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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    You have to wonder just how aware Pence is of his situation.

    I mean, he's had to know for years that an utterly corrupt and amoral sociopath like Trump would not only demand a January 19th pardon from President Pence, but that he'd also stab Pence in the back before throwing his corpse under a speeding bus at any time and on the slightest whim...

    ...right? Pence is smart enough and aware enough to have figured these things out long ago, isn't he?
    Insert iffyhandwavering.gif here

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    Pence's one thing in his favor is a Constitutional Officer he can not be fired by Trump....otherwise he'd be gone.
    You have to wonder just how aware Pence is of his situation.

    I mean, he's had to know for years that an utterly corrupt and amoral sociopath like Trump would not only demand a January 19th pardon from President Pence, but that he'd also stab Pence in the back before throwing his corpse under a speeding bus at any time and on the slightest whim...

    ...right? Pence is smart enough and aware enough to have figured these things out long ago, isn't he?

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    I think we're getting really close to the "Russians are within 500 meters of the Führerbunker" stage.

    It's a mere 15 days until der treue Heinrich, er, Mike Pence commits the ultimate betrayal...and then almost certainly bolts out of the country after the last syllable is out of his mouth and stays there until after noon on January 20th.

    I have a funny feeling he won't play Gerald Ford for Trump...but who knows lol
    Pence's one thing in his favor is a Constitutional Officer he can not be fired by Trump....otherwise he'd be gone.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
    So now we are in for "The Longest Month".

    Honestly a coronary event would be useful in this one case of someone so absolutely devoid of any character.
    It would certainly be better than our current state: Any meaningful government work won't happen. Instead we'll get more batshit attempts to undermine the election and of course an executive order to make sure only "beautiful" buildings are built in D.C.

    Because millions of Americans aren't in danger of being thrown out of their homes, or scrambling to put food on the table (hey, here's $600, go nuts!), and there isn't a pandemic ravaging this country like a 9/11 every single goddamn day.

    But you know, "TDS" or whatever.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    So now we are in for "The Longest Month".

    Honestly a coronary event would be useful in this one case of someone so absolutely devoid of any character.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    The wheels are flying off...

    https://www.axios.com/trump-white-ho...3b18529c9.html

    Trump turns on everyone
    I think we're getting really close to the "Russians are within 500 meters of the Führerbunker" stage.

    It's a mere 15 days until der treue Heinrich, er, Mike Pence commits the ultimate betrayal...and then almost certainly bolts out of the country after the last syllable is out of his mouth and stays there until after noon on January 20th.

    I have a funny feeling he won't play Gerald Ford for Trump...but who knows lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    The wheels are flying off...

    https://www.axios.com/trump-white-ho...3b18529c9.html

    Trump turns on everyone


    Jonathan Swan
    Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

    President Trump, in his final days, is turning bitterly on virtually every person around him, griping about anyone who refuses to indulge conspiracy theories or hopeless bids to overturn the election, several top officials tell Axios.

    The latest: Targets of his outrage include Vice President Pence, chief of staff Mark Meadows, White House counsel Pat Cipollone, Secretary of State Pompeo and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

    Why it matters: Trump thinks everyone around him is weak, stupid or disloyal — and increasingly seeks comfort only in people who egg him on to overturn the election results. We cannot stress enough how unnerved Trump officials are by the conversations unfolding inside the White House.

    Top officials are trying to stay away from the West Wing right now.
    • Trump is lashing out, and everyone is in the blast zone: At this point, if you're not in the “use the Department of Homeland Security or the military to impound voting machines” camp, the president considers you weak and beneath contempt.
    • Trump is fed up with Cipollone, his counsel. Some supporters of Cipollone are worried that Trump is on the brink of removing him and replacing him with a fringe loyalist.

    A source who spoke to Trump said the president was complaining about Pence and brought up a Lincoln Project ad that claims that Pence is "backing away" from Trump. This ad has clearly got inside Trump’s head, the source said.
    • Trump views Pence as not fighting hard enough for him — the same complaint he uses against virtually everybody who works for him and has been loyal to him.

    Pence’s role on Jan. 6 has begun to loom large in Trump’s mind, according to people who’ve discussed the matter with him.
    • Trump would view Pence performing his constitutional duty — and validating the election result — as the ultimate betrayal.

