Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The US 2020 Presidential Election

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • “I will restore law and order to our country” - Donald J. Trump, 2016 RNC convention


    Trump at RNC finale:
    “I will restore law and order to our country”

    By THE WASHINGTON POST
    PUBLISHED: July 22, 2016 at 12:48 a.m. | UPDATED: July 22, 2016 at 12:51 a.m.

    Donald Trump painted a dire portrait of a lawless, terrorized nation as he accepted the Republican presidential nomination here Thursday night, delivering a sweeping indictment of a feckless political and corporate class that he argued was thrusting the United States into a perilous decline.

    Declaring that he alone has the leadership strength to secure the homeland and rejuvenate the economy, the billionaire real estate mogul offered himself as a “law and order” candidate and made a direct appeal to blue-collar Americans who have felt left behind in the 21st century.

    “The forgotten men and women of our country – people who work hard but no longer have a voice: I am your voice,” Trump said in a long address to fired-up delegates on the closing night of the Republican National Convention.

    Rather than pivoting to the political middle with an uplifting address, Trump punctuated the turbulent four-day convention with a heavy speech with simple declarations. And he focused intensively on the alleged dangers posed by immigrants and refugees, showing that on the biggest stage of his campaign he would not shy away from rhetoric that many minority voters find repulsive.

    Trump spoke with so much gusto it sounded much of the time as though he were screaming, and by the end his face was notably red and glistening with sweat. The address lasted an extraordinary 76 minutes, with balloons falling in Quicken Loans Arena and fireworks shooting over Lake Erie nearly an hour after the scheduled time.

    The tone of his prepared text was hard-edged – at times severe – and echoed the dark themes of Richard Nixon’s 1968 campaign. Trump is betting that general-election voters feel so beleaguered that they will heed his call for radical change.

    Trump described the country as beset by illegal immigrants, some of them killers. The crowd chanted back at him, “Send them home,” and “Build the wall.” And Trump decried an increase in homicides in some cities.

    “I have a message to every last person threatening the peace on our streets and the safety of our police: When I take the oath of office next year, I will restore law and order to our country. Believe me. Believe me,” he said.

    Trump’s relentlessly gloomy tone was a jarring contrast to the sunny introduction by his daughter Ivanka Trump, who portrayed him as a generous, magnanimous business executive who would be “the people’s champion” and “a fighter” who delivers results.

    She said her father has been an advocate for women in his company and would do the same as president, saying that he supports equal pay for equal work and would change labor laws to help make high-quality child care affordable – all priorities of presumed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

    Donald Trump laid out stark differences between his agenda and that of Clinton. He asserted that his rival is a “puppet” of corporations and elites, and that she would “keep our rigged system in place.”

    Trump blamed Clinton directly for the past decade and a half of foreign policies that have wrought turmoil in the Middle East and cast the former secretary of state as a favor-trading, self-enriching agent of overseas powers.

    “This is the legacy of Hillary Clinton: death, destruction, terrorism and weakness,” he said. “But Hillary Clinton’s legacy does not have to be America’s legacy.”

    As Trump attacked Clinton, the attendees chanted, “Lock her up!” as they had for previous speakers. At one point, Trump tried to shush his supporters. He gestured “no” with his hands and declared that together they should beat her at the polls in November.

    Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, said in a statement: “Tonight, Donald Trump painted a dark picture of an America in decline. And his answer – more fear, more division, more anger, more hate – was yet another reminder that he is temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified to be President of the United States.”

    In virtually every policy realm, Trump vowed to put the country’s interests before any other – redirecting Washington’s gaze inward in an age of globalization.

    “Americanism, not globalism, will be our credo,” he said. “As long as we are led by politicians who will not put America first, then we can be assured that other nations will not treat America with respect – the respect that we deserve. The American people will come first once again.”

    Thursday’s address was the most consequential of Trump’s brief and remarkable political career. He strode onstage to the “Air Force One” theme song before an enormous screen displaying his name in huge gold letters.

    The stakes were made higher by missteps and missed opportunities during the convention’s first three nights, putting pressure on the nominee to convince the general electorate that he has a credible and appealing vision for the nation’s future.

    Throughout his remarks, Trump cast himself as a change agent and Clinton as a guardian of the status quo.

    “I have joined the political arena so that the powerful can no longer beat up on people that cannot defend themselves,” he said.

    Trump directly addressed some of the more controversial policy proposals of his candidacy, including his vague, newly formulated vow to temporarily ban people from any nation connected to terrorism from entering the United States.

    “We don’t want them in our country,” Trump said. He added, “I only want to admit individuals into our country who will support our values and love our people. Anyone who endorses violence, hatred or oppression is not welcome in our country and never, ever will be.”

