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  • use more force, it works.

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    • I'm sorry, you don't like being punished for breaking the law? Too bad.
      Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

      Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

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      • Let's see, cross the border illegally and then attack a federal agent? Hmm. What do they expect?

        Rocks can be lethal. If he went down from a rock to the head, I suspect they would have taken his weapon and finished him off.

        Comment


        • Witnesses say killed Mexican teen wasn't throwing rocks at Border Patrol agent
          1 hr 14 mins ago

          Eyewitness accounts are at odds with an official U.S. characterization of the fatal shooting of 15-year-old Sergio Adrian Hernandez by a Border Patrol officer on Monday.

          El Paso FBI spokeswoman Andrea Simmons said the Border Patrol officer shot Hernandez, who had entered the U.S. illegally, after he and a group of Mexican teens surrounded the agent and threw rocks at him. But two witnesses to the incident told the Wall Street Journal's Nicholas Casey that Hernandez was standing on the Mexican side of the border with his hands up and had not thrown rocks at the agent.

          U.S. national Bobbie McDow said she watched the group of teenagers from the middle of the Santa Fe Bridge, which spans the border and has two security checkpoints at either side. The teens, who had no weapons or backpacks, were playing a "cat and mouse game" McDow told the Journal, by trying to make it to the U.S. side and back to Mexico without being caught.

          McDow said that two Border Patrol agents saw the group and chased them—and that one of them, riding a bicycle, caught one of the suspects and pinned him down. She said that the same agent then fired shots into Mexico, where the other boys had run. McDow said one of the teens had thrown rocks at the agent, but that Hernandez hadn't.

          McDow's husband, Raul Flores, told the Journal that he'd seen Hernandez emerge from behind a pillar on the Mexican side of the border with his hands up before the agent shot him, first in the shoulder and then in the head.

          "They had no justification," Elias Jose Antonio González, a family friend of the Hernandez boy, told the Journal. "He was not a drug trafficker. He was the hope of this family."

          In the FBI's account, the teens had surrounded the agent and continued to throw rocks at him after he told them to stop and retreat—and at that point, the feds say, he used his gun.

          Border Patrol agents in El Paso have faced 29 rock-throwing attacks since October, the agency told The El Paso Times. T.J. Bonner, head of an advocacy group for Border Patrol officers, told the paper that attacks in general on agents are on the rise.

          Since the agent was standing on U.S. soil when he killed Hernandez on the Mexican side of the border, figuring out jurisdiction in the case could be tricky. The FBI and Mexican authorities are investigating the incident.

          —Liz Goodwin is a national affairs writer for Yahoo! News



          Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reser

          ================
          I saw the entire thing as well, the removed his organs first and sold them to the Zionists...
          To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

          Comment


          • Mexico anger high as US Border Patrol kills teen
            By OLIVIA TORRES and CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN, Associated Press Writers Olivia Torres And Christopher Sherman, Associated Press Writers Wed Jun 9, 6:29 am ET

            CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico – Mexicans are seething over the second death of a countryman at the hands of U.S. Border Patrol agents in two weeks, an incident near downtown El Paso that is threatening to escalate tensions over migrant issues.

            U.S. authorities said Tuesday a Border Patrol agent was defending himself and colleagues when he fatally shot the 15-year-old as officers came under a barrage of big stones while trying to detain illegal immigrants on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande.

            About 30 relatives and friends gathered late Tuesday to mourn Sergio Adrian Hernandez Huereka, whose shooting Monday evening came along the border with Texas. He died on the Mexican side of the river.

            "Damn them! Damn them!" sobbed Rosario Hernandez, sister of the dead teenager, at a wake in the family's two-room adobe house on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez.

            Preliminary reports on the incident indicated that U.S. officers on bicycle patrol "were assaulted with rocks by an unknown number of people," Border Patrol Special Operations Supervisor Ramiro Cordero said Tuesday.

            "During the assault at least one agent discharged his firearm," he said. "The agent is currently on administrative leave. A thorough, multi-agency investigation is currently ongoing."

            The shooting happened beneath a railroad bridge linking the two nations, and late Tuesday night a banner appeared on the bridge that said in English: "U.S. Border Patrol we worry about the violence in Mex and murders and now you. Viva Mexico!"

