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  • Ron Johnson tried to hand fake elector info to Mike Pence on Jan. 6, panel reveals
    A top aide to the Wisconsin Republican said the senator wanted to give the former vice president the list of pro-Trump electors as part of the electoral counting process that certified Joe Biden's win.

    A top aide to Sen. Ron Johnson attempted to arrange a handoff of false, pro-Trump electors from the senator to Mike Pence just minutes before the then-vice president began to count electoral votes on Jan. 6, 2021.

    The aide, Sean Riley, told Pence’s legislative director Chris Hodgson that Johnson wanted to hand Pence lists of the fake electors from Michigan and Wisconsin for Pence to introduce during the counting of electoral votes that certified Joe Biden’s win.
    The attempt was revealed in text messages obtained by the Jan. 6 select committee during its fourth public hearing on Tuesday.

    “Do not give that to him,” Hodgson replied.
    The attempted handoff shows just how much former President Donald Trump and his allies tried to lean on Pence to introduce false slates of electors that could have thrown the 2020 election from Biden to Donald Trump. The committee laid out an intense pressure campaign, led primarily by Trump and his attorney Rudy Giuliani, to push state legislatures to appoint pro-Trump electors and override the will of voters in their states.

    In video and live testimony, state legislative leaders in Pennsylvania, Arizona and Michigan — all Republicans — described repeated, sometimes daily pressure from Trump and his allies in the aftermath of the 2020 election. Michigan State Senate leader Mike Shirkey recalled in video testimony how, after Trump tweeted out his phone number, he received thousands of messages from Trump supporters asking him to appoint Michigan’s electors through the legislature.

    Arizona State House speaker Rusty Bowers rejected similar pressure from Trump.

    “You are asking me to do something that is counter to my oath,” he recalled saying.

    The panel drew a direct connection between the events of Jan. 6 and the months-long effort by Trump and Giuliani to browbeat state legislative leaders. Even without the compliance of those lawmakers, Trump pushed the Republican National Committee to help identify and coordinate false slates of electors in the states.

    In fact, Trump had called RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel and handed the phone to attorney John Eastman, an architect of Trump’s plan to remain in power, according to newly revealed video of her testimony to the committee. Eastman urged her to help identify false electors to meet and cast votes for Trump on Dec. 14, 2020, when the legitimate members of the Electoral College were required to meet and vote.
    “He turned the call over to Mr. Eastman, who then proceeded to talk about the importance of the RNC helping the campaign gather contingent electors in case legal challenges that were ongoing change the result,” McDaniel said in video testimony.

    Under Trump’s plan, Pence would be presented with competing slates of electors — the official results certified by the governors and those certified by state legislators — and he would assert the extraordinary power to choose which slates to count. But no state legislature responded to Trump’s demand, and Pence, without any genuine controversy, rejected the scheme as illegal.

    The legality of the plan was at the heart of Tuesday afternoon’s hearing, led in part by panel member Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.).

    “The system held, but barely,” Schiff said in his opening remarks.

    During the hearing, another theme emerged: State legislative leaders pleaded with Trump and Giuliani for any evidence to support their sweeping claims of fraud and irregularities. But Giuliani, while insisting the evidence existed, never provided it. Trump attorneys Cleta Mitchell and Eastman discussed the absence of such evidence in emails on Jan. 2 and Jan. 3.

    Notably, Johnson held his own hearing on purported election fraud in mid-December 2020 and was accused by Democrats of spreading misinformation.

    Trump-aligned lawyers concocted the effort, leaning on fringe constitutional theory and the guidance of Eastman. He acknowledged in emails obtained by the select committee that the Pence plan would be “dead on arrival” without the backing of state legislatures — yet he pushed ahead anyway, suggesting that the confusion around alternate electors would give Pence enough cover to act.

    Trump’s own White House counsel’s office also raised doubts about the plan, according to testimony released by the select panel in court filings. And in the days before Jan. 6, Pence’s chief counsel Greg Jacob engaged in an intense debate with Eastman, contending that not a single justice of the Supreme Court would back his plan — a point he said Eastman reluctantly conceded.

    Other witnesses testified about Trump’s pressure on Tuesday, including Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, whom Trump famously told on Jan. 2, 2021, to help him “find” the 11,000 votes he needed to win the state. Neither Raffensperger nor GOP legislators in Georgia complied with Trump’s push, and his effort in Georgia triggered an ongoing investigation by the Fulton County district attorney.

    Members of Trump’s inner circle began contemplating the notion of turning to state legislatures even before the election was called for Biden. On Nov. 5, 2020, Mitchell — who had been leading preelection preparations for Trump’s legal team — reached out to Eastman with a request.

    “John — what would you think of producing a legal memo outlining the constitutional role of state legislators in designating electors?” Mitchell wondered. “Rather than governors, the US Constitution vests that responsibility with state legislators. … why couldn’t legislatures reclaim that constitutional duty, and designate the electors — rather than delegating to governors.”

    Eastman wrote a memo later that month, which was then forwarded to the Oval Office by Trump campaign attorney Jenna Ellis, according to documents obtained by the Jan. 6 select committee. As Trump’s legal challenges to the election began to fail and states began certifying Biden’s victory, Eastman began consulting directly with state legislators, encouraging some to simply retabulate their popular votes in order to show Trump in the lead.

