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The US 2020 Presidential Election & Attempts To Overturn It

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by statquo View Post

    One thing I’ve noticed across the board is this “falsely claimed” usage. It was a lie. They fucking lied. They’re still lying. Lie, lied, lying. Call it what it is
    That's goddamn right.

    Leave a comment:


  • statquo
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    Conservative group tells judge it has no evidence to back its claims of Georgia ballot stuffing


    FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020 photo, Cobb County Election officials prepare for a recount, in Marietta, Ga. A conservative group that claimed to uncover a ballot trafficking scheme in Georgia has told a judge it has no evidence to back up its allegations. Texas-based group True the Vote in complaint filed with Georgia's secretary of state said it had spoken to several people with knowledge of coordinated efforts to collect and deposit ballots in drop boxes during 2020 and 2021 elections.

    SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — A conservative group has told a Georgia judge that it doesn't have evidence to support its claims of illegal ballot stuffing during the the 2020 general election and a runoff two months later.

    Texas-based True the Vote filed complaints with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in 2021, including one in which it said it had obtained “a detailed account of coordinated efforts to collect and deposit ballots in drop boxes across metro Atlanta” during the November 2020 election and a January 2021 runoff.

    A Fulton County Superior Court judge in Atlanta signed an order last year requiring True the Vote to provide evidence it had collected, including the names of people who were sources of information, to state elections officials who were frustrated by the group's refusal to share evidence with investigators.

    In their written response, attorneys for True the Vote said the group had no names or other documentary evidence to share.

    “Once again, True the Vote has proven itself untrustworthy and unable to provide a shred of evidence for a single one of their fairy-tale allegations," Raffensperger spokesman Mike Hassinger said Wednesday. "Like all the lies about Georgia’s 2020 election, their fabricated claims of ballot harvesting have been repeatedly debunked.”


    True the Vote’s assertions were relied upon heavily for “2000 Mules,” a widely debunked film by conservative pundit and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza. A State Election Board investigation found that surveillance camera footage that the film claimed showed ballot stuffing actually showed people submitting ballots for themselves and family members who lived with them, which is allowed under Georgia law.

    The election board subpoenaed True the Vote to provide evidence that would assist it in investigating the group's ballot trafficking allegations.

    True the Vote's complaint said its investigators "spoke with several individuals regarding personal knowledge, methods, and organizations involved in ballot trafficking in Georgia.” It said one person, referred to in the complaint only as John Doe, “admitted to personally participating and provided specific information about the ballot trafficking process.”

    Frustrated by the group's refusal to share evidence, Georgia officials took it to court last year. A judge ordered True the Vote to turn over names and contact information for anyone who had provided information, as well as any recordings, transcripts, witness statements or other documents supporting its allegations.

    The group came up empty-handed despite having “made every additional reasonable effort to locate responsive items,” its attorneys David Oles and Michael Wynne wrote in a Dec. 11 legal filing first reported Wednesday by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.


    True the Vote's founder and president, Catherine Engelbrecht, didn't immediately respond to an Associated Press email seeking comment Wednesday. She and another member of the group were briefly jailed in 2022 for contempt for not complying with a court order to provide information in a defamation lawsuit. The suit accused True the Vote of falsely claiming that an election software provider stored the personal information of U.S. election workers on an unsecured server in China.

    Prior to the State Election Board's investigation, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation looked into True the Vote's assertion that it was able to use surveillance video and geospatial mobile device information to support its allegations. In a September 2021 letter, Vic Reynolds, who was then the GBI's director, said the evidence produced did not amount to proof of ballot harvesting.

    State elections officials opened their own investigation after receiving True the Vote's complaint two months later. When pressed to provide names of sources and other documentation, the group last year tried to withdraw its complaint. One of its attorneys wrote that a complete response would require True the Vote to identify people to whom it had promised confidentiality.

    The State Election Board refused to shelve the complaint and went to court to force True the Vote to turn over information.

    In addition to names, the judge ordered True the Vote to provide copies of any confidentiality agreements it had with sources.

    The group's attorneys replied: “TTV has no such documents in its possession, custody, or control.”
    ____________

    One thing I’ve noticed across the board is this “falsely claimed” usage. It was a lie. They fucking lied. They’re still lying. Lie, lied, lying. Call it what it is

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    “More indictments await”: Experts say Jan. 6 architect’s secret tweets may lead to "felony charges”


    Kenneth Chesebro

    Right-wing attorney Kenneth Chesebro, one of the key architects of former President Donald Trump’s Jan. 6 fake elector scheme, concealed a secret Twitter account from Michigan prosecutors that was filled with posts that undercut his statements to investigators about his role in Trump’s election subversion scheme, according to CNN.

