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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    And so it begins.....

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/09/polit...per/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    Trump's immunity argument would no longer apply once he is out of office.
    ___________

    Tip of the iceberg, IMO. And the shit will hit the fan promptly at noon on January 21st.

    Tick tock ************.
    Yes, he is going to be a very busy man for the next four years. It is well deserved given the liar, cheat, and a weasel he is. Hopefully he ends up with a felony conviction out of New York.

    Leave a comment:


  • DOR
    replied
    Originally posted by tantalus View Post


    People should really listen to what he is saying on monetary policy 3. The point where governments influence on capital flows within society grows.

    If we think in terms of historical cycles than it means something different to have the landscape in american politics of today, than say in the 1950s or 1980s etc. In other words, this is not a time (stage of the cycle) where you want fiscal hawks to have strong influence. It also means one's views need to take into account the point in the cycle we are on, ones views need to change as the cycle progresses, not remain anchored to idelogical talking points.

    So the fact the senate remains under the influence of the fiscal hawks is ill timed. (edit. although it was never clear how a biden admin would think on these issues and what people would be positioned to make policy....it doesnt matter as much now as he is limited...)
    Common sense: don't cut government spending until private spending can replace it.
    However, do bear in mind that it is the House, and not the Senate, that controls the purse strings.

    Leave a comment:


  • tantalus
    replied


    People should really listen to what he is saying on monetary policy 3. The point where governments influence on capital flows within society grows.

    If we think in terms of historical cycles than it means something different to have the landscape in american politics of today, than say in the 1950s or 1980s etc. In other words, this is not a time (stage of the cycle) where you want fiscal hawks to have strong influence. It also means one's views need to take into account the point in the cycle we are on, ones views need to change as the cycle progresses, not remain anchored to idelogical talking points.

    So the fact the senate remains under the influence of the fiscal hawks is ill timed. (edit. although it was never clear how a biden admin would think on these issues and what people would be positioned to make policy....it doesnt matter as much now as he is limited...)
    Last edited by tantalus; 07 Nov 20,, 20:44.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    commented on 's reply
    Citizen Trump will face legal woes

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Since taking office in January 2017, President Donald Trump has been besieged by civil lawsuits and criminal investigations of his inner circle.

    With Democrat Joe Biden capturing the presidency on Saturday, according to all major U.S. television networks, Trump's legal woes are likely to deepen because in January he will lose the protections the U.S. legal system affords to a sitting president, former prosecutors said.

    Here are some of the lawsuits and criminal probes that may haunt Trump as he leaves office.

    A NEW YORK PROSECUTOR

    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, who enforces New York state laws, has been conducting a criminal investigation into Trump and the Trump Organization for more than two years.

    The probe originally focused on hush money payments that Trump's former lawyer and self-described fixer Michael Cohen paid before the 2016 election to two women who said they had sexual encounters with Trump, which the president has denied.

    Vance, a Democrat, has suggested in recent court filings that his probe is now broader and could focus on bank, tax and insurance fraud, as well as falsification of business records.

    Republican Trump has called Vance's case politically motivated harassment.

    The case has drawn attention because of Vance's efforts to obtain eight years of Trump's tax returns. In July, the U.S. Supreme Court, denying Trump's bid to keep the returns under wraps, said the president was not immune from state criminal probes while in office, but could raise other defenses to Vance's subpoena.

    Vance will likely ultimately prevail in obtaining Trump's financial records, legal experts said.

    The U.S. Justice Department has said a sitting president cannot be indicted. Vance is not bound by that policy because he is not a federal prosecutor, but he may still have been reluctant to charge Trump because of uncertainty over whether the case was constitutional, said Harry Sandick, a former prosecutor in New York.

    "Those concerns will disappear when Trump leaves office," Sandick said.

    The investigation poses a threat to Trump, said Corey Brettschneider, a professor of political science at Brown University.

    “The fact that they have issued the subpoenas and have litigated all the way to the Supreme Court suggests that this is a very serious criminal investigation of the president,” Brettschneider said.

    JUSTICE DEPARTMENT PROBE?

    Trump could conceivably face a criminal prosecution brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, led by a new U.S. Attorney General.