            Less than two weeks ago, Mexican migrant Anastasio Hernandez, 32, died after a Customs and Border Protection officer shocked him with a stun gun at the San Ysidro border crossing that separates San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. The San Diego medical examiner's office ruled that death a homicide.

            Mexican President Felipe Calderon said Tuesday that his government "will use all resources available to protect the rights of Mexican migrants."

            The government "reiterates its rejection to the disproportionate use of force on the part on U.S. authorities on the border with Mexico," the president added in a statement.

            On an unpaved street, gathered around Hernandez's gray metal casket, the teen's family called for justice.

            "There is a God, so why would I want vengeance if no one will return him to me. They killed my little boy and the only thing I ask is for the law" to be applied, said the boy's father, Jesus Hernandez.


            His mother was less hopeful. "May God forgive them because I know nothing will happen" to them, Maria Guadalupe Huereka said.

            Above the casket was a photo of the youth wearing his soccer uniform and his junior high school grade cards, which showed A's and B's.

            His mother said he was a good student who never got in trouble. He was the youngest of five children, played on two soccer teams and had just finished junior high school, she said.

            The case took a testy turn when U.S. and Mexican officials traded suggestions of misconduct in the incident.

            Arturo Sandoval, a spokesman for the Chihuahua state Attorney General's office, said a spent .40-caliber shell casing was found near the body — raising the question of whether the fatal shot was fired inside Mexico, although he did not explicitly make that allegation. That would violate the rules for Border Patrol agents, who are supposed to stay on the U.S. side of the border.

            A U.S. official, meanwhile, said video shows the Border Patrol agent did not enter Mexico.

            The official, who agreed to discuss the matter only if not quoted by name, said the video also shows what seem to be four Mexican law enforcement officers driving to the edge of the dry but muddy bed of the Rio Grande, walking across to the U.S. side, picking up an undetermined object and returning to Mexico near the area where the boy's body was. Like their U.S. counterparts, Mexican law officers are not authorized to cross the border without permission.

            According to the FBI, Border Patrol agents were responding to a group of suspected illegal immigrants being smuggled into the U.S. near the Paso Del Norte bridge, across from Ciudad Juarez around 6:30 p.m. Monday.

            One suspected illegal immigrant was detained on the levee on the U.S. side, the FBI said in a statement. Another Border Patrol agent arrived on the concrete bank where the now-dry, 33-foot (10-meter) wide Rio Grande is, and detained a second person. Other suspects ran back into Mexico and began throwing rocks, the FBI said.

            At least one rock came from behind the agent, who was kneeling beside a suspected illegal immigrant whom he had prone on the ground, FBI spokeswoman Andrea Simmons said.

            The agent told the rock throwers to stop and back off, but they continued. The agent fired his weapon several times, hitting one who later died, said the FBI, which is leading the investigation because it involved an assault on a federal officer. The agent was not injured, Simmons said.

            Chihuahua state officials released a statement demanding a full investigation into the death.

            The boy was shot once near the eye, Sandoval said. Authorities were still investigating the bullet's trajectory, he said.

            Sandoval said he couldn't comment on the video reported by the U.S. official because he didn't know anything about it. "I am unaware about those hypotheses," he said.

            Sandoval said Mexican investigators were questioning three teenagers who were with the victim at the time of the shooting.

            The boy's sister, Rosario, told Associated Press Television News that her brother was playing with several friends and did not plan to cross the border.

            "They say that they started firing from over there and suddenly hit him in the head," she said.

            The boy's mother said he had gone to eat with his brother, who handles luggage at a border customs office. While there, he met up with a group of friends and they decided to hang out by the river, she said.

            "That was his mistake, to have gone to the river," she said in an interview with Mexico's Milenio TV. "That's why they killed him."

            Mexico's Foreign Relations Department said its records indicate the number of Mexicans killed or wounded by U.S. immigration authorities rose from five in 2008 to 12 in 2009 to 17 so far this year, which is not half over.

            T.J. Bonner, president of the union representing Border Patrol agents, said rock throwing aimed at Border Patrol agents is common and capable of causing serious injury.

            "It is a deadly force encounter, one that justifies the use of deadly force," Bonner said.
            Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserve
            To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

            Comment


            • Yep, happened ten minutes from my house!

