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The US 2020 Presidential Election & Attempts To Overturn It

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    Tucker Carlson’s Ouster Was Part of Settlement

    Variety: “On April 26, Carlson spoke by phone with one of Fox Corp.’s eight board members, who told the host that his recent benching was a condition of Fox News’ settlement with Dominion Voting Systems.”

    “The unnamed board member told Carlson that the condition does not appear in any of the settlement’s documents, and instead was a verbal agreement. If Fox didn’t comply, the settlement was off, Carlson was told. Dominion had plenty of leverage given that the $787.5 million deal to settle Dominion’s defamation suit against the network wouldn’t officially close until late-May.
    ________

    Ah karma...thou arty a pitiless bitch
    Payback's a medevac!

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Tucker Carlson’s Ouster Was Part of Settlement

    Variety: “On April 26, Carlson spoke by phone with one of Fox Corp.’s eight board members, who told the host that his recent benching was a condition of Fox News’ settlement with Dominion Voting Systems.”

    “The unnamed board member told Carlson that the condition does not appear in any of the settlement’s documents, and instead was a verbal agreement. If Fox didn’t comply, the settlement was off, Carlson was told. Dominion had plenty of leverage given that the $787.5 million deal to settle Dominion’s defamation suit against the network wouldn’t officially close until late-May.
    ________

    Ah karma...thou arty a pitiless bitch

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Voters oust Michigan clerk who doubts election results


    The Michigan State Police exit the Adams Township Hall after executing a search warrant, Oct. 29, 2021 in Hillsdale, Mich. The search warrant was part of an investigation into actions by Clerk Stephanie Scott who has been stripped of her role in future elections. Voters in one of Michigan's most conservative counties on Tuesday, May 3, 2023, ousted Scott accused of improperly handling voting equipment after casting doubt on President Joe Biden’s election victory.


    ADAMS TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Voters in one of Michigan's most conservative counties have ousted a small-town clerk accused of improperly handling voting equipment after casting doubt on President Joe Biden’s election victory.

    Stephanie Scott lost Tuesday's recall election in Hillsdale County’s Adams Township to Suzy Roberts, who got 406 votes to Scott's 214, according to unofficial results reported by the county clerk’s office.


    Roberts, a Republican who identifies as an independent, filed as non-party-affiliated in the recall election because Michigan law does not allow for challengers to file under the same political party, the Hillsdale Daily News reported previously.

    Scott had run unopposed as a first-time Republican candidate when she was chosen in the November 2020 election to handle the voting in Adams Township, a reliably Republican community where the ticket of Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence received nearly 76% of the vote that year.

    But she joined a crew of GOP elections officials around the nation who have questioned the accuracy of U.S. voting systems. Scott is among a number of elections officials around the country accused of mishandling voting equipment in their zeal to uncover fraud.

    Before Tuesday’s recall election against Scott, her challenger said that “the lying has to stop.”

    “Somehow, nationwide, we have to make lying wrong,” said Roberts, 69. “If you got caught in the lie there was a feeling of shame. It has to be wrong again.”

    A message seeking comment was left Wednesday with Roberts. Scott and her attorney did not answer questions or provide comment before Tuesday’s election, and additional messages seeking comment were left Wednesday.

    During preparations for her township’s November 2021 election, Scott said she had voting accuracy concerns and had considered paper ballots and a hand count before settling on using the same voting system.

    The state intervened after Scott allegedly refused to allow a contractor to perform preventive maintenance and failed to conduct accuracy tests, among other issues. She was stripped of her duties running township elections in October 2021.

    When the Hillsdale County clerk’s office took custody of an election tabulator and a voter-assist terminal from township offices to prepare for a public accuracy test, they discovered the tabulator’s tablet had been removed. It was later seized by Michigan State Police after Scott allegedly refused to turn it over.

    One of Scott’s supporters, Adams Township Supervisor Mark Nichols, also lost in Tuesday’s recall election. Challenger Randy G. Johnson bested Nichols by 394 to 222 votes, unofficial results show.
    _______________

    Soooo much election fraud....