    The goal was ultimately to present Pence with an apparent controversy: competing slates of electors certified by different government bodies — governors and legislators. Jacob, Pence’s chief counsel, told the vice president at the time that had any state legislatures certified an alternative slate the outcome might’ve been different.

    “A reasonable argument might further be made that when resolving a dispute between competing electoral slates, Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution places a firm thumb on the scale on the side of the State legislature,” he wrote in a memo obtained by POLITICO.

    Even as rioters swarmed the Capitol on Jan. 6 and sent Pence, Jacob and lawmakers into hiding, Eastman leaned on Pence to single-handedly delay the count of electoral votes, citing the possibility that the Pennsylvania legislature would reconvene and adopt an alternative slate. But Pence and his team came to view the delay as a violation of the Electoral Count Act, the law that governs the transfer of power and the counting of electoral votes.

    Eastman’s correspondence throughout the post-election period, including with another pro-Trump lawyer Kenneth Chesebro, shows the two grappling with the challenge of convincing state legislatures to adopt Trump slates of electors and building it into their plans. The two men helped contemplate the Trump campaign’s effort to assemble pro-Trump electors to meet on Dec. 14, 2020, and cast ballots as though they were the true electors from their states. Those false certificates have drawn scrutiny from federal prosecutors. Eastman and other Republicans have contended that those meetings were necessary in case any courts sided with Trump and tipped the outcome in his favor.
    _____________

    How 'bout them mules, eh?
    Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

    Comment


    • Georgia election officials dismantle bogus Trump claim about secret suitcase of ballots

      In her opening statement on Tuesday, Jan. 6 select committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney said that “we cannot let America become a nation of conspiracy theories.” The committee later heard testimony from Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and Georgia election official Gabriel Sterling that debunked one of former President Donald Trump’s most pervasive election claims — that a suitcase of fraudulent ballots cost him victory in the state in 2020.

      Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who played a central role in Trump’s impeachment hearings and also sits on the committee, handled the questioning of Raffensperger and Sterling, and laid out the essence of Trump’s conspiracy theory about the suitcase.

      “This story falsely alleges that sometime during election night, election workers at the State Farm Arena in Atlanta, Ga., kicked out poll observers. After the observers left, the story goes, these workers pulled out so-called suitcases of ballots from under a table and ran those ballots through counting machines multiple times,” Schiff said. “Completely without evidence, President Trump and his allies claimed that these suitcases contained as many as 18,000 ballots, all for Joe Biden. None of this was true.”

      Asserting that video of the counting of votes at State Farm Arena revealed the fraudulent processing of ballots, Trump and his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani pressured Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, Raffensperger, Sterling and state lawmakers to declare the results invalid in that must-win swing state.

      “What did the tape actually show?” Schiff asked Sterling.

      “This conspiracy theory took on a life of its own, where they conflated a water main break that wasn’t a water main break and throwing observers out and a series of other things, when it actually showed was Fulton County election observers engaging in normal ballot processing,” Sterling responded. “One of the specific things, one of the things that was very frustrating, was the so-called suitcases of ballots from under the table.”

      Sterling testified that, in fact, there was no suitcase shown on the video.

      “They’re standard ballot carriers that allow for seals to be put on them so that they are tamper-proof,” he testified.

      Raffensperger began his testimony by noting that “President Biden carried the state of Georgia by approximately 12,000 votes,” and that digital and hand recounts, as well as a forensic audit of the election, had confirmed that result.

      “Three counts, all remarkably close, which showed that President Trump did come up short,” Raffensperger said.

      In a December 2020 phone call played during Monday’s hearing, Raffensperger told the president that his theory about the suitcase of ballots was not true.

      “We did an audit of that and proved conclusively that they were not scanned three times,” Raffensperger can be heard telling the president.

      Schiff played video testimony about the so-called suitcase given to the committee that began with statements by former U.S. Attorney B.J. Pak, whom former Attorney General William Barr had instructed to investigate the claims.

      “I listened to the tapes and reviewed the videotapes myself [and found] that there was nothing there. Giuliani was wrong,” Pak said of the suitcase theory.

      “The Fulton County allegations had no merit,” Barr testified before the committee.

      Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue also testified about a phone conversation he had with Trump about the suitcases.

      “He kept fixating on the suitcase that supposedly had fraudulent ballots and that the suitcase was rolled out from under the table, and I said, ‘No, sir, there is no suitcase. You can watch that video over and over. There is no suitcase. There is a wheeled bin...”

      During his call with Raffensperger, Trump proposed other conspiracy theories that he said explained his election loss to Biden, including a rumor that 5,000 dead people had voted in Georgia. Like the suitcase, the accusation about dead people turned out to be more fiction than fact.

      “We had many allegations, and we investigated every single one of them,” Raffensperger told the committee.

      _____

      Wait, was this before or after the 2000 mules did their thing? I'm having trouble keeping up with all these idiot conspiracy theories....
      Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

      Comment


      • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
        Georgia election officials dismantle bogus Trump claim about secret suitcase of ballots

        In her opening statement on Tuesday, Jan. 6 select committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney said that “we cannot let America become a nation of conspiracy theories.” The committee later heard testimony from Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and Georgia election official Gabriel Sterling that debunked one of former President Donald Trump’s most pervasive election claims — that a suitcase of fraudulent ballots cost him victory in the state in 2020.

        Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who played a central role in Trump’s impeachment hearings and also sits on the committee, handled the questioning of Raffensperger and Sterling, and laid out the essence of Trump’s conspiracy theory about the suitcase.