    Some legal experts have said Trump could face federal income tax evasion charges, pointing to a New York Times report that Trump paid $750 in federal income taxes in both 2016 and 2017.

    "You've got the stuff that has come out of the New York Times that has all kind of indicia of tax fraud," Nick Akerman, a lawyer at Dorsey & Whitney and a former federal prosecutor.

    Akerman cautioned that it is not possible to know for certain until seeing all of the evidence.

    Trump has rejected findings from the Times report, tweeting that he had paid many millions of dollars in taxes but was entitled to depreciation and tax credits.

    Such a prosecution would be deeply controversial, and the Justice Department could decide charging Trump is not in the public interest even if there is evidence of criminal wrongdoing.

    Biden has approached that question very carefully, saying he would not interfere with his Justice Department's judgment.

    Biden told National Public Radio in August that pursuing criminal charges against his predecessor would be "a very, very unusual thing and probably not very - how can I say it? - good for democracy."

    A lawyer for Trump did not return requests for comment.

    NEW YORK CIVIL FRAUD INVESTIGATION

    New York's Attorney General, Letitia James, has an active tax fraud investigation into Trump and his family company, the Trump Organization.

    The inquiry by James, a Democrat, began after Trump's former lawyer Cohen told Congress the president inflated asset values to save money on loans and insurance and deflated them to reduce real estate taxes.

    The Trump Organization has argued the case is politically motivated.

    The inquiry is a civil investigation, meaning it could result in financial penalties but not jail time.

    Trump's son, Eric Trump, an executive vice president for the firm, was deposed in October because of what the attorney general described as his close involvement in one or more transactions being reviewed.

    E. JEAN CARROLL

    E. Jean Carroll, a former Elle magazine writer, sued Trump for defamation in 2019 after the president denied Carroll's allegation that he raped her in the 1990s and accused her of lying to drum up sales for a book.

    In August, a state judge allowed the case to go forward, meaning Carroll's lawyers could seek a DNA sample from Trump to match against a dress she said she wore at the New York City department store.

    A federal judge in Manhattan rejected a bid by the U.S. Justice Department to substitute the federal government for Trump as defendant in the case. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan said that Trump did not make his statements about Carroll in the scope of his employment as president.

    Barbara McQuade, a law professor at the University of Michigan, said she expected Biden's Justice Department to abandon the effort to shield Trump from the case.

    "It would seem unlikely for DOJ to continue to pursue what I see as a frivolous argument in a new administration," said McQuade, a former federal prosecutor.

    SUMMER ZERVOS

    Trump also faces a lawsuit by Summer Zervos, a 2005 contestant on Trump’s reality television show “The Apprentice,” who says Trump kissed her against her will at a 2007 meeting and later groped her at a hotel.

    After Trump called Zervos a liar, she sued him for defamation.

    Trump said he is immune from the lawsuit because he is president.

    The case https://de.reuters.com/article/usa-t...-idINL1N21115J has been on hold while a New York state appeals court reviewed a March 2019 decision that Trump had to face the case while he is in office. Trump's immunity argument would no longer apply once he is out of office.
    ___________

    Tip of the iceberg, IMO. And the shit will hit the fan promptly at noon on January 21st.

    Tick tock ************.

  • TopHatter
    commented on 's reply
    Trump’s post-presidency: Stay relevant, make money, avoid indictment
    He could try another run for office, launching a new political party or investing in a conservative outlet — all intended to keep him in the public eye.

    It all finally caught up to Donald Trump.

    Trump, who built a brand on projecting indestructibility, has been branded as something he despises: a loser.

    Trump, 74, was born into a wealthy family, built a global business (with a few bankruptcies along the way), became a reality TV star and then won the presidency with no political experience. It allowed the braggadocious businessman to craft his own legacy: Success against all odds.

    But now investigators are examining whether Trump improperly inflated assets, evaded taxes and paid off women alleging affairs in violation of campaign finance laws. Women have filed lawsuits accusing him of harassing and assaulting them. Lenders are looking for hundreds of millions of dollars in loans to be repaid.

    And he’s lost the legal immunity the presidency confers on him. He’s lost the White House’s bully pulpit.
    He may lose the GOP.