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Carlson’s Text That Alarmed Fox Leaders: ‘It’s Not How White Men Fight’


    Tucker Carlson speaks in Phoenix, Dec. 17, 2022.

    A text message sent by Tucker Carlson that set off a panic at the highest levels of Fox on the eve of its billion-dollar defamation trial showed its most popular host sharing his private, inflammatory views about violence and race.

    The discovery of the message contributed to a chain of events that ultimately led to Carlson’s firing.

    In the message, sent to one of his producers in the hours after violent Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, Carlson described how he had recently watched a video of a group of men — Trump supporters, he said — violently attacking “an Antifa kid.”

    It was “three against one, at least,” he wrote.

    And then he expressed a sense of dismay that the attackers, like him, were white.

    “Jumping a guy like that is dishonorable obviously,” he wrote.

    “It’s not how white men fight,” he said. But he said he found himself for a moment wanting the group to kill the person he had described as the Antifa kid.

    For years, Carlson espoused views on his show that amplified the ideology of white nationalism. But the text message revealed more about his views on racial superiority.

    The text alarmed the Fox board, which saw the message a day before Fox was set to defend itself against Dominion Voting Systems before a jury. The board grew concerned that the message could become public at trial when Carlson was on the stand, creating a sensational and damaging moment that would raise broader questions about the company.

    The day after the discovery, the board told Fox executives it was bringing in an outside law firm to conduct an investigation into Carlson’s conduct.

    The text message added to a growing number of internal issues involving Carlson that led the company’s leadership to conclude he was more of a problem than an asset and had to go, according to several people with knowledge of the decision. In other messages he had referred to women — including a senior Fox executive — in crude and misogynistic terms. The message about the fight also played a role in the company’s decision to settle with Dominion for $787.5 million, the highest known payout in a defamation case.

    A representative for Carlson said he had no comment.

    The text is part of redacted court filings, and its contents were previously unreported. The contents of the text were disclosed in interviews with several people close to the defamation lawsuit against Fox. The people spoke on the condition of anonymity because they did not want to be identified discussing a message that is protected by a court order. In public filings, it remains hidden behind a block of black text.

    Carlson’s messages were collected as part of the defamation lawsuit filed against Fox by Dominion, which accused the network of knowingly airing falsehoods about election fraud. Many messages shared in the case, including those among Fox executives and hosts, were released publicly. But others, including the one between Carlson and one of his producers in the hours after Jan. 6, 2021, remain redacted.

    In that text, Carlson described his own emotions as he watched the video of the violent clash, which he said took place on the streets of Washington. Carlson did not describe the race of the man being attacked.

    “I found myself rooting for the mob against the man, hoping they’d hit him harder, kill him. I really wanted them to hurt the kid. I could taste it,” he wrote. “Then somewhere deep in my brain, an alarm went off: this isn’t good for me. I’m becoming something I don’t want to be.”

    After all, he wrote, “Somebody probably loves this kid, and would be crushed if he was killed.”

    “If I don’t care about those things, if I reduce people to their politics, how am I better than he is?” he wrote.

    The text message came to the attention of Fox’s board of directors and even some senior executives only last month, on the Sunday before the trial was set to begin, according to two people with knowledge of Fox’s internal deliberations. At the time, Fox’s negotiators were entering discussions about an out-of-court settlement before the swearing in of what was shaping up to be a diverse jury.

    The next day, the board told Fox’s leadership about its plan to have the law firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen and Katz investigate Carlson. That disclosure set up the possibility that there could be a continuing investigation into what was behind Carlson’s messages at the same time as a trial, and as he was serving as its top host in prime time.

    Fox has not commented about Carlson’s ouster last week beyond an initial statement announcing that they “agreed to part ways” and thanking “him for his service.” It did not respond to a request for comment on Tuesday on the contents of Carlson’s redacted message.

    It remains unclear how the text escaped more notice earlier, given that the Fox legal team was aware of it and other offensive texts written by Carlson. Fox’s lawyers had produced the text as part of the discovery process and were involved in the redactions. Carlson had even been asked about it during a deposition, according to several people who have read the unredacted transcripts of his deposition.