    He also vowed, “We are going to defeat the barbarians of ISIS and we are going to defeat them fast,” referring to the Islamic State.

    Earlier in the evening, Maricopa County (Arizona) Sheriff Joe Arpaio, one of the most polarizing figures in the immigration debate, vouched for Trump’s proposal to build a wall along the Mexican border.

    He said, “Donald Trump will build the wall” – at which point the crowd chanted “Build the wall!” – “and restore law and order and keep drugs and illegal immigrants from entering our country.”

    But another moment illustrated the swift evolution of some Republicans on social issues. Billionaire entrepreneur Peter Thiel said, “I am proud to be gay. I am proud to be a Republican. But most of all, I am proud to be an American” – the first to make such a declaration at a GOP convention. Thousands of delegates rose to their feet and cheered.

    When Trump later referred to the recent massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, and said he would “protect our LGBTQ citizens,” the crowd applauded loudly. Taking it in, Trump said, “As a Republican, I have to say, it is so nice to hear you cheering.”

    Trump was under pressure to project unity for the fractured Republican Party, which was split anew by an extraordinary uproar Wednesday night on the convention floor. As it became clear that Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas) would not endorse his former primary rival in his prime-time address, the crowd booed and jeered him until he exited the stage.

    As speakers all week have done, Trump sought to rally Republicans to his cause with sharp and relentless attacks on Clinton and the Democratic Party.

    “We cannot afford to be so politically correct anymore,” he said to enthusiastic cheers. “So if you want to hear the corporate spin, the carefully crafted lies and the media myths, the Democrats are holding their convention next week. But here, at our convention, there will be no lies. We will honor the American people with the truth, and nothing else.”

    One of the loudest crowd responses came when Trump introduced his new running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who has strong support among evangelicals and other conservatives.

    In a remarkable departure from past GOP conventions, Trump made no mention of God, religion or his faith. And although he thanked the evangelical community for supporting him, he sounded a rare note of self-deprecation, saying, “I’m not sure I really deserve it.”

    Trump was unquestionably the star of the final evening. Throughout the night, his family, friends and employees talked glowingly about his character and leadership style. In gauzy videos as well as speeches, they described him as a compassionate visionary with a connection to the common man and a drive to fix problems and finish projects.

    “I truly believe Mr. Trump is America’s blue-collar billionaire,” said Jerry Falwell Jr., president of Liberty University. “He is down-to-earth. He loves America and the American people. He is a true patriot and a champion of the common man.”

    At center stage was Trump’s eldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, who introduced herself as non-partisan. “Like many of my fellow millennials, I do not consider myself categorically Republican or Democrat.”She spoke passionately about her father’s competitive drive. “I have seen him fight for his family,” she said. “I have seen him fight for his employees, I have seen him fight for his company, and now I am seeing him fight for our country. It’s been the story of his life and, more recently, the spirit of his campaign.”

    And she said her father “cannot stand to see” empty main streets and boarded-up factories, college graduates who are crippled by student debt and mothers who cannot afford the cost of child care.

    “Other politicians see these hardships, see the unfairness of it all, and say, ‘I feel for you,’ ” she said, evoking former president Bill Clinton’s legendary displays of empathy. “Only my father will say, ‘I’ll fight for you.’ ”

    Donald Trump picked up from his daughter by saying he is ready to go to work for the country.

    “It’s time to deliver a victory for the American people,” he said. “We don’t win anymore, but we are going to start winning again. . . . America is a nation of believers, dreamers and strivers that is being led by a group of censors, critics and cynics.”

    He continued with an appeal to voters: “To every parent who dreams for their child, and every child who dreams for their future, I say these words to you tonight: I’m with you, I will fight for you, and I will win for you.”

    .


    ...
    .
    .
    .

    Comment


    • He is still stealing directly from Richard Nixon and his stump speech in 1968 right after the Democratic Convention in Chicago. Nixon used it as call for Southerners to back him against all the lawless blacks.

      Of course, Nixon promised to restore law and order to our cities and provide new leadership concerning the Vietnam War. He obviously failed in both, if you were there, yet managed to get re-elected in 1972 the year he opened up China. Do we still have a Silent Majority today? Although the Silent Majority only gave Nixon 43 percent of the vote in 1968. His advantage in 72 was having McGovern/Eagleton to compete against to start and then the shift to Shriver which pretty much doomed that ticket from the get go.

      Trump trying to play the same game, again, only problem is he is the incumbent who has lost control like the Democrats did in 1968. Plus his catcall to whites can be nowhere as successful as Nixon was since most all voters in 1968 were white. Not today.

      Comment


      • the initial CARES act is about to expire, all while COVID rates are exploding across the US and businesses are shuttering down again.