    So Trump must plot how he can make the money he will need, keep the attention he craves and evade the authorities probing him. And according to Republicans familiar with the situation, he has already started doing that.

    He could start his own conservative network or invest in an existing one, such as Newsmax, whose majority owner is a close friend, Chris Ruddy. Another option is One American News Network, a Trump-praising outlet he frequently praises. Then there’s Sinclair Broadcasting, which owns local TV stations across the country.

    Or maybe Trump launches his own political party. People in his orbit were already teasing another run for president against Joe Biden in 2024 in the days before the race was called.

    The chatter alone is central to keeping the Trump brand alive as he faces down lawsuits, debt collectors and criminal investigators. He’s also stirring up chatter with lawsuits and recount demands contesting the election results.

    “When have you had a president, with the exception of Nixon, who faced at the moment they leave office these gargantuan shadows?” said presidential historian Michael Bechloss, recalling the possible indictments that loomed over Richard Nixon when he resigned the presidency during the Watergate scandal.

    But first, there are some business decisions Trump must confront now that Biden, Trump’s Democratic rival, on Saturday was declared the winner, securing the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency.

    Trump needs to decide whether to resume running his namesake company, which comprises more than 500 businesses, including hotels, resorts and golf clubs. The Trump Organization is presumed to have lost millions of dollars during the coronavirus outbreak, and Forbes estimates that Trump’s net worth dropped $1 billion during the global pandemic.

    Trump biographer Michael D’Antonio said Trump has been savvy about exploiting media opportunities throughout his life, whether it’s the New York tabloids or “The Apprentice.”

    I think it’s inevitable that he has a media platform,” he said. “Now the opportunity to broadcast is available to almost anyone at almost no cost. I think people would watch Trump bloviate spontaneously from any outlet. That’s going to appeal to him immensely.”

    In 2016, when Trump expected to lose to Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, he had planned to start a media company, according to a Republican.

    But now that he’s served as president, some Republicans said he will be tempted to keep himself in politics, whether that’s through the GOP or his own party.

    Not everyone in the Republican Party will welcome him. The GOP is torn between conservatives who passionately support Trump and moderates who are eager to distance themselves, but held back due to fears over backlash from Trump’s base. The direction the party shifts could be based on whether Trump fades from political relevance after leaving office, the way former presidents Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush did.

    “He’s brought people out the party needs to capture certainly, but do they stay without him?” said a former Trump aide. “The party needs some of him, but not all of him.”

    Even if the party doesn’t want all of Trump — or even some of him — that wouldn’t stop Trump from barreling ahead with another White House run. After all, the GOP didn’t really want him the first time around. Mick Mulvaney, who worked as White House chief of staff until this year and now serves as special envoy for Northern Ireland, even predicted Trump would do just that.

    “I would absolutely expect the president to stay involved in politics and would absolutely put him on the shortlist of people who are likely to run in 2024,” he said in an event hosted by the Institute for International and European Affairs, an Irish think tank.

    Trump, who spent decades teasing a White House bid before finally running in 2016, plowed through a first term marred by an impeachment trial, omnipresent investigations, back-biting leaks, tell-all memoirs from ex-staffers, prominent resignations and firings and crisis after crisis of his own making.

    But his turbulent time as president is not necessarily a liability for future political ambitions. Instead, the bigger factor could be the litany of problems he will face after leaving office.

    While in the White House, Trump has been largely protected from facing criminal charges, given a longstanding Justice Department precedent not to indict a sitting president. But once he leaves, he’ll have to grapple with a series of investigations that might directly implicate him.

    The New York Attorney General’s Office is investigating whether Trump and his company misreported assets on financial statements used to seek loans, tax breaks and economic benefits.

    And the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus Vance, is still probing Trump’s payoffs to two women to keep them quiet during the 2016 campaign about extramarital affairs with Trump. Trump’s ex-lawyer, Michael Cohen, already went to jail over the payments, which violated campaign finance law. Trump himself was implicated in the scheme, with prosecutors saying he directed Cohen to make the hush money payments. There has long been speculation that Trump could face charges in the case after leaving office, although it’s far from certain he will.