              Things are getting a bit crazy down here. A lot goes on that the news doesn't report...
              "The right man in the wrong place can make all the difference in the world. So wake up, Mr. Freeman. Wake up and smell the ashes." G-Man

              Comment


              • It's a tragedy no matter what. The Guard has to live with it and a child is dead. I skimmed but is anyone saying a warning shot was fired?
                Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost.”
                ~Ronald Reagan

                Comment


                • FBI: Mexicans chased away US agents after shooting
                  By CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN and OLIVIA TORRES, Associated Press Writers Christopher Sherman And Olivia Torres, Associated Press Writers 4 mins ago

                  CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico – Pointing their rifles, Mexican security forces chased away U.S. authorities investigating the shooting of a 15-year-old Mexican by a U.S. Border Patrol agent on the banks of the Rio Grande, the FBI and witnesses told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

                  The killing of the Mexican by U.S. authorities — the second in less than two weeks — has exposed the distrust between the two countries that lies just below the surface, and has enraged Mexicans who see the death of the boy on Mexican soil as an act of murder.

                  Mexico's government says the number of Mexicans injured by U.S. immigration authorities has increased this year.

                  Shortly after the boy was shot, Mexican security forces arrived at the scene and pointed their guns at the Border Patrol agents across the riverbank while bystanders screamed insults and hurled rocks and firecrackers, FBI spokeswoman Andrea Simmons said. She said the agents were forced to withdraw.

                  "It pretty quickly got very intense over on the Mexican side," she said, adding that FBI agents showed up later and resumed the investigation, even as Mexican authorities pointed guns at them from across the river.

                  Simmons said the forces were soldiers, but Mexico's Defense Secretary later released a statement saying soldiers were not present during the reported confrontation.

                  Enrique Torres, spokesman for the joint federal, state and municipal police operation in Chihuahua, said federal and local Mexican police were present but not any soldiers.

                  A relative of the dead boy who had been playing with him told the AP that the Mexicans — who he described as federal police, not soldiers — pointed their guns only when the Americans waded into the mud in an apparent attempt to cross into Mexico.

                  The Mexican authorities accused the Americans of trying to recover evidence from Mexican soil and threatened to kill them if they crossed the border, prompting both sides to draw their guns, said the 16-year-old boy who asked not to be further identified for fear of reprisal.

                  The confrontation occurred Monday night over the body of Sergio Adrian Hernandez Huereka, who died of his wounds beside the column of a railroad bridge connecting Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and El Paso, Texas.

                  Each government has made veiled accusations suggesting misconduct on the part of the other's law enforcement agents.

                  Hernandez was found 20 feet (six meters) into Mexico, and an autopsy revealed that the fatal shot was fired at a relatively close range, according to Arturo Sandoval, a spokesman for the Chihuahua state attorney general's office. Mexican authorities said a .40 caliber shell casing was found near the body, suggesting that the Border Patrol agent might have crossed into Mexico to shoot the boy.

                  That would violate the rules for Border Patrol agents, who are supposed to stay on the U.S. side — and could open the agent to a Mexican homicide prosecution.

                  A U.S. official close to the investigation told the AP that authorities have a video showing that the Border Patrol agent did not cross into Mexico. In fact, the official said, the video shows what appear to be members of Mexican law enforcement crossing onto the U.S. side, picking something up and returning to Mexico. The official was not cleared to speak about the video and spoke only on condition of anonymity.

                  Alejandro Pariente, Chihuahua state's regional deputy attorney general, said the U.S. Border Patrol has given him video which he is reviewing. He declined to describe it except to say that it has sped up the investigation.

                  The two killings have provoked anger in Mexico like no other recent controversy surrounding immigration, including Arizona's new law making it a state crime to be an illegal immigrant and President Barack Obama's decision to send the National Guard to the border.

                  Although many Mexicans were unhappy with both initiatives, popular and official reaction had been subdued, in contrast to street protests seen in previous years when the U.S. has cracked down on the border. Many Mexicans have since given up hope for a quick solution to the immigration problem, while other issues including growing drug violence have taken center stage in relations between the two countries.

                  That has started to change with the back-to-back deaths of two Mexicans at the border: the teenager killed Monday, and migrant Anastasio Hernandez, 42, who died after a Customs and Border Protection officer shocked him with a stun gun at the San Ysidro border crossing that separates San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico.

                  Anastasio Hernandez, who had lived in the U.S. since he was 14, was buried in San Diego on Wednesday.