    A new fixation: Trump has even been asking advisers whether they can get state legislatures to rescind their electoral votes. When he’s told no, he lashes out even more, said a source who discussed the matter with the president.
    • And in an Oval meeting Monday night, Trump spoke with House Republicans about voting to overturn the result on Jan. 6 — a desperate vote that even Trump has privately acknowledged he's bound to lose.

    The person who has the worst job in Washington, according to multiple administration officials: the incoming head of the Justice Department, Jeffrey Rosen.
    • The consensus is he has no earthly idea the insanity he is in for.
    • The next month will be the longest of his life.
    Obtained by Axios
    Another reflection of Trump’s state of mind:
    • As Axios reported Monday night, the president got his personal assistant to email Republican lawmakers a PowerPoint slide (above) attacking McConnell for being "the first one off the ship," and absurdly claiming credit for the Senate majority leader’s victory in his Kentucky re-election.
    • That's quite a message to send two weeks out from crucial runoff races in Georgia, where Republicans need to stay unified.

    Where's Jared? A source told Axios that Kushner, who yesterday participated in a tree-planting ceremony in Jerusalem Forest's Grove of Nations, "is focused on the Middle East."
    • It's a perfect visual encapsulation of Kushner's absence — on the other side of the world, planting a tree with Bibi and accepting plaudits, while Trump discusses mayhem with Sidney Powell.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Excellent rundown of the Four Seasons fiasco, too much post here entirely, but the best part was this:

    It’s hard to know what counts as a fuckup when you work for Donald Trump. Looked at by the standards of a traditional campaign with a traditional candidate who possesses a minor-to-moderate capacity for traditional human feelings, like shame, what happened at Four Seasons Total Landscaping, or the fact that it happened at all, was a disaster.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Newsmax Fact-Checks Its Own Smartmatic Lies Following Legal Threats

    Fledgling pro-Trump cable-news network Newsmax ran a point-by-point debunking of numerous election-fraud conspiracies about voting software company Smartmatic on Monday, days after the firm issued a threat of legal action and demand for retraction over the network peddling falsehoods about the company.

    In two separate segments during Monday’s broadcast of John Bachman Now, hosts John Bachman and John Tabacco both issued lengthy statements offering fact-checks about claims made that Smartmatic was involved in an international conspiracy to flip millions of votes from President Donald Trump to President-elect Joe Biden.

    “Since Election Day various guests, attorneys, and elected officials have appeared on Newsmax and offered opinions and claims about Smartmatic and Dominion systems. Both companies that offer voting software in the U.S.,” the statement began. “And Newsmax would like to clarify its news coverage and note that it has not reported as true certain claims made about these companies.”

    From there, both hosts noted that their viewers “should be aware of Newsmax has found no evidence that either dominion or Smartmatic owns the other or has any business association with each other,” assertions that have been repeated consistently by Trump lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell.

    “We have no evidence that Dominion uses Smartmatic software or vice versa,” the fact-check continued. “No evidence has been offered that Dominion or Smartmatic used software or reprogrammed software that manipulated votes in the 2020 election. Smartmatic has stated that its software was only used in the 2020 election in Los Angeles, was not used in any battleground state contested by the Trump campaign. Newsmax has no evidence to the contrary.”

    The statement concluded by pointing out that Newsmax also has no proof that Dominion or Smartmatic have any relationship with liberal philanthropist George Soros and that Smartmatic is not owned by long-deceased Venezuelan dictator Huge Chavez.

    “Smartmatic states it has no operations in Venezuela,” the hosts declared. “While the company did election projects in Venezuela from 2004 to 2017, it states it never was founded by Hugo Chavez, nor did it have a corrupt relationship with him or the Venezuelan government.”

    Powell and other Trump allies have insisted, without any evidence whatsoever, that Chavez, Soros and Smartmatic were involved in a shadowy plot to “steal” the election from Trump by using algorithms to change Trump votes to Biden. Powell’s various “Kraken” lawsuits have been tossed out of state and federal courts around the country.

    Newsmax also quietly published the statement on its website over the weekend. Newsmax’s on-air fact-checks of the wild claims made on its own network follow Fox News airing a similar debunking of the Smartmatic election fraud conspiracies on three of its programs over the weekend.

    While Smartmatic’s lawyers have sent forceful letters to Fox News, Newsmax and One America News demanding that they clear the company’s name and prepare for legal action, Dominion Voting Systems has issued a similar threat to the Trump campaign and Powell.
    First Amendment lawyers, meanwhile, believe that both companies have “extremely powerful” cases.

