Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Southern Border Developments

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
    Posse Comitatus

    Posse Comitatus

    Posse Comitatus
    Is not relevant here. Posse Comitatus was passed in 1878, the US Army and the US Customs Service shared responsibility for border patrol until 1924 hence obviously the Army can patrol the border.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by ChrisF202 View Post
      Is not relevant here. Posse Comitatus was passed in 1878, the US Army and the US Customs Service shared responsibility for border patrol until 1924 hence obviously the Army can patrol the border.
      As someone that did a tour with JTF-6 on the boarder, I will tell you that for something that isn't relevant, Its all that is discussed. BTDT.

      Relevant enough that its all thats talked about by various JAG, Dept of State, Border Patrol, and whichever State you are in, lawyers when you get your inbrief. And a daily reminder.

      And if you read the Army history on their time at the boarder, it was a secondary job. "If you come across an illegal while doing something else," type thing. And most important, all they could do is give the person directions to the nearest border patrol Immigration Inspection Stations. No enforcement responsibilities or powers.

      Comment


      • Anger as Arizona lawmakers pass immigration bill
        Wed Apr 14, 2:48 pm ET


        LOS ANGELES (AFP) – Immigrant rights groups Wednesday slammed Arizona lawmakers after they approved a bill which will allow police officers to determine whether suspects are in the United States legally.

        Arizona's House of Representatives passed the bill by a margin of 35 votes to 21 during a session on Tuesday, the legislature's website showed, mirroring a similar measure passed by the border state's Senate earlier this year.

        The bill will now proceed to Arizona's Republican Governor Jan Brewer to be signed into law.

        The bill makes it a misdemeanor offense for an individual to lack proper immigration paperwork and also allows police officers to determine someone's immigration status if they believe he or she could be an illegal immigrant.

        Currently police can only ask about an individual's immigration status if they are suspected of involvement in another crime.

        However critics say the bill will transform Arizona into a "police state" and even sections of law enforcement have voiced fears it could harm relations between police and the immigrant community.

        Chris Newman, Legal Director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, which campaigns on behalf of day laborers in the United States, called on Governor Brewer to veto the bill, which he described as "odious" and "unwise."

        "Arizona is on the verge of enacting the most anti-immigrant legislation the country has seen in a generation," Newman said in a statement.

        "We are hopeful Governor Brewer will consult with her legal counsel, issue a veto, and spare Arizona the expense of defending an unconstitutional, unwise, and odious bill in federal courts.

        "Arizona has long been a laboratory for anti-immigrant experimentation, and its demagogue leaders have become folk heros for white supremacists throughout the United States, but this bill ushers in a new chapter of disgrace for the state that resisted celebrating the life of Martin Luther King."

        Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reser
        To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

        Comment


        • Chris Newman, Legal Director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, which campaigns on behalf of day laborers in the United States, called on Governor Brewer to veto the bill, which he described as "odious" and "unwise."
          I would like to submit Chris Newman for the ass hat of the year award.

          "Arizona is on the verge of enacting the most anti-immigrant legislation the country has seen in a generation," Newman said in a statement.
          Hmm. Anti-immigrant?? How about anti-ILLEGAL immigrant!!

          "We are hopeful Governor Brewer will consult with her legal counsel, issue a veto, and spare Arizona the expense of defending an unconstitutional, unwise, and odious bill in federal courts.
          I hope the Governor signs it and doesn't buckle one iota to this jerk!!

          "Arizona has long been a laboratory for experimentation, and its demagogue leaders have become folk heros for white supremacists throughout the United States, but this bill ushers in a new chapter of disgrace for the state that resisted celebrating the life of Martin Luther King."
          And this statement...What the hell??!! Do you have a link to the commie that wrote this?

          Comment


          • Wow! the Arizona lawmakers peaked in their shorts and found a pair. I sincerely hope that other states develop the wisdom and the courage to follow Arizona's lead. If the Feds are too corrupt to tackle the problem then it is good that at least some states still have the gonads to take care of business.

            I second the motion that Mr. Newman gets the ass clown of the year award. He earned it.
            Removing a single turd from the cesspool doesn't make any difference.

            Comment


            • Yeah, I know it hasn't been a year yet but.. The Arizina law will probably create an increased fear of law enforcement in the hispanic community amongst legal and illegals. This really is a concern because it will increase the power of any crime syndicates if they become the people able to "protect" in the community. It will also end up unfairly punishing legal hispanic residents because of profiling. As odious as a "where are your papers?" law is I think it would be better if it was required of everyone then if there was an issue of unjust detention it would be felt by all communities. The law doesnt say hispanic but, really it's specious to argue they won't be the target.

              If they want to really drive illegals out of the state make employing people without proof of citizenship a crime with mandatory fines and the threat of imprisonment for repeat offenders. No jobs and thr ilegals won't come. It's proven itself in the drop in numbers during the last year.

              On a moral level these are people for the most part just seeking a living. Yeah they broke the law but morally the US businesses and citizens hiring them as cheaper than home grown labor are the ones seeking to profit from the desperation and vulnerability. If there is no oppurtunity for illegals in the land of oppurtunity they won't leave the villiage.

              What would happen in Mexico if the money sent back by illegals stopped coming? In a way hasn't the porous border prevented the collapse of the country and creation of a complete narco state?
              Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost.”
              ~Ronald Reagan

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Roosveltrepub View Post
                Yeah, I know it hasn't been a year yet but.. The Arizina law will probably create an increased fear of law enforcement in the hispanic community amongst legal and illegals. This really is a concern because it will increase the power of any crime syndicates if they become the people able to "protect" in the community. It will also end up unfairly punishing legal hispanic residents because of profiling. As odious as a "where are your papers?" law is I think it would be better if it was required of everyone then if there was an issue of unjust detention it would be felt by all communities. The law doesnt say hispanic but, really it's specious to argue they won't be the target.