                  Among those at the funeral was Humberto Navarrete, who said he was walking across the pedestrian bridge near Tijuana when he witnessed the confrontation and started recording it with his cell phone. In the blurry video, a man can be heard crying and yelling, "Help me! Help me please!"

                  San Diego police detective Kevin Rooney said he is trying to reach Navarrete to see the footage and interview him for his investigation into the case.

                  Mexican news media were filled with images of the 15-year-old's bloody body and his grieving relatives. One tabloid ran a large photograph on its cover, with the banner headline "Gringaderas," salty slang that roughly translates as "things Americans do."

                  Mexican President Felipe Calderon pledged to "use all resources available to protect the rights of Mexican migrants," and his foreign secretary, Patricia Espinosa, said Mexico wasn't taking the Americans' word that the Border Patrol agent had been defending himself from rock-throwers when he opened fire.

                  Chihuahua state Gov. Jose Reyes Baeza blamed the two killings on racism fueled by Arizona's law.

                  "We believe that this killing, the second in recent days in the border between the two countries, is due to xenophobia and racism, derived from the approval of Arizona's anti-immigration law," Reyes said.


                  Mexico's Foreign Relations Department said its records indicate the number of Mexicans killed or wounded by immigration authorities rose from five in 2008 to 12 in 2009 to 17 so far this year, which is not half over. However, two killings in such a short period is rare.

                  Meanwhile, the Border Patrol released statistics showing that assaults on agents along the border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, were on pace to far exceed totals in the previous four years.

                  Since October of last year, Border Patrol agents in the El Paso sector have been assaulted 33 times, compared with 39 times in the previous fiscal year. Twenty-nine of those incidents were rock-throwing, compared to 31 such incidents in all of fiscal 2009.

                  That's what happened Monday night, when suspected illegal immigrants who ran back to Mexico began throwing rocks at Border Patrol agents detaining other immigrants, Simmons said.

                  At least one rock came from behind the agent, who was kneeling beside a suspected illegal immigrant whom he was holding prone on the ground, Simmons said. The agent told the rock throwers to stop, then fired his weapon several times, hitting the boy, she said. The FBI is leading the investigation because it involves an assault on a federal officer.

                  The agent was not injured, Simmons said.

                  T.J. Bonner, president of the union representing Border Patrol agents, said rock throwing aimed at Border Patrol agents is common and capable of causing serious injury.

                  "It is a deadly force encounter, one that justifies the use of deadly force," Bonner said.

                  Mexicans ridiculed that stance.

                  "Let's say that Anastasio and Sergio Adrian attacked the border agents, one with his fists and the other with rocks," columnist Manuel Jauregui wrote in the newspaper Reforma. "Does that mean that killing them was the only valid option?"

                  ____

                  Associated Press Writer Julie Watson in San Diego contributed to this report.

                  (This version CORRECTS in graf 28 time period to 'Since October' sted last seven months)
                  Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserve
                  To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

                  Comment


                  • So the lesson learned is, "Do not play illegal border crossing games and throw rocks at border patrol agents or you could get shot at." Who else besides Mexicans does not understand this? The real question is how many people have to die near the border before Mexico realizes and recognizes that, yes there is a sovereign border there.
                    Removing a single turd from the cesspool doesn't make any difference.

                    Comment


                    • Was the force a bit excessive in this situation? Maybe, maybe not. We weren't there, and therefore we aren't qualified to make that decision. Whatever the case, as bonehead said, we have a border that should be protected. The consequences of violating our borders should be dire.
                      "The right man in the wrong place can make all the difference in the world. So wake up, Mr. Freeman. Wake up and smell the ashes." G-Man

                      Comment


                      • Mexican Teen Killed on Border Was 'Known Juvenile Smuggler,' Sources Say

                        Published June 09, 2010

                        | FOXNews.com
                        FOXNews.com - Mexican Teen Killed on Border Was 'Known Juvenile Smuggler,' Sources Say

                        The 15-year-old Mexican boy who was shot dead by a Border Patrol agent as U.S. authorities came under attack along the border Tuesday was known to authorities as a juvenile smuggler, sources close to the investigation told Fox News.

                        Sergio Adrian Hernandez Huereka was shot once near the eye as U.S. Border Patrol agents on bicycles were "assaulted with rocks" as they tried to detain illegal immigrants on the Texas side of the Rio Grande.

