. David Perdue are the Republican candidates in the Georgia runoffs in January.

                                Kemp will have to run on a ticket in 2022 with whoever wins the Senate seat. By choosing Loeffler, he was most likely trying to craft the image of the state Republican Party in a way that he thought would reflect Georgia’s evolving politics: a female candidate who he believed could win back more moderate voters in Atlanta’s populous northern suburbs. He also considered Loeffler, a political novice, a good fit for his brand, which he considers to be pro-business, outside the establishment and conservative.

                                Trump preferred that the Senate seat go to Collins, the conservative Georgia Republican who had passionately defended Trump against impeachment. Collins subsequently jumped into this year’s race, losing in the first round of voting but pushing Loeffler far to the right to prove her conservative bona fides.

                                A similar dynamic could emerge if Trump backs a primary challenger in the 2022 governor’s race. That could lead Kemp to lurch rightward after he has made some effort to move to the center. Such a shift might help Abrams, who may challenge Kemp in a rematch.

                                But all of these projections are clouded with questions about the president himself. Will he get involved in 35 local and statewide races, or concentrate on two or three? Will he settle old scores? Kemp’s political future may depend on the answer.

                                “I’m 100% Donald Trump. I’m 100% Brian Kemp,” said former Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., a Trump ally. “I believe it’s just something that we’ve got to get through.”
                                _________

                                That's what's known as "juggling with chainsaws while blindfolded and drunk", Governor Kemp. But at least you finally came down on the side of the law.
                                “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                                Comment

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