    Chesebro denied having a Twitter account or any “alternate IDs” when asked by Michigan prosecutors last year, according to recordings of his interview obtained by the outlet.

    But CNN’s K-FILE linked Chesebro to a secret account — BadgerPundit — based on matching details, including biographical information about his work and travels as well as his family and investments.

    The posts show that before the election and days after polls closed, Chesebro promoted a “far more aggressive election subversion strategy than he later let on in his Michigan interview,” CNN reported.

    Chesebro’s attorneys confirmed to CNN that the account belonged to Chesebro, calling it his “random stream of consciousness” where he was “spitballing” theories about the election but argued that it was separate from his legal work for Trump’s campaign.

    “When he was doing volunteer work for the campaign, he was very specific and hunkered-down into being the lawyer that he is, and gave specific kinds of legal advice based on things that he thought were legitimate legal challenges, versus BadgerPundit, who is this other guy over there, just being a goof,” Chesebro’s attorney Robert Langford told the outlet.

    Chesebro, who framed himself as a moderate go-between who was pulled in deeper by Trump’s extremist lawyers, has not been charged with any crimes in Michigan.

    “Our team is interested in the material and will be looking into this matter,” a spokesman for the Michigan attorney general’s office told CNN.

    Chesebro claimed to investigators that the so-called fake elector plot was just a contingency in case Trump’s team won any of the election lawsuits, which they ultimately failed to do. He claimed to Michigan prosecutors that he told the Trump team that “state legislatures have no power to override the courts.”

    But BadgerPundit argued that the litigation did not matter and that Republican-controlled state legislatures had the power to send their own electors.

    “You don’t get the big picture. Trump doesn’t have to get courts to declare him the winner of the vote. He just needs to convince Republican legislatures that the election was systematically rigged, but it’s impossible to run it again, so they should appoint electors instead,” BadgerPundit wrote on Nov. 7, 2020, days after President Joe Biden was projected as the election winner.

    Chesebro claimed to prosecutors that he saw “no scenario” in which then-Vice President Mike Pence could “count any vote for any state because there hadn’t been a court or a legislature in any state backing any of the alternate electors.”

    BadgerPundit tweeted more than 50 times that Pence had the power to count the alternate electors, according to CNN.

    Chesebro also claimed that he was “misled” by the Trump campaign concealing the entire plan for him and claimed he only realized they planned to deploy the fake electors regardless of what happened with the lawsuits. But on Twitter, he shared an Atlantic article citing a “Trump legal adviser” who described the full plan.

    Chesebro’s attorneys acknowledged to CNN that “there’s clearly a conflict” between some of the tweets and what he told prosecutors, but argued that some of his online theories were “inconsistent” with legal advice he gave the Trump campaign.

    Though Chesebro has not been charged in Michigan, he agreed to plead guilty in the Fulton County, Ga., RICO case to one felony count and gave proffer interviews to prosecutors. Chesebro was also identified as an unindicted co-conspirator in the federal D.C. election subversion case.

    “Chesebro appears to have pursued a legally perilous path in his dealings with Michigan authorities,” Ryan Goodman, a law professor at New York University, told CNN. “The Twitter posts strongly suggest Chesebro committed the crime of making false statements to investigators… his entire cooperation agreement may now fall apart.”

    Goodman added that it appears that Chesebro “hid highly important evidence in the form of these social media posts from the investigators,” which could put him at “great legal risk.”

    “We should have asked for clarity, and that was our screw-up,” Chesebro attorney Manny Arora acknowledged to CNN when asked about his client denying his Twitter account. Arora added that he has since provided “all the information on BadgerPundit” to investigations in “all the different states that are involved.”

    But CNN legal analyst Elie Honig, a former federal prosecutor, argued that the news further undercuts Chesebro’s value to prosecutors in Georgia.

    "Kenneth Chesebro is facing more legal jeopardy now, and he is not and never has been a viable cooperator for prosecutors in Georgia,” he said Monday, arguing that Chesebro’s statements to investigators were “misleading at best, outright false at worst.”

    Honig called Chesebro’s attorneys’ defense “utterly nonsensical.”

    "He is not a viable cooperator for the Fulton County D.A.," Honig added. "They gave Kenneth Chesebro a softball deal. They let him plead out to probation. And the reason they gave us well, he's cooperating, no he is not, he has not come clean. He is a failed cooperator. That's a black eye for the Georgia district attorney as well."

    Longtime Harvard legal scholar Laurence Tribe predicted that “more indictments await” following the Twitter revelation.

    “Chesebro’s secret Twitter account could lead to serious felony charges in Michigan and will augment his eventual federal indictment by Jack Smith,” Tribe tweeted. “The guy is in a huge heap of trouble that his guilty plea in Georgia barely touches.”
    ______

    Be interesting to see if this really does lead to additional criminal charges

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    True The Vote = Project VERITAS
    Yeahbut2000Mules!!

