Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Alabama Cops ATTACKED and PARALYZED Indian Grandfather by using excessive force

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • citanon
    replied
    The responsible officer has been charged with assault and is going to be fired. This is an example of the system working.

    The instances when it's not working are the incidents that never come to the light of day because they are not caught on video and the victim isn't such a blatantly sympathetic figure.

    IMHO every police department in the country need to make body cam use a de facto requirement in potentially confrontational situations with serious penalties for non-compliant officers.


    I'm sure the great majority of officers are dedicated, law abiding individuals who are out to protect the communities they serve. On the other hand, abuse of power is a part of the human condition. When you have as much authority as police officers do and as many opportunities to abuse that power as they face, abuses are inevitable. Public supervision and transparency is critical.

    Leave a comment:


  • YellowFever
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    2. Yellow, it is a disturbing trend throughout much of the country (Zraver will probably faint when he reads that I wrote that). However, there is little question that incidents are on the rise in the South against non-white populations. It is not something in the water but it is something which is trending.
    .
    Statistics please.

    Because everything I read from the DOJ and the NAACP suggests that North Eastern and South West police depts. are the biggest offenders.

    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    1. Madison, AL PD is not unionized.

    2. Yellow, it is a disturbing trend throughout much of the country (Zraver will probably faint when he reads that I wrote that). However, there is little question that incidents are on the rise in the South against non-white populations. It is not something in the water but it is something which is trending.

    3. Gunnut, you are not helping.

    Leave a comment:


  • gunnut
    replied
    Originally posted by Batista View Post
    Well done Alabama Cops!!! Alabama White Cops made their day checking strength on a old helpless man.

    So few days ago US President OBAMA was preaching "brown" Indians in India about being tolerant and reciting "Gandhi".

    Why is OBAMA silent now when his own house is burning deeply on racism and responsible for so many wars and strife and killings of millions around the world? The Ferguson fire was not even doused and now attack on a old "brown" man.Attacks on Sikhs and their temples is not new anymore since average American doesn't know the difference at all.

    Mr Obama should do some soul searching before preaching others about tolerance and human rights and all those big words.Seems like he is blaberring just anything without thinking.

    If Martin Luthar King was alive he might have put his head in shame to see RACISM still prevalent and his efforts gone in gutter.

    America is Great!
    If it makes you feel better, our cops beat our own people too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blademaster
    replied
    Originally posted by tuna View Post
    If it can be determined that the officer was acting according to department policies, then they cover whatever it is that the officer is accused of. Worst case is usually paid time off. If the officer is found at fault, the city pays the lawsuit.
    In other words, they are not held accountable to their actions. And you wonder why these events occur.
    This is what I was talking about in another post. Instead of focusing on police behavior in general, it is made into a race issue. This takes the focus off the real problem, and takes those who aren't of the affected race out of the equation.


    Yes - police departments have unions.
    This is why unions should be held financially responsible for any action that the police officer may make. Why should the city be forced to bear all the costs? The costs should be split between the city for failure to provide adequate supervision and ensuring that no laws or policies were broken and the union for failure to enforce that supervision and laws and policies and send a message that no one gets off the hook.

    I hope that the police officer gets sued as personally liable and that there will be a federal civil suit against him.

    Leave a comment:


  • tuna
    replied
    Originally posted by Oracle View Post
    How does the department back them when there are cameras in Police vehicles recording stuff that happens? And Police have unions? What unions? I thought only communists have unions.
    If it can be determined that the officer was acting according to department policies, then they cover whatever it is that the officer is accused of. Worst case is usually paid time off. If the officer is found at fault, the city pays the lawsuit.
    In other words, they are not held accountable to their actions. And you wonder why these events occur.
    This is what I was talking about in another post. Instead of focusing on police behavior in general, it is made into a race issue. This takes the focus off the real problem, and takes those who aren't of the affected race out of the equation.


    Yes - police departments have unions.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    Fair enough, but I do feel the police should have read the situation differently after establishing contact with Patel.
    Oh without question they should have. At the very least in fact.


    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    What I'm trying to say is even if the guy was trespassing, the employed approach of acting without understanding the scene first is what ultimately lead to this. I'm not automatically inclined to assume that this was a racist police officer(s)' downright abuse of power. (This could very well be the case here but there have been similar police excesses before)
    Again, no argument from me at all. I'm also not automatically inclined to assume racism is the case here, although it could certainly be pointed to as a possible factor.

    IMHO, I think that what Tuna said is more likely the case: A police officer "roid-raging" on a smaller person. Police usage of steroids is a bad problem here in the United States and not something that gets a great deal of mainstream attention. I'd be curious to see what would happen if they tested this guy for anabolic steroids

    Leave a comment:


  • YellowFever
    replied
    Originally posted by astralis View Post
    Please don't blame this on the "water down South".

    You're as guilty as Batista for flaming using words like that.

    As far as these two cops are concerned, they should be fired immediately and brought up on charges to the full extent of the law starting with but not limited to abuse of power.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarthSiddius
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    An incorrect eyewitness account regarding age and ethnicity is about as common as you can get. Both can difficult to determine even when up close.
    Fair enough, but I do feel the police should have read the situation differently after establishing contact with Patel.