        “This story falsely alleges that sometime during election night, election workers at the State Farm Arena in Atlanta, Ga., kicked out poll observers. After the observers left, the story goes, these workers pulled out so-called suitcases of ballots from under a table and ran those ballots through counting machines multiple times,” Schiff said. “Completely without evidence, President Trump and his allies claimed that these suitcases contained as many as 18,000 ballots, all for Joe Biden. None of this was true.”

        Asserting that video of the counting of votes at State Farm Arena revealed the fraudulent processing of ballots, Trump and his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani pressured Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, Raffensperger, Sterling and state lawmakers to declare the results invalid in that must-win swing state.

        “What did the tape actually show?” Schiff asked Sterling.

        “This conspiracy theory took on a life of its own, where they conflated a water main break that wasn’t a water main break and throwing observers out and a series of other things, when it actually showed was Fulton County election observers engaging in normal ballot processing,” Sterling responded. “One of the specific things, one of the things that was very frustrating, was the so-called suitcases of ballots from under the table.”

        Sterling testified that, in fact, there was no suitcase shown on the video.

        “They’re standard ballot carriers that allow for seals to be put on them so that they are tamper-proof,” he testified.

        Raffensperger began his testimony by noting that “President Biden carried the state of Georgia by approximately 12,000 votes,” and that digital and hand recounts, as well as a forensic audit of the election, had confirmed that result.

        “Three counts, all remarkably close, which showed that President Trump did come up short,” Raffensperger said.

        In a December 2020 phone call played during Monday’s hearing, Raffensperger told the president that his theory about the suitcase of ballots was not true.

        “We did an audit of that and proved conclusively that they were not scanned three times,” Raffensperger can be heard telling the president.

        Schiff played video testimony about the so-called suitcase given to the committee that began with statements by former U.S. Attorney B.J. Pak, whom former Attorney General William Barr had instructed to investigate the claims.

        “I listened to the tapes and reviewed the videotapes myself [and found] that there was nothing there. Giuliani was wrong,” Pak said of the suitcase theory.

        “The Fulton County allegations had no merit,” Barr testified before the committee.

        Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue also testified about a phone conversation he had with Trump about the suitcases.

        “He kept fixating on the suitcase that supposedly had fraudulent ballots and that the suitcase was rolled out from under the table, and I said, ‘No, sir, there is no suitcase. You can watch that video over and over. There is no suitcase. There is a wheeled bin...”

        During his call with Raffensperger, Trump proposed other conspiracy theories that he said explained his election loss to Biden, including a rumor that 5,000 dead people had voted in Georgia. Like the suitcase, the accusation about dead people turned out to be more fiction than fact.

        “We had many allegations, and we investigated every single one of them,” Raffensperger told the committee.

        _____

        Wait, was this before or after the 2000 mules did their thing? I'm having trouble keeping up with all these idiot conspiracy theories....
        It was before the Kraken went to 4 Seasons Landscaping to pick up mulch.
        “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
        Mark Twain

        Comment


        • Jan. 6 hearing: Trump wanted DOJ to 'just say the election was corrupt,' former officials say

          In testimony before the Jan. 6 committee Thursday, former Justice Department officials described a 90-minute phone call in late December 2020 with then-President Donald Trump during which Trump pleaded with them to declare that the election was "corrupt" despite being told his claims of fraud were false.

          During the Dec. 27, 2020, phone call with then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue, Trump raised a litany of false allegations about voter fraud. The former officials told the panel that they had investigated every claim and found they had no merit, but that Trump continued to peddle them.

          Donoghue said he tried in vain to "educate" Trump.

          "I felt in that conversation it was incumbent to make it clear to the president what our investigations had revealed," Donoghue recalled. "I wanted to try to cut through the noise, because it was clear to us that there were a lot of people whispering in his ear feeding him these conspiracy theories and I felt that being very blunt in that conversation might help make it clear to the president that these allegations were simply not true."

          Donoghue said that as Trump went through an "arsenal of allegations," he told the president, "No, that is false," one by one, in "a serial fashion as he moved from one theory to another."

          Among the allegations Donoghue said Trump was "so fixated on" was a report that claimed there was a 68% error rate in one Michigan county's ballot-counting machines. Donoghue said that a hand recount showed there was one error in more than 15,000 votes cast.

          Donoghue said he informed the president of the 0.0063% error rate.

          "So that, Mr. President, is an example of what people are telling you that is not true," Donoghue recalled telling Trump.

          The committee displayed handwritten notes Donoghue took during the conversation with Trump.

          At one point, according to the notes, Rosen told Trump that "the DOJ can't and won't snap its fingers and change the outcome of the election."

          "That's not what I'm asking you to do," Trump replied. "What I'm asking you to do is just say that the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican congressmen."



          Slides showing Donoghue's notes are displayed during Thursday's select committee hearing. (House TV)

          "We have an obligation to tell people that this was an illegal, corrupt election," Trump continued, according to Donoghue's notes.

          Donoghue said that while there were "isolated" instances of voter fraud, "none of them came close" to affecting the outcome of the election.

          The hearing was the fifth in a series of presentations by the House select committee of findings stemming from its 11-month investigation of the events surrounding the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.