    GPS accuracy good enough for prosecutors and all that sort of thing...

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    True The Vote = Project VERITAS

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Conservative group tells judge it has no evidence to back its claims of Georgia ballot stuffing


    FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020 photo, Cobb County Election officials prepare for a recount, in Marietta, Ga. A conservative group that claimed to uncover a ballot trafficking scheme in Georgia has told a judge it has no evidence to back up its allegations. Texas-based group True the Vote in complaint filed with Georgia's secretary of state said it had spoken to several people with knowledge of coordinated efforts to collect and deposit ballots in drop boxes during 2020 and 2021 elections.

    SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — A conservative group has told a Georgia judge that it doesn't have evidence to support its claims of illegal ballot stuffing during the the 2020 general election and a runoff two months later.

    Texas-based True the Vote filed complaints with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in 2021, including one in which it said it had obtained “a detailed account of coordinated efforts to collect and deposit ballots in drop boxes across metro Atlanta” during the November 2020 election and a January 2021 runoff.

    A Fulton County Superior Court judge in Atlanta signed an order last year requiring True the Vote to provide evidence it had collected, including the names of people who were sources of information, to state elections officials who were frustrated by the group's refusal to share evidence with investigators.

    In their written response, attorneys for True the Vote said the group had no names or other documentary evidence to share.

    “Once again, True the Vote has proven itself untrustworthy and unable to provide a shred of evidence for a single one of their fairy-tale allegations," Raffensperger spokesman Mike Hassinger said Wednesday. "Like all the lies about Georgia’s 2020 election, their fabricated claims of ballot harvesting have been repeatedly debunked.”


    True the Vote’s assertions were relied upon heavily for “2000 Mules,” a widely debunked film by conservative pundit and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza. A State Election Board investigation found that surveillance camera footage that the film claimed showed ballot stuffing actually showed people submitting ballots for themselves and family members who lived with them, which is allowed under Georgia law.

    The election board subpoenaed True the Vote to provide evidence that would assist it in investigating the group's ballot trafficking allegations.

    True the Vote's complaint said its investigators "spoke with several individuals regarding personal knowledge, methods, and organizations involved in ballot trafficking in Georgia.” It said one person, referred to in the complaint only as John Doe, “admitted to personally participating and provided specific information about the ballot trafficking process.”

    Frustrated by the group's refusal to share evidence, Georgia officials took it to court last year. A judge ordered True the Vote to turn over names and contact information for anyone who had provided information, as well as any recordings, transcripts, witness statements or other documents supporting its allegations.

    The group came up empty-handed despite having “made every additional reasonable effort to locate responsive items,” its attorneys David Oles and Michael Wynne wrote in a Dec. 11 legal filing first reported Wednesday by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.


    True the Vote's founder and president, Catherine Engelbrecht, didn't immediately respond to an Associated Press email seeking comment Wednesday. She and another member of the group were briefly jailed in 2022 for contempt for not complying with a court order to provide information in a defamation lawsuit. The suit accused True the Vote of falsely claiming that an election software provider stored the personal information of U.S. election workers on an unsecured server in China.

    Prior to the State Election Board's investigation, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation looked into True the Vote's assertion that it was able to use surveillance video and geospatial mobile device information to support its allegations. In a September 2021 letter, Vic Reynolds, who was then the GBI's director, said the evidence produced did not amount to proof of ballot harvesting.

    State elections officials opened their own investigation after receiving True the Vote's complaint two months later. When pressed to provide names of sources and other documentation, the group last year tried to withdraw its complaint. One of its attorneys wrote that a complete response would require True the Vote to identify people to whom it had promised confidentiality.

    The State Election Board refused to shelve the complaint and went to court to force True the Vote to turn over information.

    In addition to names, the judge ordered True the Vote to provide copies of any confidentiality agreements it had with sources.

    The group's attorneys replied: “TTV has no such documents in its possession, custody, or control.”
    ____________


    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    It’s the anatomy of a legal coup, but also something else: an attempt to twist the law in order to instigate a constitutional crisis.
    _________

    More traitors who laughingly want to create a constitutional crisis while at the same time paying lip service to the Constitution.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    The Legal Coup
    New Documents Reveal How Trump Lawyers Sought ‘Chaos’ to Force SCOTUS, or Whoever Else, to Anoint Trump

    In late 2020, a group of conservative movement attorneys set out to build a legal framework by which Donald Trump could stay in power.


    We’ve known about the outcome of their work for three years now: how it led to the violence of Jan. 6, and fed the dream of Trump’s supporters that he might continue to serve after Jan. 20, 2021.