    It was not guaranteed that the text would have been revealed in open court. Dominion’s lawyers had still not decided whether they would introduce the text in front of the jury, according to people with knowledge of their plans. The two sides disagreed on whether Dominion lawyers could have presented such a redacted message at trial if they had decided to do so, a decision that would have ultimately fallen to the judge. The difference became moot after Fox struck an 11th-hour deal on April 18 to pay Dominion $787.5 million and avoid trial.

    How Fox’s executives and board handled the case in the months before the trial was scheduled to begin is expected to be at issue in shareholder lawsuits filed against the company in Delaware.

    Though Carlson’s show, “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” was only a small factor in the Dominion suit, his personal texts were drawing outsize scrutiny.

    The text about the fight came on top of a damaging chain of messages that had been revealed publicly before trial, and that were shocking in their own right. Writing to one of his producers after the assault on the Capitol, Carlson described the president he championed on his show as a “demonic force” and a “destroyer.”

    A recurring theme of his show during the six years that it ran in prime time on Fox News was the displacement of white Americans by people of color. Carlson often framed topics in the news as part of a larger struggle between “us” and “them,” with immigrants and other marginalized groups steadily and surely taking from whites what had long been theirs: political and cultural power in the United States.

    He attacked Black social justice activists and portrayed immigrants from Central America as a blight on the nation. He said in 2018 that immigrants make the country “dirtier.”

    In the aftermath of a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, at the hands of a gunman who cited white supremacist beliefs in his manifesto, Carlson declared on his show that white supremacy was “not a real problem,” likening it to a conspiracy theory.

    On Monday, The New York Times and other news organizations urged the judge overseeing the Dominion case to release some of the messages that were redacted.
    _________

    Always saying that quiet part out loud even while trying to assuage his conscience over the vile shit he's been spewing for years on the air to a receptive audience...

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Second Trump-hired firm found 2020 fraud claims were ‘all false’

    A second firm hired by the Trump campaign to investigate fraud in the 2020 election said all of Trump’s fraud claims were false, the firm’s founder told The Washington Post

    The Trump campaign hired Simpatico Software Systems and its founder, Ken Block, to investigate fraud claims all over the country after the 2020 election.

    “No substantive voter fraud was uncovered in my investigations looking for it, nor was I able to confirm any of the outside claims of voter fraud that I was asked to look at,” he told the Post. “Every fraud claim I was asked to investigate was false.”

    Block said he recently met with special counsel Jack Smith, the federal investigator into Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election.

    Campaign finance records show the campaign paid Block’s firm about $750,000, starting just days after the election.

    A similar firm, Berkeley Research Group, was hired by the Trump campaign to investigate fraud claims. Like Simpatico, Berkeley did not find evidence of fraud or that the election was stolen.

    A Trump spokesperson did not address claims in the Post report, but he did deride its findings.

    “This is nothing more than a targeted, politically motivated witch hunt against President Trump concocted to try and prevent the American people from returning him to the White House,” spokesperson Steven Cheung said. “Just like all the other fake hoaxes thrown at President Trump, this corrupt effort will also fail.”

    Block did not specify which claims his firm investigated or what methods he used, citing Smith’s investigation.

    He has repeatedly spoken publicly that Trump’s claims were false, recently cheering on a court order that MyPillow CEO and conservative figure Mike Lindell must pay up a $5 million promise to a man who disproved his false election conspiracies.
    ___________

    I forget, where did we land on this....? Oh right, several states violated the Constitution, and therefore Biden actually lost.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    He'll end up as the lead commentator on RT...cuts out the middleman.
    You rang?

    Top Kremlin propagandist tells Tucker Carlson he should run for president and 'You are always welcome in Russia and Moscow'



    Former Fox News host Tucker Carlson
    • Vladimir Solovyov is a notorious Russian propagandist.
    • He says Tucker Carlson should run for President of the United States.
    • Back when Carlson had a Fox News show he would often parrot Kremlin talking points.
    The US Department of State describes Vladimir Solovyov as perhaps "the most energetic Kremlin propagandist around today."

    Solovyov is also, apparently, a Tucker Carlson fan.