    “The repeated accusations against both companies are plainly defamatory and surely have done enormous reputational and financial harm to both,” famed attorney Floyd Abrams told the New York Times on Sunday.
    ___________

    Wh..what in the actual f--k is happening?? First Lou Dobbs, now Newsmax. What Is Going On??

    I must be having a stroke, because after the last 4+ years of a consequence-free right-wing tsunami of ridiculous lies...suddenly they've found the truth?

    Oh right, lawsuits. And lawsuits = financial pain.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Is Trump Cracking Under the Weight of Losing?

    Donald Trump has never had a week like the week he just had. On the heels of the Supreme Court’s knock-back and the Electoral College’s knockout, some of his most reliable supporters—Mitch McConnell, Vladimir Putin, Newsmax—acknowledged and affirmed the actual fact of the matter. Trump is a loser.

    Consequently, he is plainly out of sorts, say former close associates, longtime Trump watchers and mental health experts.

    It’s not just his odd behavior—the testy, tiny desk session with the press, the stilted Medal of Freedom ceremony that ended with his awkward exit, the cut-short trip to the Army-Navy football game. It’s even more pointedly his conspicuous and ongoing absences. The narcissistic Trump has spent the last half a century—but especially the last half a decade—making himself and keeping himself the most paid-attention-to person on the planet. But in the month and a half since Election Day, Trump has been seen and heard relatively sparingly and sporadically. No-showing unexpectedly at a Christmas party, sticking to consistently sparse public schedules and speaking mainly through his increasingly manic Twitter feed, he’s been fixated more than anything else on his baseless insistence that he won the election when he did not.

    Over the course of a lifetime of professional and personal transgressions and failures, channeling lasting, curdled lessons of Norman Vincent Peale and Roy Cohn, Trump has assembled a record of rather remarkable resilience. His typical level of activity and almost animal energy has at times lent him an air of insusceptibility, every one of his brushes with financial or reputational ruin ending with Trump emerging all but untouched. His current crisis, though, his eviction from the White House now just a month out, is something altogether different and new.

    “He’s never been in a situation in which he has lost in a way he can’t escape from,” Mary Trump, his niece and the author of the fiercely critical and bestselling book about him and their family, told me. “We continue to wait for him to accept reality, for him to concede, and that is something he is not capable of doing,” added Bandy Lee, the forensic psychiatrist from Yale who’s spent the last four years trying to warn the world about Trump and the ways in which he’s disordered and dangerous. “Being a loser,” she said, for Trump is tantamount to “psychic death.”

    The combination of an unprecedented rebuke meeting an uncommonly vulnerable ego has some people wondering if there is a chance that Trump’s unusual actions suggest something potentially more dire. Could he be on his way to a mental breakdown?

    Sam Nunberg dismissed the notion. “No,” the former Trump political aide said in a text.

    Same with Anthony Scaramucci, who very briefly and semi-famously was his top White House spokesperson. “No chance,” he said.

    But that’s not consensus. Louise Sunshine, for instance, has known Trump longer than just about anybody. She started working with him in the early 1970s—so I sent her a text asking her the question. “Maybe,” she responded.

    Everybody, after all, has a breaking point. “And he’s not indestructible,” said Barbara Res, a former Trump Organization executive vice president who was the construction manager for Trump Tower and just wrote a book called Tower of Lies. “I do think Trump is struggling,” Tony Schwartz, the actual author of The Art of the Deal, told me, “and that this is far and away the toughest time he’s ever had.”

    “His fragile ego has never been tested to this extent,” Michael Cohen, his former personal attorney and enforcer before he turned on him, told me. “While he’s creating a false pretense of strength and fortitude, internally he is angry, depressed and manic. As each day ends, Trump knows he’s one day closer to legal and financial troubles. Accordingly, we will all see his behavior deteriorate until it progresses into a full mental breakdown.”

    “Psychological disorders are like anything else,” said Mary Trump, who’s also a psychologist. “If they’re unacknowledged and untreated over time, they get worse.”

    In Lee’s estimation, it’s not something that could happen. It’s something that is happening, that’s been happening for the past four years—and will keep happening.