    But TPM can now reveal the ways in which their theorizing, in early stages, went even further than previously known, imagining a Jan. 6 that lasted for not hours but days, an intervention by Supreme Court justices that they presumed to be loyal to President Trump, and a vice president who upended his constitutional duties, allowing the U.S. to descend into chaos.

    A trove of documents obtained by TPM details many of the conversations among Trump campaign lawyers, and, in particular, the theories offered by Kenneth Chesebro, an attorney who worked with the campaign in the months leading up to Jan. 6.

    Within weeks of Trump denouncing the election itself and claiming that he had won, Chesebro and Trump campaign attorneys around him began to explore more exotic legal theories in which endless chaos in Congress would prove that the legislature could not certify a winner. That stalemate, they theorized, would force the Supreme Court to act.

    Chesebro, an appellate lawyer, provided a legal framework in which, he contended, Trump could still win — or at least cause enough confusion and chaos that the conservative Supreme Court would have to get involved in picking the president. His plan envisioned several gambits which have now become familiar building blocks of the legal portion of the coup attempt, and the basis for criminal charges across the country: creating slates of fake electors, having Mike Pence refuse to count Biden’s electoral votes on Jan. 6, and ultimately tossing the whole issue to the high court.

    TPM obtained the trove of documents after Ken Chesebro supplied emails, texts, and memos from his time with the Trump campaign to Michigan prosecutors in Attorney General Dana Nessel (D)’s office, which has been investigating the fake electors scheme. Multiple defense attorneys for already-charged fake electors told TPM that they had received the documents as part of the discovery process in that case. After Michigan prosecutors sent out the documents, CNN and the Detroit News reported on his Oval Office encounter with Trump and the fake electors scheme using records from the same trove obtained by TPM.

    The thousands of emails, memos, and texts only represent what Chesebro experienced directly and what he chose to share. Other emails and texts among Trump lawyers from which Chesebro was excluded are not included here. The records are not comprehensive of the Trump campaign’s entire effort to reverse the President’s loss; they reflect what Chesebro provided as he sought to avoid further prosecution, and what reached TPM.

    Specifically, some of the documents not in the trove obtained by TPM include a portion of Chesebro’s communications with another Trump attorney. Chesebro also sat for a 4 and a half hour long interview with Michigan prosecutors in December 2023 as part of his cooperation and recounted his actions from three years before. He told prosecutors in the interview that many of his communications with Boris Epshteyn, the Trump surrogate and attorney who reportedly appears in Jack Smith’s D.C. Jan. 6 indictment as co-conspirator 6, took place via Signal. Those were deleted automatically, he said.

    Overall, the trove of documents details how Chesebro gave the Trump campaign what it desperately wanted: procedurally and substantively radical ideas which would allow the President to exert maximum leverage on any body or person in the country that might conceivably have the power to keep him in office. TPM provided Chesebro’s attorneys with a list of questions; in an interview, they offered broad responses characterizing their client as someone who loved to theorize, and who was convenient for a Trump campaign which had already decided that it was going to try to keep the election unresolved as long as possible. “He’s the only one that could validate what he was saying through facts and law, versus talking about space lasers and Hugo Chavez,” Chesebro attorney Manny Arora told TPM.

    The trove includes encounters that, in typically Trumpian fashion, range from the showy to the menacing to the bizarre. At one point, Chesebro infuriates former chief of staff Reince Preibus by telling Trump in December 2020 that he still has a chance at winning on Jan. 6; at another, John Eastman speculates that Chief Justice John Roberts might be on their side if not for fear of how “to account for the riots angle” should the Supreme Court declare Trump the winner. Chesebro at one point referred to Pence declining to open electoral votes from Georgia as a “fairly boss move;” at another, he forgets that Biden, and not Pence, was Vice President in 2016 while asking a Pence attorney about his plans for Jan. 6, 2021.

    The trove provides a definitive account of how a small group of attorneys, dedicated to Trump, designed and tried to implement the portion of the coup attempt which unfolded via legal arguments. They burnished the former president’s efforts with a veneer of respectability that at times masked their radicalism: This portion of the effort to reverse Trump’s loss did not proceed via loud claims of voter fraud or through Sidney Powell’s promise of a “Kraken” lawsuit that would wipe her enemies away, nor did it move forward through the actions of mobs and street thugs primed to seize the Capitol on Jan. 6.

    Rather, the attorneys involved all had extensive experience in the practice of law. Chesebro is a Harvard Law graduate who spent much of his early career working on appellate cases with liberal commentator and Harvard Law professor Larry Tribe. John Eastman was a longtime conservative movement attorney who had been dean of Chapman University Law School. Others, like Pennsylvania attorney Bruce Marks, had built careers out of an extensive civil practice.