    On Telegram, Solovyov says that after he learned that Carlson and his long time cable network, Fox News, were parting ways, he sent him an email.

    "You have our admiration and support in any endeavor you choose for yourself next, be it running for president of the United States (which you should totally do, by the way) or making an independent media project. We'll happily offer you a job if you wish to carry on as a presenter and host!"

    Soloyvov also welcomed Carlson to visit Russia.

    RT, the Russian state television network focused on a US audience, also appeared to offer Carlson a job today.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot 2023-04-24 184457.jpg Views:	0 Size:	62.7 KB ID:	1598882


    Carlson is popular with Russian propagandists because, back when he had a show on Fox News, he would regularly use his air time to share points of view on the war in Ukraine that were eerily similar to Russian talking points.

    Last year, he said the war, which was started by Russia when it invaded a neighboring independent country, was "designed to cause regime change in Moscow" and was also "payback for the 2016 election."

    In March 2022, Mother Jones obtained a directive the Kremlin gave to state-friendly media outlets in Russia: "It is essential to use as much as possible fragments of broadcasts of the popular Fox News host Tucker Carlson."

    Now that Carlson doesn't have a show, that directive will be more difficult for the next little while. But many of Carlson's American fans are very hopeful he'll end up on OANN or Newsmax soon.
    _______

    Leave a comment:


  • DOR
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Click image for larger version

Name:	dildo buddha.jpg
Views:	142
Size:	94.4 KB
ID:	1598864
    Gooooooooooooooaaaaaaaaaaaaalllllllllllll

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    Apparently the poor bastard didn't even know it was coming
    HAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHA HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAH...

    -takes breath-

    HAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHA HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAH AHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHH AAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAH AHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHHAHA HAHHA

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    He'll end up as the lead commentator on RT...cuts out the middleman.
    Apparently the poor bastard didn't even know it was coming

    Tucker Carlson Didn’t See It Coming

    Tucker Carlson, who was apparently fired by Fox News today, had these final words on his show last Friday: “We’ll be back on Monday.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    I'm sure it was an amicable and mutual decision by all concerned.

    Only question now is, which Fox personality will the Kremlin rely on to spread their propaganda now that Tucker is out?
    He'll end up as the lead commentator on RT...cuts out the middleman.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	dildo buddha.jpg
Views:	142
Size:	94.4 KB
ID:	1598864

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Tucker Carlson out at Fox News
    I'm sure it was an amicable and mutual decision by all concerned.

    Only question now is, which Fox personality will the Kremlin rely on to spread their propaganda now that Tucker is out?

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    DOWN GOES FRAZIER!!
    DOWN GOES FRAZIER!!!!
    DOWN GOES FRAZIER!!!!!!

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/04/24/media...ews/index.html


    Tucker Carlson out at Fox News

    By Oliver Darcy and Marshall Cohen, CNN

    Updated 12:02 PM EDT, Mon April 24, 2023



    Tucker Carlson speaks during 2022 FOX Nation Patriot Awards at Hard Rock Live at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood on November 17, 2022 in Hollywood, Florida.



    Jason Koerner/Getty Images/FILE
    CNN —
    Fox News and Tucker Carlson, the right-wing extremist who hosted the network’s highly rated 8pm hour, have severed ties, the network said in a stunning announcement Monday.
    The announcement came one week after Fox News settled a monster defamation lawsuit with Dominion Voting Systems for $787.5 million over the network’s dissemination of election lies.
    Fox News said that Carlson’s last show was Friday, April 21.
    Tucker Carlson was a key figure in Dominion Voting Systems’ mammoth defamation lawsuit against Fox News, which the parties settled last week on the brink of trial for a historic $787 million.
    In some ways, Carlson played an outsized role in the litigation: Only one of the 20 allegedly defamatory Fox broadcasts mentioned in the lawsuit came from Carlson’s top-rated show. But, as CNN exclusively reported, he was set to be one of Dominion’s first witnesses to testify at trial. And his private text messages, which became public as part of the suit, reverberated nationwide.
    Dominion got its hands on Carlson’s group chat with fellow Fox primetime stars Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham, and a trove of other messages from around the 2020 presidential election.
    These communications revealed that Carlson told confidants that he “passionately” hated former President Donald Trump and that Trump’s tenure in the White House was a “disaster.” He also used misogynistic terms to criticize pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell and reject her conspiracies about the 2020 election – even as those wild theories got airtime on Fox News.
    The lawsuit exposed how Carlson privately held a wholly different view than his on-air persona.
    Carlson did not immediately respond to a CNN request for comment.
    This is a developing story…