          Thursday’s panel specifically focused on Trump’s efforts to pressure the Justice Department to help him subvert his election loss in the weeks leading up to the insurrection.
          _____

          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

          Comment


          • Bill Barr says he's 'not sure we would have had a transition at all' to Biden if DOJ hadn't investigated Trump's baseless voter fraud claims
            Former Attorney General William Barr said he was "not sure we would have had a transition at all" if the Justice Department had not investigated Donald Trump's claims of widespread voter fraud and found them baseless.

            In a closed-door deposition, Barr suggested to the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the US Capitol that Trump might not have left office voluntarily if DOJ had not proactively examined the election fraud claims ahead of Joe Biden's inauguration.

            "I sort of shudder to think what the situation would have been if the position of the department was: We're not even going to look at this until after Biden's in office," Barr said in the recorded deposition, a portion of which the committee aired Thursday at a hearing focused on Trump's effort to pressure the Justice Department to advance his false election fraud claims.

            Barr sat for a deposition with the House January 6 committee in early June, shortly before the congressional panel began holding public hearings. The House committee has featured footage from that interview prominently, turning Barr — who said he would vote for Trump again over a Democrat — into an unlikely star of the high-profile hearings.

            At the first hearing, on June 9, the House committee played footage from Barr's deposition in which the former attorney general recalled telling Trump that his election claims were "bullshit."

            On Thursday, the committee played a portion of the deposition in which investigators asked Barr why he had authorized election fraud investigations at all rather than "follow the regular course of action and let the investigations occur much later in time."

            Barr said he believed the "responsible thing to do was to be in a position to have a view as to whether or not there was fraud."

            "Frankly, I think the fact that I put myself in the position that I could say that we had looked at this and didn't think there was fraud was really important," he added.
            ______

            Trump and his apologists have so much to answer for, it's hard to know where to begin.
            Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

            Comment


            • Trump Now Claims He Won Wisconsin Since State Court Has Restricted Ballot Drop Boxes

              Former President Donald Trump is now desperately attempting to snatch Wisconsin from the jaws of his defeat by suddenly claiming he won the state in the 2020 presidential election.

              He didn’t.

              His reasoning? Since the Wisconsin state Supreme Court issued a ruling Friday sharply curtailing the number of drop boxes for absentee ballots, that must mean all the votes in those boxes in November 2020 were somehow fake — and apparently were all marked for victor Joe Biden.

              “This means I won the very closely contested (not actually) Wisconsin Presidential race because they used these corrupt and scandal-ridden Scam Boxes,” he falsely insisted in a post Friday on Truth Social.


              (Photo: Screen Shot/Truth Social/Donald Trump)


              There is no evidence that the vote in Wisconsin, or anywhere else in the nation, was fraudulent. Dozens of court cases and several recounts state by state verified Biden’s victory.

              Members of Trump’s own Department of Justice found no evidence of fraud after extensive investigations. Trump’s handpicked attorney general, William Barr, called the election fraud claims “bullshit.”


              “These allegations were simply not true,” Richard Donoghue, the acting deputy attorney general at the time, told Trump, he testified last month before the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection. He added that Trump eventually said: “Just say the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican congressmen.”

              Trump and Republicans have claimed that drop boxes facilitated cheating but have offered no evidence.

              The conservative-controlled Wisconsin court ruled that under current law, absentee ballot drop boxes may only be placed in election offices and that no one other than the voter can return a ballot in person. “Ballot drop boxes appear nowhere in the detailed statutory system for absentee voting,” Justice Rebecca Bradley wrote.

              There’s no move in Wisconsin to switch Biden’s victory to Trump.

              Critics say the GOP goal is to significantly decrease the number of votes, which is generally considered beneficial to Republicans. One way to do that it to make voting as inconvenient as possible.

              Trump said on Fox News in 2020 that “you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again” if “voting levels” rose. (Research has shown, however, that mail-in ballots don’t appear to give either party a distinct advantage.)

              Trump continues to push for single-day, in-person voting in elections — prohibiting convenient mail-in ballots and early voting that 69% of American voters used in 2020. (Trump votes by mail.) That would be challenging especially for the disabled and the elderly, as well as for those working long hours or two jobs or juggling child care.

              “Ultimately, we want same-day voting — one day — and only paper ballots,” Trump said to cheers at a rally in Nashville last month.
              __________

              "Ultimately, we need massive voter suppression in order to win elections"

              Time for Hair Furor to take a nice long rest somewhere....say, Bellevue perhaps.

              Although, at least he's got an excuse. There's countless idiots that are still obediently bleating "Oh my stars! Another Big Steal Conspiracy Theory! I need to examine this carefully and withhold judgement until then!"
              Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

              Comment


              • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                "Ultimately, we need massive voter suppression in order to win elections"

                Time for Hair Furor to take a nice long rest somewhere....say, Bellevue perhaps.

                Although, at least he's got an excuse. There's countless idiots that are still obediently bleating "Oh my stars! Another Big Steal Conspiracy Theory! I need to examine this carefully and withhold judgement until then!"
                Contrast that with my county of Contra Costa which uses lots of drop boxes scattered about the County for ballots. We also use several manned locations where you can drop them off if you want. Probably one within a few miles of every one of our 1.162 million residents. Of course, you can still drop in any USPS mailbox or leave on your mailbox for the postal worker to pick up when delivering your mail like I do. Easy as can be as it should be since it is everyone's right to vote. Cheating is not at these boxes but at the restrictions put in place to prevent the use of these methods.

                and I still would like to punch Trump in the nose...