    TPM is beginning this series with an exclusive story examining the plan to extend Jan. 6 for weeks — until Congress, the Supreme Court, or, in Eastman’s view, state legislatures filled the void by declaring Trump the winner. It’s shockingly congruent when matched up with the reality of what ultimately took place through violence, not legal maneuvering: as Vice President Mike Pence refused to go along with one version of the plan, an angry mob forced a partial delay by storming the Capitol.

    Overall, what the Trump attorneys developed was an elaborate fantasy of epic proportions. Chesebro emerges as an attorney willing to push the bounds of the law, but who is unmoored from a basic sense of proportion. He seems, in the documents TPM obtained, to lack an understanding of the import of his proposals, and also of some professional faux pas: many long memos examining various theoretical scenarios appear to go unanswered, before Chesebro follows up with more lengthy memos further elaborating on his theories.

    During the interview with prosecutors, Chesebro cast himself as the latest in a long line of attorneys to be victimized by Trump and those around him. He blamed the campaign for throwing him under the bus in the years after the Capitol insurrection, suggesting that the campaign ordered him to stay quiet, while also casting him to the Jan. 6 Committee as a rogue attorney, all while refusing to pay his legal bills.

    “It’s been a real lesson in not working with people that you don’t know and are not sure you can trust. It really went south for me,” Chesebro told prosecutors. “I had a wonderful apartment in NYC that I had to sell for a $2 million dollar loss, and lost almost all my net worth because of the attorney bill.”

    While much of Trump’s effort to reverse his loss unfolded in full public view, with Trump publicly announcing his plans and threatening Pence and others to cooperate, the Chesebro documents offer a look at the portion of the coup attempt which proceeded behind closed doors: how elements of the legal strategy were devised, including both the longshot bids to throw an elephant-sized wrench in the gears of Congress and more mundane but telling examples of how the Trump campaign chose which lawsuits to bring before the Supreme Court. That includes calculations from Eastman about how many states needed to have their results contested in order for the Supreme Court to be able to overcome Trump’s electoral vote gap.

    In late 2022, TPM brought you The Meadows Texts: a definitive, comprehensive look at how the White House chief of staff coordinated the scheme to subvert the 2020 election. Now, with the Chesebro documents, we have a view into how one of the main legal architects of the coup advocated for his ideas — which were far more successful than anyone could have predicted, and included discussions of unrealized, theoretical possibilities that were far more radical than we knew.

    It’s the anatomy of a legal coup, but also something else: an attempt to twist the law in order to instigate a constitutional crisis.
    _________

    Leave a comment:


  • statquo
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    A lengthy read, but well worth it.
    A lot of that was painful to read

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    The ‘Nuclear’ Election Conspiracy Doc Trump Cited In Court Is A Sign Of Things To Come


    The true believers were buzzing.

    It was Jan. 2 and former President Trump had just used his “Truth Social” platform to release a 32-page “Summary of Election Fraud in the 2020 Presidential Election in the Swing States.” The document rehashed thoroughly debunked claims, promoted blatantly false information, and repeatedly cited other reports that do not actually appear to exist to make the patently absurd assertion there is “no evidence Joe Biden won.” In other words, it was everything many hardcore Trump supporters who refuse to accept his defeat had been waiting for.

    On the site formerly known as Twitter where election dead-enders have taken advantage of Elon Musk’s permissive attitude towards right-wing conspiracy theories, a few thousand pro-Trump activists spent nearly 13 hours in an audio chat discussing the document, which they dubbed “The Nucleus File.” But the report was more than an object of fascination for the pro-Trump fringe.

    Along with becoming a hot topic in delirious Twitter Spaces, the report was cited in a Jan. 2 federal court filing by Trump’s attorneys, part of a wild strategy to argue he was immune from prosecution in the election interference case brought by special counsel Jack Smith.

    The use of a questionable anonymous document to incorporate election conspiracies into his defense raised eyebrows from legal observers, even those who had grown familiar with the former president’s everything-at-the-wall approach to his defense. One lawyer who previously worked for Trump described the move to TPM as not just unlikely to help his case, but akin to bringing up an “alien abduction” before a judge.

    “That’ll never get off the ground,” said the lawyer, Ty Cobb, a veteran defense attorney who was special counsel on Trump’s White House legal team during the Mueller investigation and who has since become an outspoken Trump critic.

    The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against Trump’s team on Tuesday and allowed the prosecution to move forward at the district court level. In their decision, the circuit court panel stuck to the question at hand and completely ignored the assertion from Trump’s legal team that the 2020 outcome was up for debate. Instead, the court flatly declared Trump both an election loser and a danger to the democracy.

    “Former President Trump’s alleged efforts to remain in power despite losing the 2020 election were, if proven, an unprecedented assault on the structure of our government,” the judges wrote.