    Vance’s inquiry may also be broader than the hush money payments, possibly including a probe of tax crimes and bank and insurance fraud, according to court filings.

    Since both probes are state — not federal — investigations, Trump can’t pardon himself on the way out the door.

    Still, no president has been charged with a crime — aside from Ulysses S. Grant, who got arrested for speeding in his horse and buggy — and it’s possible Trump would be given special dispensation as a former president. And notably, Nixon got a preemptive pardon after his resignation from Gerald Ford, saving the ex-president from any legal troubles.

    Separately, Trump’s finances are about to become a focal point.

    Trump has to pay back $421 million in loans that he has personally guaranteed, much of it to foreign creditors, most due in the next four years, according to an investigation in The New York Times detailing his personal and business tax returns. The investigation also found Trump attempted to secure a $72 million refund from the IRS in 2010 by claiming $1.4 billion in losses in 2008 and 2009, triggering a years-long audit that could cost him millions in back taxes.

    Yet Trump has, again and again, evaded, side-stepped and shrugged off legal, financial and personal woes.

    Trump has survived an impeachment trial, numerous accusations of sexual misconduct and thousands of lawsuits. While he has been through adversities of his own making — bankruptcies, settlements with authorities over alleged malfeasance at his charitable foundation and the now-shuttered Trump University — he has always remained unbowed.

    Trump biographer Tim O’Brien said Trump has been isolated from the consequences of his actions his whole life because of his wealth, celebrity and presidency. That could extend to his post-presidency: “Will he yet again get another break because of these life preservers that have always been floating under his arms?”
    ____________


  • tantalus
    replied
    You have to laugh darkly at the behaviour of the stock market to the election. For weeks they discuss, trump vs biden, trump, biden and in the end it pops due to the prospect of political gridlock.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Dan Crenshaw Spars with Rep. Taylor Greene over Trump’s Fraud Claims: ‘Start Acting’ Like a Congresswoman

    Representative Dan Crenshaw (R., Texas) slammed newly-elected congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene, who has expressed support for the wild internet conspiracy theory QAnon, after Greene accused him of being insufficiently supportive of President Trump’s reelection bid.

    Trump claims, without evidence, that Democrats are conducting widespread voter fraud in crucial swing states. Because of the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent backlog of mail-in ballots, elections officials have not yet finished counting enough votes in Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Arizona, for observers to make a definite call on the final results.

    “If Trump loses, he loses,” Crenshaw, an Afghanistan War veteran, wrote on Twitter. “But the unfortunate reality is that there is very little trust in the process, where irregularities have been flagrant and transparency lacking. It should not be partisan to suggest calmly that investigations occur and the court process plays out.”

    Greene then retweeted Crenshaw and appeared to imply that the Texas congressman was insufficiently loyal to the president. The newly-elected congresswoman has raised eyebrows with her support of some aspects of the QAnon conspiracy theory, which holds that Trump is fighting a cabal of pedophile sex-traffickers among Democrats, the media, the “deep state,” and Hollywood.

    “This loser mindset is how the Democrats win,” Greene wrote of Crenshaw. “President Trump has fought for us, we have to fight for him. We won’t forget. Trust me.”

    Crenshaw then admonished Greene, accusing her of debasing the office she just won.

    “Did you even read past the first sentence? Or are you just purposely lying so you can talk tough?” Crenshaw responded. “No one said give up. I literally said investigate every irregularity and use the courts. You’re a member of Congress now, Marjorie. Start acting like one.”

    Republicans are not unanimous in full-throated support of Trump’s voter fraud allegations. Senators Mitt Romney (R., Utah) and Ben Sasse (R., Neb.) have said that if the president has serious concerns of fraud, then he should back them up with evidence. By contrast, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R., Calif.) told Fox News on Thursday, “President Trump won this election, so everyone who’s listening, do not be quiet.”

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) stated on Twitter that “every legal vote should be counted. Any illegally-submitted ballots must not. All sides must get to observe the process.”
    ____________

    This new crop of idiots is gonna fit right into the Trump GOP. Poor Dan Crenshaw doesn't realize yet, but he's on the wrong side of the party.