                Comment


                • Idaho Republicans poised to reject 2020 election results
                  BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The Idaho Republican Party will consider 31 resolutions at its three-day convention starting Thursday, including one already adopted by Texas Republicans that President Joe Biden isn’t the legitimate leader of the country.

                  The Idaho resolution in the deeply conservative state that Donald Trump won with 64% of the vote in 2020 is nearly identical to the Texas resolution that was passed last month, stating: “We reject the certified results of the 2020 presidential election; and we hold that acting president Joseph Robinette Biden was not legitimately elected by the people of the United States.”

                  Both the Idaho and Texas resolutions contend that secretaries of state circumvented their state legislatures, even though both states have Republican secretaries of state.

                  Jim Jones, a former chief justice of the Idaho Supreme Court as well as a former Republican state attorney general, called the resolution rejecting the 2020 presidential election results “asinine,” noting multiple courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, rejected attempts to overturn the election.

                  “(The Idaho Republican Party) has gotten so caught up in conspiracy theories, meaningless culture war issues, that they have quit being able to function as a meaningful political party,” he said. “We have got to get away from this authoritarian streak that has infected the Idaho Republican Party, as well as a good part of the nation, because it’s absolutely tearing our country apart.”


                  Idaho's resolution goes further than the Texas resolution in that it falsely states that audits found the vote count for the 2020 election to be fraudulent in Wisconsin and Arizona.

                  In Wisconsin, election fraud claims have been dismissed by courts or rejected by the state's bipartisan election commission.

                  In Arizona, where Republicans submitted a slate of fake electors, Trump supporters hired inexperienced consultants to run “a forensic audit” that was discredited. FBI agents looking into events surrounding Trump’s efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss recently subpoenaed the Republican Arizona Senate president, who orchestrated a discredited review of the election.

                  MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, a Trump ally, even accused Idaho of allowing election fraud. But the Idaho secretary of state said a partial recount of ballots validated the accuracy of the 2020 results.

                  Jaclyn Kettler, a Boise State University political scientist, said revisiting the 2020 election by different state or local Republican party officials “seems to be an issue that is commanding a lot of attention still in the Republican party. It may continue to cast doubt on our elections and increase fears of voters that their votes are not being counted.”

                  Among the other proposed Idaho Republican Party resolutions this week is one calling for not recognizing “imaginary identities,” a resolution aimed at transgender people.

                  Multiple resolutions involve voting, several focusing on people not deemed sufficiently Republican voting in Republican primaries.

                  One resolution, titled “A Resolution to Protect Rural Representation,” calls for changing Idaho’s system for statewide elections into a national-style electoral college, a process that sometimes leads to candidates winning without receiving the most votes.

                  Trump, for example, in 2016 defeated Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton by winning more electoral college votes despite losing the popular vote by about 3 million votes. The proposed system for Idaho would tally electoral votes from counties. Such a change in Idaho would require changing the state’s constitution.

                  Another proposed resolution calls for privatizing Idaho Public Television, a long-time target of far-right Republicans.

                  The Idaho Republican Party will also elect officers during the gathering. First-term incumbent Chair Tom Luna, who served two terms as the state's schools chief, is being challenged by Republican Rep. Dorothy Moon. Moon ran unsuccessfully in the Republican primary in May for secretary of state, contending the 2020 presidential election was fraudulent and Biden wasn't president.

                  Mainstream Idaho Republicans, who would be considered far-right in many states, have dominated the state for three decades. But they have become targets of far-right members of their own party and labeled as RINOs — Republican in name only.

                  The May primary was a mixed bag for the two groups, and the power struggle will likely continue at the convention.

                  In the primary, first-term incumbent Gov. Brad Little crushed Trump-backed Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin, and most other statewide races went to more mainstream Idaho Republicans. But Raul Labrador, a favorite of the Tea Party during his eight years in the U.S. House, defeated five-term Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, well known for a strategy of simply calling balls and strikes that oftentimes irked his Republican colleagues when he gave them legal advice they didn't want to hear.

                  Several far-right lawmakers in the House lost their seats, but the Senate turned decidedly more conservative with mainstream losses that included the co-chairman of the legislature's powerful budget-setting committee.
                  ___

                  Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                  Comment


                  • Conservative group finds ‘absolutely no evidence of widespread fraud’ in 2020 election

                    Eight prominent conservatives released a 72-page report Thursday refuting claims of election fraud in the 2020 presidential election in dozens of unsuccessful court cases brought forth by former President Trump and his allies.

                    The group — which includes former federal judges, Republican senators and Republican-appointed officials — said they reviewed all 64 court cases Trump and his allies initiated challenging the election outcome, saying they had reached an “unequivocal” conclusion that the claims were unsupported by evidence.

                    “We conclude that Donald Trump and his supporters had their day in court and failed to produce substantive evidence to make their case,” the group wrote.

                    The eight conservatives repeatedly condemned the election fraud claims, but said they have not changed their allegiance to the Democratic Party and have no “ill will” toward Trump nor his supporters.

                    The group consists of former Sen. John Danforth (R-Mo.); longtime Republican lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg; former federal Judge Thomas Griffith; David Hoppe, chief of staff to former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.); former federal judge J. Michael Luttig; former federal judge Michael McConnell; Theodore Olson, solicitor general under former President George W. Bush; and former Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.).

                    “We urge our fellow conservatives to cease obsessing over the results of the 2020 election, and to focus instead on presenting candidates and ideas that offer a positive vision for overcoming our current difficulties and bringing greater peace, prosperity and liberty to our nation,” the group wrote.