    The document may not have had any impact in court, but there are many indications it is part of a larger — and ongoing — project for Trump’s presidential campaign that his activist allies describe as a “nuclear” assault. The promotion of the document by the former president and its use in his legal defense ultimately served as proof that Trump is making the fever dream that he won the last election a part of the current one. Trump is dragging all elements of his political universe with him down the conspiracy theory rabbit hole, including his campaign team, an army of attorneys, Republican Party leaders, and the activists who have driven the false narrative online and are increasingly targeting election infrastructure in the real world.


    Former President Donald Trump — flanked by attorney John Lauro, left, and D. John Sauer, right — speaks to reporters and members of the media at the Waldorf Astoria hotel after attending a hearing of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals at the federal courthouse on Tuesday, Jan. 09, 2024, in Washington, DC.

    Early on in the marathon Twitter discussion about the file, a right-wing streamer who has amassed a six-figure following using the handle “Behizy” took the virtual stage.

    “What’s up my fellow conspiracy theorist election deniers?” Behizy declared, with evident sarcasm oozing over any potential hint of self awareness.

    “I saw the report,” he said. “Who wrote it? Does anyone know?”

    “We’re trying to figure that out,” replied Pablo Martinez, the chairman of the Republican Party in McKinley County, New Mexico, who was one of the hosts of the conversation.

    “Behizy” actually seemed pleased not to get an answer to his question.

    “I like that the author is anonymous because we know the mainstream media will attack the messenger before actually addressing the message,” he said. “So, I think it’s just smart that they intentionally omitted their name from the report.”

    The report, however, wasn’t entirely anonymous. One person whose name was all over the document — David Cross — spoke to the crowd a few minutes later. Cross, who is a financial adviser in Georgia, has emerged in recent years as one of several self-styled experts and sleuths who have taken it upon themselves to question the 2020 presidential election results and the integrity of the country’s election systems. Corporate records show Cross is one of three executives at an outfit called the Election Oversight Group, a supposed watchdog organization, along with a man named Kevin Moncla. The EOG has helped file complaints with elections officials in Georgia and created research documents and videos based on debunked allegations. Cross, Moncla, and their organization were cited seven different times in the document shared by Trump and, on the Twitter broadcast, Cross hinted it was just the beginning.

    “One of the things that everybody needs to realize about this report is that this is a summary. There’s a bigger report that’s going to be coming later and it’s going to be like dropping a nuclear bomb on all of these states and with all of the ways that elections are manipulated,” Cross declared. “So, that’ll be the next thing that’s coming. So, you’re kind of getting a taste of the big picture in looking at this report. There’s more to come.”

    Cross, who did not elaborate on his apparent inside knowledge, then went on to encourage other activists to obtain positions working within election infrastructure. However, he cautioned them to erase their “pro-Trump” digital footprint beforehand.

    “You need to be involved as an election worker on Election Day and, if you are going to do that, then go on to your Facebook account and eliminate as much conservative stuff as you possibly can because you will be profiled,” he said. “They will not hire you.”

    “Put stuff about, like, you know, your cats, and your flower garden, or your dogs, or fishing. I don’t care, just not political stuff,” Cross said, adding, “Get your ass hired so that you can be part of this and be part of the solution.”

    The strategy was an example of how election conspiracy-theory activists are taking their message offline and into the polling places and offices where America’s votes are counted. After outlining his idea for a stealth mission, Cross returned to the report and seemed to indicate he had a hand in writing it.

    “We have to close all possible loops for cheating and malfeasance, and I think we’ve done a really good job of exposing that in the report that everybody’s reading or the summary that you’re reading,” Cross said.

    Despite seeming to take credit on the Twitter broadcast, Cross denied playing any role writing the report shared by Trump during a phone conversation with TPM on Feb. 2.

    “My involvement in that report is just that my work was cited in it, so I didn’t actually write the bullet points that are in there, because what you’re looking at is a summary,” Cross said. “But I am aware that there’s going to be more, because, like I said, you’re looking at a summary, you’re not looking at all the details.”


    Former President Donald Trump acknowledges supporters as he leaves the stage at the conclusion of a campaign rally at the SNHU Arena on January 20, 2024 in Manchester, New Hampshire.

    The Trump campaign clearly played a role in publishing the report. On Jan. 6, four days after Trump shared the “election fraud” summary and his legal team cited it in the reply brief, the Washington Post published a story about the document that claimed “Trump campaign spokesperson Liz Harrington wrote the report.” The Post cited people “familiar with the matter.” Along with reportedly being produced by a Trump staffer, the document was hosted on a URL associated with Campaign Nucleus, a platform used by the campaign. That official web address is what led the excited activists to dub the document “The Nucleus File.”