    Leave a comment:


  • DOR
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by JRT View Post
    It won't happen, but an amusing alternative to ponder would be Trump taking an early January diplomatic trip to Moscow on Air Force One, and resigning there, and not returning until and unless he receives full pardon from POTUS-46 Pence. And then Pence does not follow through on the pardon, and Trump lives out the rest of his life in Russia.
    ... and he keeps the plane!

  • Albany Rifles
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by JRT View Post

    Comparing Trump to Amin is amusing.

    There could be a good Saturday Night Live skit in that, with Alec Baldwin as Trump and guest Forest Whitaker reprising his role as Idi Amin aka, "His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular", a moniker that he conferred upon himself.
    The Last King of Scotland is a great movie!

  • Bigfella
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by JRT View Post

    Comparing Trump to Amin is amusing.

    There could be a good Saturday Night Live skit in that, with Alec Baldwin as Trump and guest Forest Whitaker reprising his role as Idi Amin aka, "His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular", a moniker that he conferred upon himself.
    If not for the quality of healthcare a man as wealthy as Trump has access to in the US the Amin comparison might be even more apposite than you think.

  • JRT
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Maybe even Saudi Arabia like Idi Amin...
    Comparing Trump to Amin is amusing.

    There could be a good Saturday Night Live skit in that, with Alec Baldwin as Trump and guest Forest Whitaker reprising his role as Idi Amin aka, "His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular", a moniker that he conferred upon himself.
    Last edited by JRT; 06 Nov 20,, 02:25.

  • TopHatter
    commented on 's reply
    How Trump's legal woes will worsen once he leaves office
    Donald Trump has used his duties as president to shield himself from a variety of lawsuits during the last four years. That will change if Joe Biden deposes him and Trump becomes a private citizen once again.

    Trump is a magnet for litigation, and he already faces two separate inquiries into his business dealings by the New York state attorney general and the New York City district attorney. There are civil suits against Trump by two women claiming he defamed them by calling them liars when they accused him of sexual crimes. There’s also the further possibility that federal prosecutors could charge Trump with obstruction of justice or other crimes relating to the Robert Mueller investigation, Trump’s failed attempt to link Joe Biden with Ukrainian corruption and the same campaign-finance violations his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, went to prison for.

    Many Trump critics—including the possible vice president-elect, Kamala Harris—have called for aggressive federal prosecution of Trump once he leaves the White House. In his probe of possible Trump campaign ties to Russia, special prosecutor Robert Mueller highlighted several instances of Trump behavior that may have been obstruction of justice. Mueller could have charged Trump, but he didn’t, most likely because of Justice Department policy opposing any federal prosecution of a sitting president. Many legal experts think Mueller was building a case against Trump for prosecutors to use once Trump was out of office.

    Active investigations into Trumpworld
    But federal prosecution of a former president would be unprecedented and fraught with political danger. The more immediate threat for Trump is probably an acceleration of the two New York cases, once Trump can no longer claim presidential privilege to hold off prosecutors. “His principal criminal problem is going to be at the state level,” says Ben Wittes, editor-in-chief of Lawfare. “Those are clearly active investigation looking at his finances, and I assume his finances are problematic. Trumpworld is a target-rich environment.”

    New York City District Attorney Cyrus Vance is seeking at least eight years’ of Trump’s personal and corporate financial records, in a probe most likely focusing on possible fraud by Trump’s family business, detailed in several New York Times exposes. Vance may also be looking into the two 2016 hush-money payments to women Trump allegedly had affairs with. Cohen, when he was Trump’s lawyer, arranged those payments, and in 2018 he pled guilty to violating campaign-finance law, among other things. If Cohen committed a crime by arranging the payments, then it stands to reason that Trump—who signed the checks—did too.

    Trump’s lawyers have repeatedly argued that Trump’s duties as president should shield him from such prosecution. Lower courts have shot that down, Trump has appealed, and the Supreme Court will now decide once and for all whether Vance can obtain Trump’s financial records—perhaps soon. The Court may simply refuse to consider Trump’s latest appeal, which would leave the Appeals Court ruling intact and force Trump and his accounting firm to turn over the material. It could also hear the case—with three Trump appointees presiding. But if the court puts the Vance case on the docket, it would be after Trump leaves the White House, assuming Biden’s lead in the electoral college holds up.