                    The Hill has reached out to a Trump spokesperson for comment.

                    The group’s report includes an analysis of the claims in each court case challenging the election results in six swing states President Biden narrowly won in 2020: Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

                    The cases included unfounded widespread claims of improperly counted ballots, rigged voting machines, mail-in ballot irregularities, ineligible voters who cast ballots and officials who blocked access for observers in polling places.

                    The claims have also been a focus of numerous investigations, including the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and a criminal investigation led by the Fulton County, Ga., district attorney.

                    Two members of the group, Ginsberg and Luttig, have testified publicly before the House panel. Luttig served as an informal adviser to then-Vice President Mike Pence in the lead-up to Jan. 6, telling Pence he could not constitutionally overturn the Electoral College votes.

                    The eight conservatives acknowledged the election administration was not “perfect” Thursday, noting a relatively small number of cases where authorities found irregularities.

                    “But there is absolutely no evidence of fraud in the 2020 presidential election on the magnitude necessary to shift the result in any state, let alone the nation as a whole,” they wrote.

                    “In fact, there was no fraud that changed the outcome in even a single precinct,” the report continued. “It is wrong, and bad for our country, for people to propagate baseless claims that President Biden’s election was not legitimate.”


                    Beyond the court cases, the conservatives’ report also discussed post-election reviews conducted outside of the legal system by the six swing states, all of which the group said also “failed to support” Trump’s allegations.

                    In one example, the group noted the Arizona’s state Senate’s review of Maricopa County election results, which was conducted by private firm Cyber Ninjas. The firm’s final analysis found 99 additional votes for Biden and 261 fewer votes for Trump, according to the report.

                    Cyber Ninjas later shut down after a judge ordered it to pay $50,000 per day in fines until it turned over public records to The Arizona Republic.

                    In another example, the conservatives referenced a full manual recount of Georgia ballots by Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger (R), which confirmed Biden’s victory in the state.

                    Trump had pressured Raffensperger in a now-infamous call to “find” enough votes to reverse Biden’s victory in the state.

                    “There is no principle of our republic more fundamental than the right of the people to elect our leaders and for their votes to be counted accurately,” the conservatives wrote. “Efforts to thwart the people’s choice are deeply undemocratic and unpatriotic.”
                    _________

                    These conservatives will be promptly branded as "RINOs" or "left/extreme left" by Cult45
                    Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                    Comment


                    • These conservatives will be promptly branded as "RINOs" or "left/extreme left" by Cult45


                      These 8 folks are about as rock-ribbed Republican Conservatives as they come. Ted Olsen, who lost his wife on September 11 when United Flight 11 she was on smashed into the Pentagon, was an acolyte of Justice Scalia. These folks have also stood by their party. I may disagree with much of their politics but these guys believe in America & the Constitution, something...well, you know...
                      “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                      Mark Twain

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                      • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                        These conservatives will be promptly branded as "RINOs" or "left/extreme left" by Cult45


                        These 8 folks are about as rock-ribbed Republican Conservatives as they come. Ted Olsen, who lost his wife on September 11 when United Flight 11 she was on smashed into the Pentagon, was an acolyte of Justice Scalia. These folks have also stood by their party. I may disagree with much of their politics but these guys believe in America & the Constitution, something...well, you know...
                        All of which is meaningless now of course.
                        Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                        Comment


                        • No major problems with ballot drop boxes in 2020, AP finds

                          ATLANTA (AP) — The expanded use of drop boxes for mailed ballots during the 2020 election did not lead to any widespread problems, according to an Associated Press survey of state election officials across the U.S. that revealed no cases of fraud, vandalism or theft that could have affected the results.

                          The findings from both Republican- and Democratic-controlled states run contrary to claims made by former President Donald Trump and his allies who have intensely criticized their use and falsely claimed they were a target for fraud.


                          Drop boxes are considered by many election officials to be safe and secure, and have been used to varying degrees by states across the political spectrum. Yet conspiracy theories and efforts by Republicans to eliminate or restrict them since the 2020 election persist. This month, the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s conservative majority ruled that drop boxes are not allowed under state law and can no longer be widely used.

                          Drop boxes also are a focal point of the film “2,000 Mules,” which used a flawed analysis of cellphone location data and ballot drop box surveillance footage to cast doubt on the results of the 2020 presidential election.

                          In response to the legislation and conspiracy theories surrounding drop boxes, the AP sent a survey in May to the top elections office in each state seeking information about whether the boxes were tied to fraudulent votes or stolen ballots, or whether the boxes and the ballots they contained were damaged.

                          All but five states responded to the questions.

                          None of the election offices in states that allowed the use of drop boxes in 2020 reported any instances in which the boxes were connected to voter fraud or stolen ballots. Likewise, none reported incidents in which the boxes or ballots were damaged to the extent that election results would have been affected.

                          A previous AP investigation found far too few cases of potential voter fraud in the six battleground states where Trump disputed his loss to President Joe Biden to affect the outcome.

                          A number of states — including Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas — said they do not allow the use of drop boxes. Some had not allowed them before the 2020 election, when the coronavirus pandemic prompted wider use of mailed ballots. In states where they are used, secretaries of state or election commissioners may not be aware of every incident involving a drop box if it was not reported to their office by a county or other local jurisdiction.