    Harrington did not respond to requests for comment on record. Cross also initially denied being in contact with anyone on Trump’s campaign team, but later admitted the pair had been in contact.

    “Liz is really private, and so, I’m not really comfortable talking about what she’s doing or anything like that,” Cross said. “I mean, I can tell you that I’ve had a couple of conversations with her, but it’s all fairly general.”

    The Post described Harrington as a “polarizing figure in Trump’s orbit” due to her interest in 2020 election denial. Overall, the reporters framed the publication of the report as evidence of “divisions” on Trump’s team, where some of the staff have tried to tamp down on the election conspiracy theories. A senior former Trump campaign official echoed that notion in a conversation with TPM where they described Harrington as a source of “craziness” and a “challenging” figure for those trying to steer Trump away from the false voter fraud narratives.

    Of course, while Harrington or other individual staffers might be interested in election conspiracy theories, at the end of the day, it is Trump himself who shared the report and his lawyers who cited it in a court filing. Still, Harrington seems to be a central figure connecting fringe election activists with the Trump campaign.

    Last August, Trump announced a grand plan to unveil a separate report on “the Presidential Election Fraud which took place in Georgia” during a press conference at his New Jersey golf club. According to the New York Times, that report was a more than 100-page document “compiled at least in part by Liz Harrington, a Trump communications aide who is often described as among the true believers in his false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.”

    Despite Trump’s announcement, the press conference never took place and that Georgia-specific document has, thus far, never seen the light of day.

    The Georgia report that Harrington supposedly worked on seems like it may have been referenced in the “Nucleus File,” which contained multiple citations referencing a “Report on Widespread Fraud in the Georgia 2020 Presidential Election” that does not appear to exist anywhere else online. In a conversation last week, Kevin Moncla, David Cross’ partner in the Election Oversight Group, told TPM he is aware of a report on Georgia that is based, in part, on the pair’s research.

    “The Georgia portion of that report I know includes some of our work,” Moncla said.

    Like Cross, Moncla was somewhat coy when asked about his ties to Harrington.

    “I’ve contributed my work,” Moncla said. “I’ll just leave it at that.”

    Georgia’s 2020 election result, which has been the focus of much of Cross’ and Moncla’s work and skepticism, has been affirmed in three separate counts overseen by officials from Trump’s own party. The factual issues and logical leaps that plague their work aren’t the only things that make the pair potentially problematic associates for a presidential campaign. Last year, Georgia election officials asked the FBI to investigate a series of aggressive emails they received from Moncla in conjunction with complaints he filed related to the administration of the vote. At least one of those complaints is still being reviewed by the State Election Board. Moncla has also had personal legal troubles. In 2004, Moncla pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor voyeurism charge related to secretly videotaping his former wife and other guests in the bathroom of their home.

    When asked about the call for an FBI investigation, Moncla said, “I’m not going to get into the status of it.” And he dismissed the voyeurism charges as an issue that came up in a “personal divorce case.”

    “My work stands for itself, I don’t care what people think of me,” Moncla said.

    Along with showing links between fringe activists and the Trump campaign, the “Nucleus File” connects the conspiratorial politics to the former president’s legal team. The filing that cited the document used it as an example of evidence that prosecutors are ignoring “the vigorous disputes and questions about the actual outcome of the 2020 Presidential election — disputes that date back to November 2020, continue to this day in our nation’s political discourse, and are based on extensive information about widespread fraud and irregularities in the 2020 election.” Trump’s attorneys, who have argued he has immunity for his conduct on Jan. 6, brought that point up to argue prosecutors had made “legally and factually incorrect” statements in the case. The lawyers who filed the brief citing the report did not respond to requests for comment.


    Attorneys for former U.S. President Donald Trump Todd Blanche (2nd R), John Lauro (R) and Gregory Singer (L) arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Court House August 28, 2023 in Washington, DC.

    Cobb, the veteran defense attorney and former federal prosecutor who once worked for Trump, theorized to TPM that the inclusion of election conspiracy theories is likely an effort directed by the former president to “relitigate that and complicate the criminal case.” Cobb predicted that strategy would be an utter failure since it is “irrelevant” to the question of whether Trump tried to obstruct an official proceeding.

    “As a criminal defendant, you’re basically allowed to say it was an alien abduction,” Cobb said.

    While Trump and his attorneys might be able to bring up election conspiracy theories in pre-trial hearings, Cobb predicted the judge would not allow them to take these issues to trial.

    “You can get away with a lot argumentatively pretrial, but that’s why this would be a pretrial exercise. … He needs to get through her to be able to raise this at trial,” Cobb said, referencing U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan, “and he won’t be able to do that.”