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Somewhere a defense lawyer is slowly banging his head against a book case of law books...

    https://www.cnn.com/2023/04/20/polit...ion/index.html


    My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell ordered to follow through with $5 million payment to expert who debunked his false election data


    By Sara Murray, CNN

    Updated 10:10 AM EDT, Thu April 20, 2023

    Washington CNN —

    My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell has been ordered to shell out $5 million to an expert who debunked his data related to the 2020 election, according to a decision by the arbitration panel obtained by CNN.

    Lindell, a purveyor of election conspiracies, vowed to award the multimillion-dollar sum to any cyber security expert who could disprove his data. An arbitration panel awarded Robert Zeidman, who has decades in software development experience, a $5 million payout on Wednesday after he sued Lindell over the sum.
    CNN has obtained arbitration documents and video depositions, including a deposition of Lindell, related to the dispute.

    “Based on the foregoing analysis, Mr. Zeidman performed under the contract,” the arbitration panel wrote in its decision. “He proved the data Lindell LLC provided, and represented reflected information from the November 2020 election, unequivocally did not reflect November 2020 election data. Failure to pay Mr. Zeidman the $5 million prized was a breach of the contract, entitling him to recover.”
    The decision marks yet another blow to the MyPillow CEO’s credibility after he publicly touted unproven claims of widespread fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Lindell has also faced defamation suits related to his election claims.
    “The lawsuit and verdict mark another important moment in the ongoing proof that the 2020 election was legal and valid, and the role of cybersecurity in ensuring that integrity,” said Brian Glasser, founder of Bailey & Glasser, LLP, who represented Zeidman. “Lindell’s claim to have 2020 election data has been definitively disproved.”
    In a brief phone interview with CNN, Lindell said “this will end up in court” and slammed the media and professed the need to get rid of electronic voting machines.
    Lindell convened a so-called “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 2021, designed to showcase the data he claimed to have obtained related to the 2020 election. He invited journalists, politicians and cybersecurity experts to attend.
    “The symposium was to get the big audience and have all the media there and then they – the cyber guys – saying yes this data is from the 2020 election and you better look at how they intruded into our machines, our computers, and that was the whole purpose,” Lindell said in a deposition obtained by CNN.

    He also announced a “Prove Mike Wrong Challenge” – in which anyone who could prove his data was unrelated to the 2020 election could win the multimillion payout – to get more traction in the media for his election fraud claims.

    “I thought, well what if I put up a $5 million challenge out there, then it would get news, which it did,” Lindell said in the deposition. “So, then you got some attention.”

    Zeidman signed up for the challenge, agreed to its contractual terms and discovered Lindell’s data to be largely nonsensical.

    While Lindell has made a variety of outlandish and unproven claims about the 2020 election, such as insisting foreign governments infiltrated voting machines, the arbitration panel made clear its judgment was solely focused on whether the data Lindell provided to experts was related to the 2020 election.

    “The Contest did not require participants to disprove election interference. Thus, the contestants’ task was to prove the data presented to them was not valid data from the November 2020 election,” the arbitration panel wrote.

    “The Panel was not asked to decide whether China interfered in the 2020 election. Nor was the Panel asked to decide whether Lindell LLC possessed data that proved such interference, or even whether Lindell LLC had election data in its possession,” according to the arbitration panel. “The focus of the decision is on the 11 files provided to Mr. Zeidman in the context of the Contest rules.”

    The panel’s decision ticked through each of the data files provided Zeidman, determining repeatedly that the data was unrelated to the 2020 election.

    It’s unclear when or if Zeidman will ever be able to collect his payout. Lindell recently told right-wing podcaster and former Trump administration official Steve Bannon that his company took out nearly $10 million in loans as he battles defamation suits related to his false election claims.