        Senate Republicans are advocating for corporate liability protection until 2024 and a capital gains cut, and reducing unemployment insurance.

        Trump is advocating for a payroll tax cut.

        the insanity continues.
        There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

        Comment


        • Originally posted by astralis View Post
          the initial CARES act is about to expire, all while COVID rates are exploding across the US and businesses are shuttering down again.

          Senate Republicans are advocating for corporate liability protection until 2024 and a capital gains cut, and reducing unemployment insurance.

          Trump is advocating for a payroll tax cut.

          the insanity continues.
          I feel like I am locked in a car trunk and Thelma & Louise are driving.
          “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
          Mark Twain

          Comment


          • Originally posted by astralis View Post
            the initial CARES act is about to expire, all while COVID rates are exploding across the US and businesses are shuttering down again.

            Senate Republicans are advocating for corporate liability protection until 2024 and a capital gains cut, and reducing unemployment insurance.

            Trump is advocating for a payroll tax cut.

            the insanity continues.
            Yep, everyone one a bone to major corporations and investors for their pockets. Not to mention one to starve Social Security.

            So do all of you/me with ordinary jobs feel all warm and cozy because someone is looking out for us?

            Comment


            • There is nothing insane about arguing for some sort of liability shield, structuring unemployment benefits so there is an incentive to return to work, and cutting employer-side payroll taxes (which are always a good idea).

              There is a problem with capital gains tax holidays, but since this is the 2020 Election thread and not the Corona thread, I'll take it 7 days a week over taxing all capital gains as ordinary income (and then raising the ordinary income tax rate as well)
              "The great questions of the day will not be settled by means of speeches and majority decisions but by iron and blood"-Otto Von Bismarck

              Comment


              • Originally posted by GVChamp View Post
                There is nothing insane about arguing for some sort of liability shield
                Not when a company wants you to work and doesn't provided a safe workplace. Why not shut down OSHA while they are at it? I guess this fits with the idea of personal responsibility. Take care of yourself at work and try not to get killed but if so then oh well.

                structuring unemployment benefits so there is an incentive to return to work
                Well of course but then tell that to companies that have laid off people and are not calling them back. Just wait till the airlines way in with their layoffs. Yep, this is a perfect time to go looking for work when no one is really hiring.

                and cutting employer-side payroll taxes (which are always a good idea).
                Never a good idea unless you have something against Social Security and Disability Insurance. Do you?

                There is a problem with capital gains tax holidays, but since this is the 2020 Election thread and not the Corona thread, I'll take it 7 days a week over taxing all capital gains as ordinary income (and then raising the ordinary income tax rate as well)
                Frankly I see no reason why we don't have the tax rates from the 60s. They were paid back then and no one screamed murder. The wealthy still managed to stay wealthy and out of the poor house.

                Comment


                • If you disagree with the specifics of a liability shield, that's all well and dandy, but exposing companies large and small to possibly trillions of dollars of downside risk for the next decade doesn't sound too smart.

                  The reason you don't have the 1960s tax code is the same reason you don't have the 1960s economic policy in general: the elites decided it didn't work very well and modified it for something different. Very few people actually paid those taxes, because the tax code was riddled with deductions that most people were able to use to reduce their ordinary income. Basically no ones taxes capital income as ordinary income, no one ever really did. The countries with broad social safety nets pay for them with broad income and sales taxes. That's how you should pay for similar schemes in the US, if you want those schemes.

                  I do have something against SS, it should come out of the general fund and funded by general revenue, the taxation should NOT come from payroll specific but income generally (and consumption and land value at the appropriate levels), and the statutory payroll tax should be an employee-side tax so citizens are aware of how much they are actually paying in taxes. If you want to continue to treat Social Security as a separate entity, set up a different funding mechanism for it, or increase the employee side portion of tax appropriately.

                  Either way, shielding companies from tail risk except for extreme negligence, structuring employment benefits so work is incentivized, and getting rid of the stupid fantasy accounting we use to hide how much we are taxing people are all totally fine things.
                  "The great questions of the day will not be settled by means of speeches and majority decisions but by iron and blood"-Otto Von Bismarck

                  Comment


                  • There is something fundamentally insane about a corporate liability shield to protect employers. As we've seen in places like Georgia, when you mandate companies reopening, you also eliminate unemployment (etc) benefits for workers who don't think it is safe to return to the job. Trading lives for state finances ... nice.

                    This isn't about financial incentives to return to work; everyone is tired of being at home. This is about being safe, keeping your family safe, and keeping a distance from those idiots who just don't get it.

                    Payroll tax cuts? Great, if you've got another way to pay for benefits, and if you've got a paycheck. Not so great for the rest of the universe. As for your views on social security, they amount to “Social Security for all,” which isn't currently the case. In other words, bigger government involvement in retirement planning.