    The New York State attorney general is pursuing a civil case against Trump’s business, looking into claims that Trump deliberately misvalued several holdings, as Cohen and others have alleged. That case might also move more quickly if Trump becomes a private citizen who can’t claim any special treatment.

    In a defamation case against Trump brought by E. Jean Carroll, U.S. Attorney General William Barr had moved to invalidate the suit by claiming Trump had immunity as a federal employee, and appointing the Justice Department, rather than Trump’s personal lawyers, to defend Trump. An appeals court judge shot that down last month. Barr’s Justice Department could appeal, but the point would become moot if Trump is due to leave his federal job in January. Carroll’s case would essentially be toast if she had to battle the Justice Department. But with Trump out of office Carroll’s case can continue as a dispute between two private parties.

    Another woman, Summer Zervos, has also brought a defamation suit against Trump, with Trump once again claiming presidential immunity. That case is headed to a New York appeals court in 2021, with the immunity claim obviously neutered if Trump is no longer president.

    A pardon or a case against Trump
    Trump’s departure from government could also lead to some kind of resolution of his supposed audits at the IRS. The current IRS commissioner is a Trump appointee, which makes it unlikely Trump would face an adverse tax ruling that could cost him millions or even hundreds of millions of dollars. But the dynamic could flip once Trump is gone, especially if the IRS feels duty-bound to demonstrate its independence by going tough on Trump. We know very little about Trump’s tax disputes with the IRS, however, and Trump becoming a private citizen once again wouldn’t necessarily change that.

    As for possible federal prosecution of Trump once he leaves office, Trump does have the option of trying to pardon himself before Jan. 20. That would be unprecedented, and the question of whether it’s legal might end up before the Supreme Court. It might also imply guilt in a way that could work against Trump in other cases at the state or local level. Another option is for Trump to resign before January and strike a deal with Mike Pence, who would become president long enough to pardon Trump in a way that might be less legally dubious—but would still imply guilt.

    If there’s no pardon, Biden would face the unsavory prospect of pursuing a criminal case against Trump likely to be politically explosive, given that nearly half of all voters wanted Trump to be reelected. The cleanest way to do it might be appointing a bipartisan commission of respected prosecutors to study the question and make recommendations as to whether the Barr Justice Department properly handled the matter, or violated legal or ethical norms. If the feds do pursue a case against Trump, a special prosecutor insulated from political influence—yes, like Mueller—would probably be better than Justice Department prosecutors answering to the attorney general, who’s a presidential appointee.

    There’s also a case for dropping the matter at the federal level, which would fit with Biden’s call for unity and preserve precious political capital for other priorities. What Biden shouldn’t do is choose an attorney general with an explicit agenda one way or the other. “Biden’s role is to pick the right person for attorney general, then defer to that person,” Wittes says. “You don’t want to appoint somebody who has an obvious vendetta. You want to appoint somebody of enormous nonpartisan stature, and then defer to that person.” It might be a decision Biden is happy to delegate.
    _____________


    "Nothing stops. Nothing... or you will do the hardest time there is. No more protection from the guards. I'll pull you out of that one-bunk Hilton and cast you down with the Sodomites. You'll think you've been fucked by a train!"


  • tbm3fan
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by JRT View Post
    It won't happen, but an amusing alternative to ponder would be Trump taking an early January diplomatic trip to Moscow on Air Force One, and resigning there, and not returning until and unless he receives full pardon from POTUS-46 Pence. And then Pence does not follow through on the pardon, and Trump lives out the rest of his life in Russia.
    Maybe even Saudi Arabia like Idi Amin...

  • JRT
    commented on 's reply
    It won't happen, but an amusing alternative to ponder would be Trump taking an early January diplomatic trip to Moscow on Air Force One, and resigning there, and not returning until and unless he receives full pardon from POTUS-46 Pence. And then Pence does not follow through on the pardon, and Trump lives out the rest of his life in Russia.
    Last edited by JRT; 05 Nov 20,, 19:08.
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