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Alabama Cops ATTACKED and PARALYZED Indian Grandfather by using excessive force

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  • And completely misses the point. The grandfather did no action that required or necessitated a police response. He told them he couldn't speak english and did not pose any threat or did not break any law or ordinance at that point. He tried to give the police his identification which the police greatly overreacted to and slammed him down to the ground.

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    • LiveLeak.com - Graphic Body Cam Footage Shows Dallas Police Shooting Mentally Ill Man Holding Screwdriver

      Wow. Does anyone want to defend the officers in this video? I can't find any justification. The guy had a screw driver, not a knife, not a shiv, a freaking screw driver.

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      • Originally posted by citanon View Post
        LiveLeak.com - Graphic Body Cam Footage Shows Dallas Police Shooting Mentally Ill Man Holding Screwdriver

        Wow. Does anyone want to defend the officers in this video? I can't find any justification. The guy had a screw driver, not a knife, not a shiv, a freaking screw driver.
        How sharp is a SKS bayonet?
        Chimo

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        • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
          How sharp is a SKS bayonet?
          Still a difference between:



          And:



          Maybe if the guy sharpened it. I suspect he didn't or his mother wouldn't haven't been so nonchalant walking out of the house. Plus she was getting between him and the officer he was heading towards. They had time to back up and take out the tazer if they tolerated a little more risk.

          And there's also the nonchalant attitude of the shooter, chuckling at the end of the video when he got back in his patrol car.....
          Attached Files
          Last edited by citanon; 17 Mar 15,, 07:02.

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          • i remember watching documentary "faces of death", there was an episode there (all real, filmed as it happened) 1 mentaly ill patient in nut house, got a hold of screwdriver that maintanace man left behind, he killed 1 doctor with it, striking him in the neck, dead doctor was on video laying in thy floor bleeding, than the guy was holding a nurse hostage, and held a screwdriver to her thorat, 2 cops were there pointing guns at him, but did not shoot, next second the guy put the screwdriver all the way into nure's neck, only than cops shot him. they had a chance to save her, but all they did was yell "drop the weapon". now why would you not shoot, if you know for a fact he already killed 1 guy, and is about to kill another, well at the end of the day cops failed to safe a nurse, they could have saved her, if they opened fire few seconds earlier.

            now another thing, flat screwdriver is just as lethal as knife, but it is perfectly legal to carry. and yes you can poke a person thru up to the handle easy, with barely sharpened flat head. anyone can try it and see how easy it goes thru tissue, and skin. (do not poke yourself, poke a meat, next time you buy a big piece.
            Last edited by omon; 17 Mar 15,, 17:30.
            "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!" B. Franklin

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            • Cops were kind of in a no winner at that point. If they shot, someone would have asked:
              1. Why did they shoot someone "only" armed with a screwdriver (don't let facts get in the way of emotions)
              2. Why didn't they have training for dealing with mentally disturbed people
              3. Why didn't they shoot the gun out of his hand or hit him in the leg? (Again, don't let facts get in the way of a hissy fit)

              And yes - screwdrivers go into flesh very easily...which is why I don't put them in my back pocket any more.

              Side note - also legal and not looked at as so "weaponlike" is a large set of vise grips or crescent wrench. I've always advocated my female loved ones carry this when they go to colleges (where only criminals have weapons), since they always need to adjust the thingamjig on their cars.
              "Bother", said Poo, chambering another round.

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              • Video seems to show a cop shotting a man in the back who was on the ground, that is not defensible.

                Comment


                • Federal charge for ex-cop in confrontation with Indian man

                  BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (AP) A former Alabama police officer has been charged with violating the civil rights of an Indian man who was injured during a violent confrontation, authorities said Friday.

                  Former Madison police officer Eric Sloan Parker is charged with using unreasonable force that left Sureshbhai Patel partially paralyzed. The 57-year-old grandfather was slammed face-first to the ground in the Feb. 6 confrontation, which was captured on video.

                  Parker will plead not guilty, defense attorney Robert Tuten said.

                  "We are shocked, disappointed and overwhelmed by all the ways Eric Parker is coming under attack," Tuten said in an email. "However, we are looking forward to seeing the indictment and having our day in court."

                  Police treatment of minorities has become a big issue in the United States over the past year, and U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance said people "must be able to trust the police."

                  "Law enforcement officers who violate their oath to protect and use excessive force must be brought to justice," Vance said in a statement.

                  Hank Sherrod, an attorney for Patel, said Patel and his family were "very pleased by the prompt and decisive action" of federal prosecutors.

                  Patel has made "tremendous progress" and recently took a few steps using a walker but remains in a rehab center in Huntsville, Sherrod said.

                  Patel was visiting relatives when police were called to a suburban neighborhood where he was walking.

                  Audio and video recordings released by police show Patel was slammed to the ground by an officer responding to a call about someone walking in a subdivision in the town.

                  Parker, 26, of Toney has since been fired and faces a state assault charge. Patel also has filed a civil lawsuit.