    “His pathology has continued to grow, continued to cause him to decompensate, and so we’re at a stage now where his detachment from reality is pretty much complete and his symptoms are as severe as can be.” She likened Trump to “a car without functioning brakes.” Such a car, she explained, can look for a long time like it’s fine, and keep going, faster and faster, even outracing other cars. “But at the bottom of the hill,” Lee said, “it always crashes.”


    Trump is who and how he is first and foremost because of his parents. His unwell mother couldn’t and didn’t give him the attention he wanted and needed, while his domineering father gave him attention but a wrong and warping kind—instilling in him a grim, zero-sum worldview with the dictate that the only option was to be “a winner.” Ever since, he responded so relentlessly to these harsh particulars of his loveless upbringing—the insatiable appetite for publicity, the crass, constant self-aggrandizement—that he became the president of the United States and arguably the most famous person alive. But from the time he was a boy, the way Trump has coped with the void he’s felt ultimately has been less a solution than a spotlight—it’s what’s made his most fundamental problem most manifest.

    “His problem is that he has grown up with vulnerability in terms of his self-worth, self-esteem and a clear sense of himself,” Mark Smaller, a past president of the American Psychoanalytic Association, told me. “Somebody with these kinds of vulnerabilities, affirmation, being the center of things, is never enough. Because you can’t solve these old wounds, these old, narcissistic wounds—you cannot solve them with affirmation, with being at the center of things. You can’t because they persist, so that you need more attention, you need more affirmation, you need to be more at the center of things, all the time, more often. And when realities start to interfere with getting that kind of affirmation, you just want more.”

    The only moment in Trump’s life that remotely compares to what’s happening right now is in early 1990.

    He was mired in a tabloid-catnip marital breakup on account of an affair with the B-movie actress who eventually would become the second of his three wives and the mother of the fourth of his five children. He also was a staggering $3.4 billion in debt—personally liable for nearly a billion of that—his business affairs in New York and with his casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in absolute shambles. “I would have been looking for the nearest building to jump off of,” Steve Bollenbach, the financial fixer banks made Trump hire, once told biographer Tim O’Brien. That spring, according to Vanity Fair, Trump ordered in burgers and fries and stayed up late in bed, staring at the ceiling. At risk of becoming a has-been and a punchline, Trump nonetheless boasted about future prospects—of national magazine covers and a comeback to come. “All Donald knew,” Wayne Barrett wrote around the time, “was that he was still a story.”

    He sat at his desk paging through periodicals looking for his name. “Even if it was the same AP article in every single newspaper, he wanted to see it,” former Trump casino executive Jack O’Donnell told me. “That’s how he survives.”

    “Did he collapse? No. He did not collapse,” veteran New York Democratic strategist Hank Sheinkopf said. “He just continued.”

    Trump was able to do that, of course, principally due to the sprawling, near-foolproof safety net his father’s wealth allowed. Lenders in New York and regulators in Atlantic City, too, let him skate, both groups as beholden to him as he was to them.

    Still, en route to averting comeuppance, he proceeded to weave this self-inflicted calamity into a preferred tale of a certain toughness he possessed. “Most people would have been in the corner sucking their thumb,” he said to a reporter from the Sunday Times of London. “You learn that you’re either the toughest, meanest piece of shit in the world, or you just crawl into a corner, put your finger in your mouth, and say, ‘I want to go home,’” he told a writer from New York. “You never know until you’re under pressure how you’re gonna react.”

    But the biggest difference between then and now: Even when Trump was all but broke, even as bankers clawed back some of his “toys,” the “props for the show,” as he once put it in Playboy, they gave him an obscene $450,000-a-month allowance. And the most important thing? He got to keep Trump Tower. He got to remain living in the penthouse of the building that he had built, that had made him famous, and that served above all as the preeminent stage for how he wanted to be seen.

    “He was always there in his office,” Alan Marcus, Trump’s publicist later on in the ‘90s, told me. “He was always there in his castle.”

    This time, on the other hand, he’s getting kicked out. No more Oval Office photo ops. No more two-scoop nights watching Fox News in his room in the residence. In a month’s time, for most likely the last time, the door of the White House will close behind him.

    This looming reality colors his interactions in these waning days.

    Earlier this month, the Medal of Freedom ceremony to honor Dan Gable, the fabled Iowa wrestler and coach, seemed precisely the sort of pomp Trump liked the most throughout his single term. “He couldn’t stand the feeling of losing,” he said of Gable, reading from prepared remarks, standing behind the lectern festooned with the presidential seal, surrounded by Gable, Gable’s family and members of Congress from Iowa, reporters and photographers.