    If by "response appropriated" you're referring to Mr. Patel being slammed to ground, then no certainly not.
    What I'm trying to say is even if the guy was trespassing, the employed approach of acting without understanding the scene first is what ultimately lead to this. I'm not automatically inclined to assume that this was a racist police officer(s)' downright abuse of power. (This could very well be the case here but there have been similar police excesses before)

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    So the guy calling in to the police got the age and ethnicity wrong, that should have thrown doubts over his credibility.
    An incorrect eyewitness account regarding age and ethnicity is about as common as you can get. Both can difficult to determine even when up close.

    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    "Just wandering around" and, allegedly, "walking close to the garage" shouldn't evoke the response appropriated.
    If by "response appropriated" you're referring to Mr. Patel being slammed to ground, then no certainly not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blademaster
    replied
    By the way, for those who criticized the police officer's beatdown of this elderly gentleman, time to put your money where your mouth is. Here is the link to contribute to paying off this man's medical bills. He has no health insurance. I have donated a significant amount of money to his fund.

    Sureshbhai Patel's Recovery Fund by Aakash Patel - GoFundMe

    Leave a comment:


  • astralis
    replied
    BM-- feel free to discuss with TH/Oracle in private, but not here.

    I don't want to close this thread over these petty arguments...but I will if I have to.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarthSiddius
    replied
    In a non-emergency call to police, a neighbor described Patel as a “skinny black guy” and said that he’d “never seen him before” in the neighborhood. Patel, he said, was “just wandering around” and “walking close to the garage.” The caller added that he was following Patel at a distance. When asked to estimate his age, the caller guessed Patel was in his 30′s.
    So the guy calling in to the police got the age and ethnicity wrong, that should have thrown doubts over his credibility. "Just wandering around" and, allegedly, "walking close to the garage" shouldn't evoke the response appropriated.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    For the record, I find this incident to be extremely disturbing and most unfortunate. From all appearances, Mr. Patel did nothing to warrant this sort of brutal attack and hopefully the Madison PD chief will follow through with his proposal to terminate the officer. Certainly being arrested for assault would warrant that action at the very least.

    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    but it does bring up the question if this was just the lone officer abusing his power or is it a police training issue?
    Probably both, and hopefully there will be training for this sort of encounter, not merely in Madison but on a national level.

    Originally posted by DarthSiddius View Post
    Someone thought he was suspicious enough to call the police just because he was looking into garages?
    If somebody was merely walking along a sidewalk and looking in the direction of an open garage, that doesn't sound terribly suspicious to me.

    On the other hand, somebody actually walking up the driveway to the garage itself, that would be trespassing and cause for calling for the police. The 911 call stated that somebody was "looking into windows". Personally I would've called the police if that was case.

    MADISON, AL (WAFF) -
    A Madison City police officer was arrested after an Indian grandfather was partially paralyzed following a use of force case on Friday.

    The Madison City Police Department held a news conference on Thursday on the incident.
    Police released the audio of the 911 call as well as the dash cam video of the incident. The dash cam video showed Sureshbhai Patel being thrown to the ground.

    The caller said a skinny black man in his 30's had been looking in windows. When police got to the scene, they found Patel, an Indian man in his late 60s.

    Officers are heard asking Patel where he lives and where he's going. It appears in the video Patel already has his hands cuffed behind his back when officer Eric Parker body slams Patel into the ground.

    Officers then tell Patel to stand up. You see him struggling and he's unable to do so. Madison City Chief of Police Larry Muncy said he and the entire department are sorry.

    Muncey said the actions of Parker "did not meet the high standards of the Madison Police Department." He then proposed termination and said the officer turned himself in to the Limestone County Sheriff's Office and was arrested for assault. It is not yet known if he is out on bond.

    "I sincerely apologize to Mr. Patel, Mr. Patel's family, and our community," said Muncey. "We strive to exceed expectations."


    Patel filed a civil rights lawsuit against the Madison Police Department following Friday's incident.

    The lawsuit accuses two officers of illegal seizure, unlawful search, excessive force, and false imprisonment. The filing said Patel was violently assaulted by one of the officers.

    According to the lawsuit, Patel took his normal walk route on Hardiman Place Lane. The lawsuit states he was wearing plain pants, a button down shirt, sweater, and knit cap.

    Madison Police say they received a call about a suspicious man looking in garages. Both parties agree the officers approached Patel and asked him to stop. The lawsuit states Patel told the officers “no English,” “Indian,” “walking.”

    Patel says one of the officers grabbed his arm, twisted it behind his back, and slammed his face into the ground.

    The lawsuit also said this caused significant damage to Patel's spine, and that he became immediately paralyzed. He has since regained arm movement and some use of his right leg.

    Patel says arrived in the U.S. days before the encounter to help his son and daughter-in-law care for their 17-month-old son.

    A GoFundMe has been set up for Patel. Click here to see it.

    Officials said the FBI is involved in the review of this case and will be checking to see if any federal violations occurred during the incident. Link

    Leave a comment:


  • Oracle
    replied
    Well, crimes would forever go on, and some racists would always be there. Shit happens, and I don't think brushing all Americans as racists is a nice thing to do. Every country has it's share of bad apples. Just a week or so ago a Japanese tourist was raped in India. If someone says all Indians are rapists, I would punch him on his face.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X