                  Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley previously apologized to the Indian government for the treatment of Patel, calling it a case of "excessive force."

                  The police chief in Madison, a suburb of Huntsville in the Tennessee Valley of north Alabama, also has apologized for what happened to Patel. Link
                  ___________________

                  Glad to know there is accountability and swift action taken on both the Federal and State level.
                  Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by citanon View Post
                    LiveLeak.com - Graphic Body Cam Footage Shows Dallas Police Shooting Mentally Ill Man Holding Screwdriver

                    Wow. Does anyone want to defend the officers in this video? I can't find any justification. The guy had a screw driver, not a knife, not a shiv, a freaking screw driver.
                    Wasn't able to see the video but I might suggest considering what that screwdriver could do if driven into your abdomen by a drug effected, angry or mentally disturbed adult male. Alternately consider how hard you could punch out with a screwdriver if seriously pissed off/frightened.

                    The general rule is - put yourself in the officers shoes, ask if you had time to issue warnings/directions, if so ask if they were obeyed. If not consider what other force options were available and whether you had time to deploy them - and remember you can usually only choose one option in the few seconds you have to deploy it. Would you have used OC spray for instance or gone to taser or baton? Finally if you are not 100% certain of your choice then how easy is it to judge the other guy? Always put yourself in the other persons shoes before you judge.

                    That aside there are heaps of examples (in the US at least due to sheer scale) where LEOs have either made a wrong decision or else were grossly negligent if not criminal in their conduct. The former is an innocent mistake, the latter should see them treated like any other offender.
                    Last edited by Monash; 30 Mar 15,, 12:07.
                    If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Monash View Post
                      The general rule is - put yourself in the officers shoes, ask if you had time to issue warnings/directions, if so ask if they were obeyed. If not consider what other force options were available and whether you had time to deploy them - and remember you can usually only choose one option in the few seconds you have to deploy it. Would you have used OC spray for instance or gone to taser or baton? Finally if you are not 100% certain of your choice then how easy is it to judge the other guy? Always put yourself in the other persons shoes before you judge.

                      That aside there are heaps of examples (in the US at least due to sheer scale) where LEOs have either made a wrong decision or else were grossly negligent if not criminal in their conduct. The former is an innocent mistake, the latter should see them treated like any other offender.
                      Why do the public have to put themselves in the officer's shoes in the first place? The LEO is there to protect the public and individuals, not himself. If he can't handle that, then he shouldn't be a LEO in the first place. The job of the LEO is to put the public's safety and individual members' safety first before himself.

                      I saw the video and that suspect, given all the rights of being presumed innocent until proven guilty, was not acting in any hostile manner even with the screwdriver. But the LEO just went ahead and shot him up and he was heard laughing afterwards. That tells me that he didn't exactly fear for his safety in the first place. So I do not agree with your post at all.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Blademaster View Post
                        Why do the public have to put themselves in the officer's shoes in the first place? The LEO is there to protect the public and individuals, not himself. If he can't handle that, then he shouldn't be a LEO in the first place. The job of the LEO is to put the public's safety and individual members' safety first before himself.

                        I saw the video and that suspect, given all the rights of being presumed innocent until proven guilty, was not acting in any hostile manner even with the screwdriver. But the LEO just went ahead and shot him up and he's was heard laughing afterwards. That tells me that he didn't exactly fear for his safety in the first place. So I do not agree with your post at all.
                        As I said I haven't seen the video so I can't comment on this particular case, although based purely on your description the officer in question may well have made a serious error of judgment (and that's putting it lightly).

                        That said. LEO's job is to uphold the law not put his life at risk in order to serve the public. They are not expected to suffer injury or death as part of their job description any more than a fireman is 'expected' to burn to death in the line of duty or a Doctor is 'expected' to risk catching a serious illness in the course of treating the sick. These things are risk factors to be mitigated against, not job descriptors.

                        A LEO has no more of a legal obligation to put themselves at risk than any private citizen - there is simply a greater probability of such harm occurring given the specific nature of the job they perform.

                        As for the rest if called to account for their actions before a jury that is how a LEO'S actions will be judged I.e. each member of the jury will asked to decide based on the evidence put before them whether the officer's actions were reasonable in the circumstances. (Would I do the same thing in the same circumstances if I was in his or her place.)
                        Last edited by Monash; 31 Mar 15,, 06:06.
                        If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                        Comment


                        • Alabama police officer on trial for throwing Indian man to ground

                          (Reuters) - The federal trial of an Alabama police officer who faces a civil rights charge after being captured on video throwing an Indian man to the ground got underway on Tuesday with the start of jury selection, prosecutors said.

                          Eric Parker, 26, is accused of using unreasonable force while serving as a police officer in Madison, Alabama during the Feb. 6 incident, which left an Indian grandfather badly injured.

                          He faces a single charge of depriving the victim of his rights.

                          Sureshbhai Patel, who spoke no English, had been on a morning walk about two weeks after moving from India to northern Alabama to help his son's family care for a young child.