    “Before matches,” Trump continued, “Dan would repeat the words ‘cakes, carries, ducks, picks, shucks, sweeps’ over and over again. I’ll have to ask Dan why. Why, Dan?”

    “Because they’re all moves that end the match,” Gable said.

    “Oh,” Trump said.

    Toward the end of the event, though, when one of the reporters asked if he was still “looking to change the outcome of the election,” Trump called the election “rigged” and the United States “third-world” before turning to thank Gable again—and then abruptly walked out.

    Gable, seeming surprised and still standing in the Oval, looked at the gathered press and held his hands up. He said all that was left to say.

    “He’s gone.”

    “So,” Brian Kilmeade of Fox asked Trump last weekend in one of the vanishingly few interviews the president has consented to since he lost, “would you show up at the inauguration. Will you?”

    “I don’t want to talk about that,” Trump said. “I want to talk about this: We’ve done a great job. I got more votes than any president in the history of our country—in the history of our country, right? Not even close: 75 million”—actually a little more than 74—“far more than Obama, far more than anybody. And they say we lost an election. We didn’t lose.”

    This is true, obviously, only if one ignores the more than 81 million people who voted for Joe Biden and the 306 Electoral College votes he was awarded as a result.

    The people who’ve known Trump well, the people who’ve watched him for a long, long time, the mental health professionals—they’re worried, they told me, about what’s to come, in the next month, and in the months and years after that.

    “There’s no reckoning with reality,” biographer Gwenda Blair said. “He’s going to continue to frame it that he won, he was cheated, he’s the victim, and he’s going to continue to bend reality as best he can.”

    “He’ll continue to rage against the results, and he’ll continue to solidify in the minds of millions more Americans that the democratic process was corrupted, and that’s going to have a long-lasting tail that we’ll have to deal with in American politics for many, many years,” said Miles Taylor, the former chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security who was “Anonymous” before he revealed his identity in October. “I don’t expect that the president is going to chain himself to the Resolute Desk and refuse to leave, but also, given what we’ve seen the past few weeks, I wouldn’t totally put it past him.”

    “The probability of something very bad happening is very high, unacceptably high, and the fact that we don’t have guardrails in place, the fact that we are allowing a mentally incapacitated president to continue in the job, in such an important job, for a single day longer, is a truly unacceptable reality,” said Lee, the Yale psychiatrist. “We’re talking about his access to the most powerful military on the planet and his access to technology that’s capable of destroying human civilization many times over.”

    “You have to remember,” said Cohen, his former attorney. “Trump doesn’t see things the way that you do. He sees things in his distorted reality that benefits him. He’s able to right now embrace that distorted reality because he still wakes up in the White House. But what happens each and every day as he gets closer to not only leaving, but also it comes with a sense of, in his mind, humiliation, right? And he knows that he is destined for legal troubles.”

    “He’s looking down the barrel” of legal and financial difficulties, Mary Trump said. “But perhaps more troubling for him or more terrifying for him is the fact that he is in danger of losing his relevance.”

    And that is not something Trump will ever be able to abide.

    “He’s going to go back to Mar-a-Lago, to MAGAstan, as I call it, and he’s going to return to standing ovations and applause beyond what you can comprehend,” Cohen said, “because these sycophants that are there will continue to bolster his ego and he can go from table to table, listening to people placate him about how the election was stolen from him. And that’s just going to further create that mishigas in his head.”

    “Do I think that Trump is going to fall apart in a way where he would become completely dysfunctional and not leave his room? I don’t think so,” said Smaller, the past president of the psychoanalytic association. “But if you’re in this kind of unregulated state, and I think that’s what we’re observing, he’ll do kind of desperate things to maintain that being the center of attention.”

    “He will not go away, because this is his psychological lifeline,” Lee said.

    “For him,” she stressed, “it’s a matter of psychic survival.”
    ___________

    Could go either way in my humble opinion. He's certainly never been in this perfect shit storm of setbacks and problems.

    But as I've often said, time is not on this man's side.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Barr says no basis for special counsel to investigate election, no federal authority to seize voting machines

    Attorney General William Barr said Monday he has seen no reason for a special counsel to investigate possible fraud in the November election, contradicting an idea proposed by President Donald Trump.

    Barr, who is set to step down on Wednesday, said, "if I thought a special counsel was appropriate I would name one, and I haven't."