    During his deposition, Lindell said he was never concerned someone might actually win the challenge.

    “No, because they have to show it wasn’t from 2020 and it was,” Lindell said, chuckling.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Monash View Post

    I'm not across the details of the case but if Fox made similar claims about Smartmatic's voting machines to the ones they made about Dominion's (and I'm pretty sure they did) then Fox is almost certain to settle - and sign another large cheque in the process. Hopefully along with another admission that the made in their reports were false.
    As if on cue....

    Fox News' settlement with Dominion doesn't mean the risk of embarrassment is over, with Smartmatic saying it 'remains committed' to its own defamation case against the network
    • Smartmatic "remains committed" to holding Fox News responsible for alleged defamation.
    • The company made the statement following Fox News' $787 million settlement with Dominion on Tuesday.
    • Smartmatic sued Fox News for defamation in 2021 and is seeking $2.7 billion in damages.
    Fox News may have avoided — for now — the messy drama of its prime-time personalities being questioned over their false claims about voter fraud and the 2020 election. But another company suing it for defamation said Tuesday that it "remains committed" to holding the media outlet accountable for what it says are the harms it has caused to democracy around the globe.

    By settling with Dominion Voting Systems on the first day of a planned trial in Delaware, Fox News — for the sum of $787.5 million — avoided the possibility that hosts such as Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity would have to take the stand and answer questions about whether they truly believed the opinions they espoused on television. The judge in the case had already ruled that Fox News had aired demonstrably false claims about Dominion, which originally sought $1.6 billion in damages. (In a statement, Fox News acknowledged the false statements and said the settlement reflected its "commitment to the highest journalistic standards.")

    Despite ending in a settlement, the Dominion case seriously damaged Fox News' reputation and embarrassed the likes of Carlson, for example, who it was revealed had tried to have a reporter at the network fired for accurately reporting that the 2020 election was not stolen. In internal deliberations, producers and executives admitted that the vote wasn't rigged but expressed concern that they would lose their audience to far-right competitors if they did not promote former President Donald Trump's false claims.

    The risk of further embarrassment has not been completely avoided, however.

    In February 2021, Smartmatic, which sells electronic voting technology, also sued Fox News and those who appeared on the network — including Trump attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell — for defamation, claiming the network had "damaged democracy worldwide" by airing false reports suggesting the company had "fixed and rigged the 2020 election."

    Smartmatic was the subject of conspiracy theories, many hinging on its connection to Venezuela, with Powell claiming it had helped rig elections there. In fact, Smartmatic blew the whistle on fraud in Venezuela, revealing in 2017 that President Nicolas Maduro had "manipulated" the vote for a new, extra-constitutional assembly.

    In a statement on Tuesday, an attorney for Smartmatic credited Dominion's litigation with shedding light on Fox News' internal deliberations — and promised more of the same.

    "Dominion's litigation exposed some of the misconduct and damage caused by Fox's disinformation campaign," J. Erik Connolly, an attorney at Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff said in a statement. "Smartmatic will expose the rest."

    The company is seeking $2.7 billion in damages. In addition to Powell and Giuliani, its lawsuit lists Fox News anchors Maria Bartiromo and Jeanine Pirro as defendants; Lou Dobbs, a host who left the network in 2021, is also named.

    In February, a New York appeals court, in a 5-0 decision, rejected Fox News' effort to have the case dismissed and ruled that Giuliani and Pirro could remain as defendants. It also opened the door to adding Fox News' parent company, the Fox Corporation, as a defendant. No trial date has been set.


    Smartmatic's case against Powell was last year moved to a court in Washington, DC.

    "Smartmatic remains committed to clearing its name, recouping the significant damage done to the company, and holding Fox accountable for undermining democracy," Connolly said.

    A spokesperson for Fox News did not immediately return a request for comment. In February, however, a spokesperson for the company told Insider the lawsuit was a threat to free speech and a "flagrant attempt to deter our journalists from doing their jobs."

    Before settling with Dominion, Fox News' public relations team said the same thing.

    ________

    Leave a comment:

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