                        Huereka was charged with alien smuggling in 2009, according to sources who requested anonymity. Further details were not immediately available.

                        "He is a known juvenile smuggler," a source told Fox News. He was also on a "most wanted" list of juvenile smugglers compiled by U.S. authorities in the El Paso area, sources said.

                        Heureka's death marked the second time a Mexican citizen has been killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent in as many weeks, stoking tensions along the border between the nations.

                        Roughly 30 relatives and friends gathered late Tuesday to mourn the boy, who died on the Mexican side of the river.

                        "Damn them! Damn them!" the boy's sister, Rosario Hernandez, sobbed at a wake in the family's two-room adobe house on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez.

                        "There is a God, so why would I want vengeance if no one will return him to me. They killed my little boy and the only thing I ask is for the law" to be applied, said the boy's father, Jesus Hernandez.

                        His mother was less hopeful. "May God forgive them because I know nothing will happen" to them," Maria Guadalupe Huereka said.

                        Border Patrol Special Operations Supervisor Ramiro Cordero said preliminary reports indicate that U.S. officers on bicycle patrol were "assaulted with rocks" by an unknown number of people before Herueka was shot.

                        "During the assault at least one agent discharged his firearm," Cordero said. "The agent is currently on administrative leave. A thorough, multi-agency investigation is currently ongoing."

                        A U.S. official told the Associated Press that video of the incident shows the Border Patrol agent did not enter Mexico.

                        The unidentified official said the video also shows what seem to be four Mexican law enforcement officers driving to the edge of the muddy bed of the Rio Grande, walking across to the U.S. side, picking up an undetermined object and returning to Mexico near the area where the boy's body lay. Like their U.S. counterparts, Mexican law officers are not authorized to cross the border without permission.

                        A Mexican migrant, Anastasio Hernandez, 32, died less than two weeks ago after a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer shocked him with a stun gun at the San Ysidro border crossing, which separates San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. The San Diego medical examiner's office ruled that death a homicide.

                        Mexican President Felipe Calderon said Tuesday that his government "will use all resources available to protect the rights of Mexican migrants."

                        The government "reiterates its rejection to the disproportionate use of force on the part on U.S. authorities on the border with Mexico," the president added in a statement.

                        The Associated Press contributed to this report.
                        To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

                        Comment


                        • We should use whatever force that is necessary to protect American sovereignty.
                          "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

                          Comment


                          • Article 4 Section 4.

                            The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence.
                            "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by troung View Post

                              "Damn them! Damn them!" the boy's sister, Rosario Hernandez, sobbed at a wake in the family's two-room adobe house on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez.

                              "There is a God, so why would I want vengeance if no one will return him to me. They killed my little boy and the only thing I ask is for the law" to be applied, said the boy's father, Jesus Hernandez.


                              A U.S. official told the Associated Press that video of the incident shows the Border Patrol agent did not enter Mexico.

                              The unidentified official said the video also shows what seem to be four Mexican law enforcement officers driving to the edge of the muddy bed of the Rio Grande, walking across to the U.S. side, picking up an undetermined object and returning to Mexico near the area where the boy's body lay. Like their U.S. counterparts, Mexican law officers are not authorized to cross the border without permission.

                              Mexican President Felipe Calderon said Tuesday that his government "will use all resources available to protect the rights of Mexican migrants."

                              The government "reiterates its rejection to the disproportionate use of force on the part on U.S. authorities on the border with Mexico," the president added in a statement.
                              The Mexicans are rather selective on what laws they want applied. If there is a law that says we have to allow the invasion of millions of illegals I would like to see it. Mexicans seem to believe this law exist somewhere, but I have yet to see it on the books... anywhere. Nor do I see anywhere that the president of Mexico has any jurisdiction on American soil. If that ass clown President Caulderon really wants to protect his illegals and his own law enforcement, he is going to have to do the right thing and keep them in his own country, and own up to and fix his own domestic problems. Too bad he can't comprehend this simple and lawful concept.

                              July 4th is shaping up to be an interesting holiday this year.
                              Removing a single turd from the cesspool doesn't make any difference.

                              Comment


                              • I think the law they should have been most interested in is Newton's Second Law of Motion: Force equals (mass x acceleration), or F=ma.

                                Bullets mass less than rocks but travel much faster.

                                -dale

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