                          He sustained injuries that required surgery to relieve pressure on his spinal cord, according to a civil suit that he has filed against Parker and the city.

                          The 58-year-old is expected to testify through a translator, his attorney Hank Sherrod said in an email. He said Patel is not expected to fully recover from his injuries, and now requires assistance to walk.

                          The police department released a video recorded inside a patrol vehicle. It showed Patel standing with his hands behind his back with two uniformed officers in a residential neighborhood, before he was abruptly flipped to the ground.

                          The Madison Police Department apologized for Parker's actions and recommended his termination, which he has challenged.

                          Parker's attorney, Robert Tuten, previously said the officer did not believe he had violated the law. He could not immediately be reached for comment on Tuesday.

                          Parker was charged in state court with misdemeanor assault. Both that trial and his termination proceedings are on hold pending the outcome of the federal case, a city official said. Link
                          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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                          • Indian man injured by police testifies against officer

                            HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) An Indian man left partially paralyzed when he was slammed to the ground during a police stop in Alabama testified Wednesday that he'd been in the state only about a week when he was confronted by officers investigating a call about a suspicious person.

                            Sureshbhai Patel, 58, was pushed in a wheelchair to the witness stand in U.S. District Court in Huntsville, where he testified through an interpreter against Officer Eric Parker during the opening day of testimony. Parker is accused of violating Patel's civil rights during the police stop Feb. 6 in Madison, a suburban city of about 46,500 just west of Huntsville.

                            Patel recounted how he was staying with his son on a visit from India and had been out for a morning walk in the neighborhood when police approached. He said he doesn't speak English and couldn't understand the orders police gave him.

                            Cameras in patrol cars recorded the scene as Parker swept one of his legs in front of Patel, slamming him to the ground.

                            "My two hands, my two legs they all became cold and numb," Patel said, testifying through interpreter.

                            Patel later recalled that he couldn't stand after officers tried lifting him up. Patel's family has said he still has trouble walking and that the family faces hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical bills.

                            Madison police officer Charles Spence testified Wednesday morning that Parker had Patel's hands behind his back when he arrived and that he didn't think Patel needed to be detained because he didn't appear to pose a threat or resist officers. Spence said Patel was knocked down, then handcuffed and the cuffs were taken off when it became clear that he was hurt.

                            Video, which was slowed down and enlarged for jurors, was shown in court while Spence was on the witness stand.

                            In the video, Patel can be seen turning his head toward Parker just before he was knocked down. Before and after the takedown, officers are heard several times trying unsuccessfully to communicate with Patel, who had repeatedly said "No English."

                            Parker and his attorney, Robert Tuten, have said Patel repeatedly tried jerking away from officers and reached for his pockets.

                            Patel denied those claims through his interpreter and said he stopped when officers ordered him to because he heard them shout not because he understood what they were saying. Patel also said officers "checked his pants" before he was slammed down.

                            Police were called after a neighbor reported a thin black man walking around looking at houses. Spence said he initially passed Patel and kept looking for a black man who fit the description.

                            Prosecutors dismissed the defense's argument that the use of force was justified. They noted that officers were seeking a person based on a vague description and that Patel wasn't engaged in any criminal activity.

                            "We could imagine some ghastly scenarios, right?" prosecutor Robert Posey asked after Tuten mentioned hypothetical situations a suspicious person could have been involved in. "But that doesn't mean you get to treat everybody like a home invasion killer," Posey said.


                            Police are trained to be suspicious and must always expect the worst, Tuten said during opening statements. He called Patel's injuries unfortunate and characterized the encounter as an escalation of police tactics, not a criminal offense.

                            "They say excessive force, Officer Parker says reasonable under the circumstances," Tuten said, later adding. "It's unfortunate that Mr. Patel doesn't speak English. It's also unfortunate that Mr. Parker doesn't speak Hindi."

                            Patel, a farmer from Gujarat, India, speaks Gujarati. His son, Chirag Patel, said he spent the last nine years working to bring his parents to the United States.

                            Chirag Patel said he hadn't thought of telling his father to carry identification during his usual morning walks strolling down the block and back.

                            The elder man, who is now undergoing physical rehabilitation, has since been joined by his wife and now lives in Alabama with his son.

                            Parker is being fired by the city of Madison but has appealed and the termination process is on hold until criminal charges are resolved.

                            Court documents show Madison Police Chief Larry Muncey is expected to testify for prosecutors that Parker's actions violated department procedures. He publicly apologized to Patel.

                            Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley called Patel's treatment a case of "excessive force" in an apologetic letter to the Indian government.

                            Parker also faces a state assault charge. Patel filed a federal lawsuit seeking an unspecified amount of money for his injuries. Link
                            Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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                            • Originally posted by omon View Post
                              i remember watching documentary "faces of death"
                              Faces of Death is not a documentary. Faces of Death IV - including the scene with the nurse - in particular is entirely faked.

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