                          Drop boxes have been a mainstay in states with extensive mail voting for years and had not raised any alarms. They were used widely in 2020 as election officials sought to provide alternative ways to cast ballots with the COVID-19 outbreak creating concerns about in-person voting. The boxes also gave voters a direct method for submitting their ballots, rather than sending them through the U.S. Postal Service and worrying about delivery delays.

                          Starting months before the 2020 presidential election, Trump and his allies have made a series of unfounded claims suggesting that drop boxes open the door to voter fraud. Republican state lawmakers, as part of their push to add new voting restrictions, have in turn placed rules around when and where the boxes could be accessed.

                          Arizona Assistant Secretary of State Allie Bones said drop boxes are “safe and secure” and might even be considered more secure than Postal Service mailboxes. She said bipartisan teams in the state collect ballots from the drop boxes and take them directly to secure election facilities, following so-called chain-of-custody protocols.

                          “Not to say that there’s anything wrong with USPS, and I think they do a great job as well, but the hysteria around ballot drop boxes I think is just a made-up thing to create doubt and fear,” Bones said.

                          Arizona has had robust mail-in voting for years that includes the use of drop boxes, and in the AP survey, the state reported no damage, stolen ballots or fraud associated with them in 2020. Nevertheless, Trump-aligned lawmakers in the state pushed for legislation that would ban drop boxes, but were stymied by Democrats and several Republicans who disagreed with the strategy.

                          Utah is a state controlled by Republicans that also has widespread use of mailed ballots and no limits on the number of drop boxes a county can deploy. Jackson Murphy, spokesman for Lt. Gov. Deidre Henderson, a Republican who is the state’s top election official, said in the AP survey that Henderson encourages counties to make secure drop boxes accessible to voters.

                          Of the states responding to the survey, 15 indicated that drop boxes were in use before 2020 and 22 have no limits on how many can be used in this fall’s election. At least five states take the extra step of setting a minimum number of drop boxes required.

                          Republican-led Florida and North Dakota and Democratic-led New York did not respond. Montana and Virginia did, but did not answer the survey questions related to the 2020 election.

                          Last year, five states added new restrictions to ballot drop boxes, according to research by the Voting Rights Lab. That included Georgia, where President Joe Biden won a narrow victory and where drop boxes were allowed under an emergency rule prompted by the pandemic.

                          Georgia Republicans say their changes have resulted in drop boxes being a permanent option for voters, requiring all counties to have at least one. But the legislation, which includes a formula of one box per 100,000 registered voters, means fewer will be available in the state’s most populous communities compared with 2020.

                          Iowa lawmakers last year approved legislation to limit drop boxes to one per county. Previously, state law did not say how many drop boxes counties could use. This year, Louisiana, Missouri and South Carolina have passed laws effectively prohibiting drop boxes, according to the Voting Rights Lab, which researches state election law changes.

                          Along with incidents recorded in news reports, the AP survey found a handful of cases in 2020 in which drop boxes were damaged.

                          Officials in Washington state said there were instances when drop boxes were hit by vehicles, but that no ballot tampering had been reported. Massachusetts election officials said one box was damaged by arson in October 2020 but that most of the ballots inside were still legible enough for voters to be identified, notified and sent replacements.

                          A drop box also was set on fire in Los Angeles County in 2020, but a local election official said the vast majority of the ballots that were damaged were able to be recovered and voters provided new ballots. Another drop box in California was temporarily closed because of a wildfire.

                          “The irony is they were put in place to respond to a problem with the post office and make sure people had a secure way of returning their ballots,” said Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat. “And so there’s no actual legitimate concern except for, again, potential external threats or people who have been radicalized through misinformation to try to tamper with drop boxes to make a point.”

                          North Carolina provides an example of how deep-seated the misinformation has become. The state does not allow drop boxes and did not use them during the 2020 election.

                          “And despite that fact, people are still claiming drop box fraud must have occurred in North Carolina,” said Patrick Gannon, public information director for the State Board of Elections. “You can’t make this up. Oh wait. Yes, you can.”


                          In Wisconsin, Republicans had supported the use of drop boxes before Trump seized on mailed ballots as part of his unsubstantiated claim that the 2020 election was stolen from him. The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that found ballot drop boxes were not allowed under state law also said no one other than the voter can return their ballot in person to a local clerk’s office or alternate site.

                          Some voters said they were frustrated by the ruling.

                          Kelly O’Keefe Boettcher of Milwaukee said she cast her ballot in a drop box in 2020 because of safety concerns during the pandemic and is upset that they’ll no longer be an option for her or for voters who are less able to get to the polls.

                          “Drop boxes are accessible; they are egalitarian,” she said. “To watch them go, I feel, people can say it’s not voter suppression. But it is.”

                          Wisconsin state Rep. Tim Ramthun, a Republican candidate for governor, reintroduced a resolution this past week for the GOP-controlled Legislature to decertify Biden’s victory there, adding the state Supreme Court ruling on drop boxes as one reason to do so. Trump also renewed his calls for decertification in Wisconsin, citing the ruling.

                          According to the AP survey, the Wisconsin Elections Commission said it is not aware of any cases in 2020 in which drop boxes were damaged, had submitted ballots stolen or destroyed, or were used for fraudulent ballots.