    Though Cobb does not expect “The Nucleus File” will make it further into Trump’s case, its inclusion in the filings so far does seem to shed light on the figures surrounding the president. On both his campaign and in his defense Trump has found people who are willing to indulge in the 2020 election fantasies promoted by the former president.

    For his part, Cobb said he would refuse to file this type of information for a client and would “withdraw” if they insisted on it.

    “There’s right and wrong, and the importance of ethics, and having a duty of candor with the court,” Cobb said, adding, “You don’t perpetrate a fraud upon the court and you try to stop shy of letting your client do it. So this is the kind of thing I would just say no to.”

    Trump’s current legal and political operations clearly have no such qualms.
    __________

    A lengthy read, but well worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    ________

    Once again, it sucks to suck.
    It's a good start. Now let's go after him for all the other bullshit and pain he has caused.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Project Veritas admits there was no evidence of election fraud at Pennsylvania post office in 2020

    ERIE, Pa. (AP) — The conservative group Project Veritas and its former leader are taking the unusual step of publicly acknowledging that claims of ballot mishandling at a Pennsylvania post office in 2020 were untrue.

    The statements from Project Veritas and founder James O'Keefe came as a lawsuit filed against them by a Pennsylvania postmaster was settled Monday.

    The group produced videos in the wake of the 2020 presidential election based on claims from a postal worker in Erie, Pennsylvania, who said he had overheard a conversation between the postmaster and a supervisor about illegally backdating mail-in presidential ballots.

    Pennsylvania is a battleground state in presidential elections and had been a key target for unfounded claims of election fraud by former President Donald Trump and his supporters after he lost the election to Democrat Joe Biden. The claims about the Erie postmaster sparked calls for an investigation from Republicans and were cited in court by the Trump campaign to support voter fraud allegations.

    The admission Monday was the latest evidence that Trump's claims of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election were baseless. The former president's allegations of massive voting fraud have been dismissed by a succession of judges and refuted by state election officials and his former attorney general, William Barr.

    The Erie postal worker, Richard Hopkins, said in a statement Monday that he was wrong and apologized to the postmaster and his family, as well as the Erie post office.

    “I only heard a fragment of the conversation and reached the conclusion that the conversation was related to nefarious behavior,” he wrote. “As I have now learned, I was wrong."

    Both Project Veritas and O'Keefe said in their statements posted on X, formerly known as Twitter, that they are not aware of any evidence or other allegation of election fraud in Erie during the 2020 election. The conservative nonprofit, which is known for its hidden camera stings aimed at embarrassing news outlets, labor organizations and Democratic politicians, removed O'Keefe last year amid reports of mistreated workers and misspent organization funds.

    Erie postmaster Robert Weisenbach sued the group, as well as O'Keefe and Hopkins, for defamation in 2021.

    Weisenbach's attorneys included the group Protect Democracy, which confirmed the settlement, as did Stephen Klein, an attorney who represented Project Veritas and O’Keefe. Both sides said the “case was resolved in a manner acceptable to all the parties.”

    An attorney for Hopkins did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

    Weisenbach, who voted for Trump, has previously said the false ballot backdating accusations destroyed his reputation and forced him to flee his home after his address was circulated online and he was confronted by a man yelling at him as he pulled into his driveway, according to court documents.

    The U.S. Postal Service also investigated Hopkins's claims, but found no evidence of backdated ballots, according to a report released in February 2021.

    Elections officials previously told The Associated Press the county had received about 140 ballots after the election and just five had an Erie postmark.
    ________

    Once again, it sucks to suck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Criminals be criming!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Trump Campaign Coordinated Michigan Fake 2020 Elector Scheme: Report



    In December 2020, Donald Trump’s team directly orchestrated the submission of fake elector certificates in Michigan in an effort to overturn the results of the election, according to internal emails reviewed by The Detroit News.

    In a Jan. 1, 2021, email to senior Trump adviser Boris Epshteyn, Kenneth Chesebro—one of the 19 co-defendants, including Trump, indicted in the Georgia election racketeering case—said the plan was to add fuel to claims that the election was rigged and eventually “void the results favoring” Joe Biden.

    On the same day, Trump co-defendant John Eastman told Epshteyn that they were trying to hold Biden under 270 electoral votes to push the decision to the House. “If the Republicans there hold true and vote with their state delegations, Trump should win a bare majority of the states,” Eastman wrote.

    The Detroit News reported that the fake elector documents were filed under different names of state GOP officials to make them appear more believable.
    __________

    And the hits just keep coming....

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    I think Jack Smith is going to have a Happy New Year!

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/12/28/polit...ots/index.html
    ButButButBut ummm....

    CNN Fake News?

    Buttery Males?

    Ray Epps?

    Deep State?

    Nancy Pelosi?

    Both Sides?

    C'mon people, throw me frickin' bone here....

    Leave a comment:

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