                    The whole thing makes about as much sense as that idiot who said, “Kids need to go to school. They'll get sick, and they'll get over it. No big deal.”

                    Grandma, on the other hand, just got a death sentence.
                    Trust me?
                    I'm an economist!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by DOR View Post
                      Grandma, on the other hand, just got a death sentence.
                      No, Grandma should have gotten what she needed in the first place, solitary confinement. If you're not dressed like an Imperial Stormtrooper, you should not even be allowed to see Grandma. That's the thing that got me. We got it right for SARS (complete lock down for old age homes) and fucked it up royally here where caregivers don't even know the first step in decontamination.
                      Chimo

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by GVChamp View Post
                        If you disagree with the specifics of a liability shield, that's all well and dandy, but exposing companies large and small to possibly trillions of dollars of downside risk for the next decade doesn't sound too smart.

                        The reason you don't have the 1960s tax code is the same reason you don't have the 1960s economic policy in general: the elites decided it didn't work very well and modified it for something different. Very few people actually paid those taxes, because the tax code was riddled with deductions that most people were able to use to reduce their ordinary income. Basically no ones taxes capital income as ordinary income, no one ever really did. The countries with broad social safety nets pay for them with broad income and sales taxes. That's how you should pay for similar schemes in the US, if you want those schemes.

                        I do have something against SS, it should come out of the general fund and funded by general revenue, the taxation should NOT come from payroll specific but income generally (and consumption and land value at the appropriate levels), and the statutory payroll tax should be an employee-side tax so citizens are aware of how much they are actually paying in taxes. If you want to continue to treat Social Security as a separate entity, set up a different funding mechanism for it, or increase the employee side portion of tax appropriately.

                        Either way, shielding companies from tail risk except for extreme negligence, structuring employment benefits so work is incentivized, and getting rid of the stupid fantasy accounting we use to hide how much we are taxing people are all totally fine things.
                        I've seen this answer longer than you have been alive. To sum it up as it is always the same and that is "I got mine so screw you" Trump probably has that tattooed on his butt.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
                          I've seen this answer longer than you have been alive. To sum it up as it is always the same and that is "I got mine so screw you" Trump probably has that tattooed on his butt.
                          Sames.....

                          Also to the folks who deride people who would rather collect the extra $600 COVID a week than return to their hourly wage job....how about you look at what the hourly wage folks are earning and perhaps that needs to be raised to a more fair level.
                          “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                          Mark Twain

                          Comment


                          • There is nothing insane about arguing for some sort of liability shield, structuring unemployment benefits so there is an incentive to return to work, and cutting employer-side payroll taxes (which are always a good idea).

                            There is a problem with capital gains tax holidays, but since this is the 2020 Election thread and not the Corona thread, I'll take it 7 days a week over taxing all capital gains as ordinary income (and then raising the ordinary income tax rate as well)
                            the issue with the GOP proposals is that they are written as if the pandemic was already over, and the question now is how to get the economy going again.

                            this is insanity when US case numbers and deaths are going up vertically.
                            There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

                            Comment


                            • The majority of the economy either hasn't closed or has reopened. Cases aren't going vertical in all states. Most states have been engaged in some form of reopening for the last 2 months. Last May had the largest number of hires in the history of the United States. The economy obviously isn't at full employment and a lot of people are obviously not going back to work anytime soon, but there are still a huge number of people working and there are still a huge number of job openings. We've hired about 8% of our current heads in the last 3 months. I don't see how Congress spending some time to support that process is in any way insanity, and to the extent anything is insane, it's insane that it wasn't done a month ago.

                              Yes, when you decide to procrastinate, deadlines creep on you. If the deadline hits, you pass a bill to extend coverage another 2 weeks and then use that time to devise something different. Passing another multi-month extension is ridiculous.

                              Not interested in listening to the garbage arguments about how unfair the lowly proletariat is being treated. The majority of hourly workers you supposedly support are still working and paying taxes to support income replacement for people affected by COVID. Elected representatives have an ethical responsibility to not piss away their tax dollars. This remains true of the privilged people working from home: they are ALSO still working and ALSO paying taxes, and you don't have any less of an obligation to piss away THEIR money just because you think they are too wealthy.
                              "The great questions of the day will not be settled by means of speeches and majority decisions but by iron and blood"-Otto Von Bismarck

                              Comment


                              • I don't see how Congress spending some time to support that process is in any way insanity, and to the extent anything is insane, it's insane that it wasn't done a month ago.
                                trying to get people back to work when there's a pandemic that's rapidly escalating IS insane.

                                you crush the pandemic first, or at the minimum get it to manageable levels, and THEN you encourage people to get back into the workplace.
                                There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X