                          “Isn’t a mailbox a secure place to put a letter?” asked Dave Wanninger, who with his wife used a ballot drop box in a Milwaukee public library in 2020. “Why would a drop box be any different?”
                          ___
                          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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                          • Trump ignores Republican calls to avoid repeating false election claims

                            WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Donald Trump ignored pressure from some fellow Republicans to avoid repeating his false claims about a stolen 2020 election on Tuesday, insisting that he won his second bid for the White House and would not allow his perceived enemies to bar a return.

                            In his first speech in Washington since leaving office 18 months ago, the former U.S. president stopped short of declaring his candidacy in the 2024 presidential election but predicted Republicans would retake the Senate, House of Representatives and the White House.

                            "I ran the first time and I won. Then I ran a second time and I did much better ... and you know what? That's going to be the story for a long time, what a disgrace it was. But we may just have to do it again," Trump said in a 93-minute speech to the conservative America First Policy Institute.

                            Mike Pence, who was vice president under Trump and may seek the White House in 2024, distanced himself from Trump's repeated election falsehoods, saying at a separate event earlier in the U.S. capital that conservatives needed to focus on the future to win.

                            "I don't know that the president and I differ on issues. But we may differ on focus. I truly do believe that elections are about the future," Pence said across town at the Heritage Foundation think tank.

                            "In order to win, conservatives need to do more than criticize and complain. We must unite our movement behind a bold, optimistic agenda," he said.

                            Trump used his speech to paint a picture of an America plagued by crime, violence, drugs and invasions of illegal migrants. He predicted a future federal government controlled by Republicans that he said should impose the death penalty on drug dealers, use the National Guard to stop violence in states and cities and relocate the urban homeless to tent encampments on the outskirts of U.S. cities.

                            Last week the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, assault on the U.S. Capitol depicted Trump as ignoring pleas of family and aides to intervene as he watched his supporters on live TV attack the seat of Congress for hours in a failed bid to stop certification of his loss.

                            Trump dismissed the panel as "hacks and thugs."

                            "They really want to damage me so I can no longer go back to work for you. And I don't think that's going to happen," Trump said.

                            Trump remains the leading figure in the Republican Party. But while he flirts with a 2024 presidential run, his standing has weakened slightly, with some 40% of Republicans saying he is at least partly to blame for the Jan. 6 riot compared with 33% in a poll conducted as the hearings got under way six weeks ago, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll.

                            The Jan. 6 committee is trying to build a case that Trump's efforts to overturn his defeat by Democrat Joe Biden in November 2020 constitute dereliction of duty and illegal conduct, rendering him unfit to return to the White House.

                            Waning popularity could encourage potential rivals to run, including Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, who is among those maneuvering for possible Republican primary challenges in 2024.

                            Signs of new momentum have emerged in a U.S. Justice Department probe into the Capitol assault and an alleged scheme by Trump allies to overturn the election with fake electors.

                            Former top Pence aide Marc Short last week became the highest profile official to appear before a federal grand jury investigating the two issues.
                            __________

                            I see Fuckface Von Clownshoe continues to go all in with his Mein Kampf routine....

                            But but but whatabout Hunter Biden's laptop!!
                            Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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                            • Arizona AG says most alleged 2020 dead voters were alive

                              PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said Monday his investigators found just one dead voter after thoroughly reviewing findings from a partisan review of the 2020 election that alleged 282 ballots were cast in the name of someone who had died.

                              The finding by the Republican attorney general, who is running for U.S. Senate in Tuesday's primary, further discredits the review conducted last year. The review was led by an inexperienced firm, Cyber Ninjas, and conducted largely by supporters of Donald Trump who falsely believe the election was stolen from him.

                              “Our agents investigated all individuals that Cyber Ninjas reported as dead, and many were very surprised to learn that they were allegedly deceased,” Brnovich wrote in a letter to state Senate President Karen Fann, who used her subpoena power to obtain ballots, tabulators and election data and hired Cyber Ninjas for what she called a “forensic audit.”

                              Brnovich did not say whether any charges had been filed in connection with the one substantiated incident, and his spokesman, Ryan Anderson, did not respond to a phone call and text message. All other people listed by Cyber Ninjas as deceased “were found to be current voters," Brnovich wrote.

                              Combined with other reports of dead voters, Brnovich’s Election Integrity Unit investigated a combined 409 names and produced “only a handful of potential cases.”

                              Brnovich vouched for the legitimacy of the election immediately after President Joe Biden's victory but later publicized his investigation of the Cyber Ninjas allegations as he sought Trump's endorsement for his Senate campaign. Trump ultimately released a scathing statement saying Brnovich wasn't doing enough to advance his claims of fraud and endorsed businessman Blake Masters.

                              Federal and state election officials and Trump’s own attorney general have said there is no credible evidence the election was tainted. The former president’s allegations of fraud were also roundly rejected by courts, including by judges Trump appointed.

                              The Cyber Ninjas review looked at data, machines and ballots from Maricopa County, the state's largest. It produced a report that experts described as riddled with errors, bias and flawed methodology. Still, even that partisan review came up with a vote tally that would not have altered the outcome, finding that Biden won by 360 more votes than the official results.
                              _____

                              The problem is that they got the wrong company to do the audit. They were supposed to get Mutant Ninja Turtles, but they were booked, so they had to use fake ninja turtles.
                              Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                                The problem is that they got the wrong company to do the audit. They were supposed to get Mutant Ninja Turtles, but they were booked, so they had to use fake ninja turtles.
                                I wonder how he will fare in today's GOP primary...interested to see the results.
                                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                                Mark Twain

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