    "I said there was not enough fraud to affect the election and I stand by that," he said, noting what he said in an AP interview shortly before informing Trump during a White House meeting that he would resign.

    Barr also said there is no federal authority to seize voting machines used in key states, as Trump's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, has suggested he order.

    “I see no basis now for seizing machines by the federal government, you know, a wholesale seizure of machines by the federal government," he said.

    During a Friday meeting with Trump at the White House, a source said, Guiliani, lawyer Sydney Powell and retired Gen. Michael Flynn discussed an executive order to seize and examine voting machines across the country.

    Trump invited Powell to consider the possibility that she be appointed a special counsel and be given high-level security clearances to investigate the 2020 election. The meeting was highly contentious, sources told ABC News, filled with screaming and demands from Powell, who called other Trump aides "quitters" for giving up the fight.

    The meeting ended with White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, White House counsel Pat Cipollone and other Trump attorneys talking the president out of making the offer, the sources said. Giuliani, who joined the meeting by phone, also opposed the idea, according to sources.

    Powell did not respond to ABC News' request for comment. She was at the White House Sunday as well, but the reason was unclear.

    Barr's candid comments came when he answered reporters' questions at an unrelated news conference.
    _____________

    Considering how Trump and his Cult feel about traitors to the Dear Leader, Barr better grow eyes in the back of his head

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    As Eric said, he's doing the Trumpian thing: State "some people are saying" -- insert something outrageous -- "but I'm not calling for that" to ensure CYA.

    And of course retweet something without any commentary whatsoever "I was just retweeting...I didn't even look at the entire tweet...I had no idea blah blah blah"

    It's like dealing with small children except these clowns are twice as transparent.
    I get it Joe

    But someone needs to remind him of both points....cause he doesn't seem to get it.

    If the next Administration gets a wild hair...or he oversteps further...these could be articles within overall legal proceedings.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    Does Flynn not realize:

    2. that as a retired lieutenant general he is still subject to the Uniformed Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and can be recalled to active duty for a court martial and be charged for Article 94? Once you become a general officer in the US Army a whole set of privileges come with that...but so do some special provisions which make you more responsible for your actions after your retirement from active duty.
    As Eric said, he's doing the Trumpian thing: State "some people are saying" -- insert something outrageous -- "but I'm not calling for that" to ensure CYA.

    And of course retweet something without any commentary whatsoever "I was just retweeting...I didn't even look at the entire tweet...I had no idea blah blah blah"

    It's like dealing with small children except these clowns are twice as transparent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    I just have to ask: How did you pull this from what Flynn actually said and has been saying all along? The man has been hinting at, support and calling for martial law and using the military to overturn a free and fair election.

    Where exactly (or even vaguely) is there a "blatant mischaracterization of Flynn's view"? I am seriously baffled at how you're able to come to that conclusion.
    Does Flynn not realize:

    1. his pardon only covers previous malfeasance and nothing new?

    2. that as a retired lieutenant general he is still subject to the Uniformed Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and can be recalled to active duty for a court martial and be charged for Article 94? Once you become a general officer in the US Army a whole set of privileges come with that...but so do some special provisions which make you more responsible for your actions after your retirement from active duty.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by GVChamp View Post

    Is there anything that should have changed my mind? I gather there was a NY Times article about it, but I imagine it's behind a paywall. Nothing in DOR's CNN snippet convinces me to change my mind and I boycott CNN so I won't click on the link to see more.

    I could actively research, but the last time I did that I had to dig through a massive pile of muck generated by the outrage machine to find the actual video. What's the point? And the actual news stories today are the COVID strain out of the UK and the CDC vaccine recommendations. The latter is pretty gosh-darn important considering a bunch of official CDC documentation and guidance looked like they were about to recommend letting grandma die.

    Don't see anything to update my opinion and don't see any reason I should be looking to change my mind. I SHOULD look more into this new covid strain, but between the PVC Cement and the bleach, I don't think I'm going to form great opinions on that right now, and I'd rather form great opinions than bad opinions I have to later unmake.
    Why not just look at that Newsmax interview where he said two different things in the Trumpian fashion, as Astralis so adroitly defined it? No additional research needed.

    I mean, you were pretty adamant that there was a blatant mischaracterization of Flynn's view and typical journalistic malpractice. Do you still feel that way?

    Leave a comment:

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