                If they want to really drive illegals out of the state make employing people without proof of citizenship a crime with mandatory fines and the threat of imprisonment for repeat offenders. No jobs and thr ilegals won't come. It's proven itself in the drop in numbers during the last year.

                On a moral level these are people for the most part just seeking a living. Yeah they broke the law but morally the US businesses and citizens hiring them as cheaper than home grown labor are the ones seeking to profit from the desperation and vulnerability. If there is no oppurtunity for illegals in the land of oppurtunity they won't leave the villiage.

                What would happen in Mexico if the money sent back by illegals stopped coming? In a way hasn't the porous border prevented the collapse of the country and creation of a complete narco state?
                Are we seeing a ghost?;):))
                Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

                Comment


                • Immigration agents raid AZ van shuttle businesses
                  By BOB CHRISTIE and JACQUES BILLEAUD, Associated Press Writers Bob Christie And Jacques Billeaud, Associated Press Writers 24 mins ago

                  PHOENIX – Federal agents on Thursday targeted more than 50 shuttle operators and smugglers accused of using the vans to transport thousands of illegal immigrants from spots near the Mexican border to Phoenix.

                  Investigators, who billed the bust as the largest human smuggling case in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's seven-year history, said the operators of four shuttle services in Tucson and a fifth in Phoenix created their businesses solely to help immigrant smugglers move their customers to Phoenix under a veil of legitimacy. The shuttle operators are accused of giving illegal immigrants fraudulent receipts and coaching them on what to say if the vans were pulled over by police.

                  "They are in knee-deep. They know exactly what's going on," said John Morton, assistant secretary of Homeland Security for U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement.

                  Arrests were made in Phoenix, Tucson and two other Arizona towns along the border, Nogales and Rio Rico. Investigators also made arrests in Tennessee, and Mexican authorities detained people south of the border. More than 800 agents from nine law enforcement agencies were involved, authorities said. The number of arrests hasn't yet been released.

                  In Phoenix, dozens of agents — some wearing black hoods over their faces — swarmed two shuttle business early Thursday in a strip mall in a heavily Latino neighborhood, just west of the state Capitol. They seized at least a dozen vans from shuttle companies, including new full-size vans emblazoned with the name of Sergio's Shuttle and older full-sized and minivans from other companies.

                  Sergio's Shuttle advertises van shuttle services from northern Mexico to cities in Arizona, New Mexico, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington.

                  A phone call to the business was not answered Thursday morning.

                  In Nogales, a southern Arizona border town, witnesses told the Nogales International they saw helicopters and federal agents swarming sites downtown. They converged around 8 a.m. on the Union Transportes de Nogales, which houses several shuttle companies and a money-changing house.

                  Nearby, agents surrounded a duplex with a shuttle van parked in front.

                  The Arizona Daily Star in Tucson reported that agents raided three sites in the southern Arizona city, making two arrests and seizing seven vans.

                  Morton said investigators gathered evidence that will show the shuttle operators were knew they were moving illegal immigrants, despite the claims of many in the past that they were performing a legitimate service.

                  "It's a calculated farce," Morton said of the five shuttle services.

                  Investigators say smugglers would guide immigrants from the Mexican border 65 miles north to Tucson so that they could walk around Border Patrol checkpoints. Once in Tucson, the immigrants would get into shuttle vans would take them to Phoenix via Interstate 10, a route that is patrolled by police but doesn't have checkpoints.

                  Immigration agents said the five shuttle businesses didn't perform legitimate transportation services, such as bringing customers to airports.

                  "They didn't advertise at all, because they didn't need to, they had a built-in clientele," said Matthew Allen, the chief of investigations for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Arizona.

                  Arizona has been the busiest illegal gateway into the United States for several years; 45 percent of all immigrant arrests by U.S. Customs and Border Protection are made in the state. Smugglers use Phoenix, 180 miles from the border, as a hub for moving illegal immigrants across the country.

                  The nation's fifth-biggest city has plenty of highways to move people around, growth that makes it easier for smuggling operations to blend into neighborhoods, and countless "drop houses," where immigrants are hidden and smuggling fees are collected before smugglers bring their customers into the country's interior.

                  Smugglers have long gotten crucial help from some seemingly legitimate businesses that supply them with cars, lodging, plane tickets and other services.

                  The accomplices have included landlords and rental agents who provide homes for smugglers to hide immigrants; taxi drivers near the border who bring immigrants to the closest cities; used-car dealerships that let smugglers register vehicles under false names; and travel agencies that sell blocks of plane tickets for immigrants.
                  Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights res
                  To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

                  Comment


                  • On a moral level these are people for the most part just seeking a living. Yeah they broke the law but morally the US businesses and citizens hiring them as cheaper than home grown labor are the ones seeking to profit from the desperation and vulnerability. If there is no oppurtunity for illegals in the land of oppurtunity they won't leave the villiage.
                    They are criminals who broke the law. The people who hire them should be punished but those illegals and their anchor babies need to go.

                    What would happen in Mexico if the money sent back by illegals stopped coming? In a way hasn't the porous border prevented the collapse of the country and creation of a complete narco state?
                    **** that, either we let them come here illegally, commit additional crimes or they will illegally smuggle in more drugs. We need a wall and strong enforcement to keep them/their drugs/their crime out of this country. Let Mexico fall deeper into the gutter and be the cease pool that Mexico strives to become.
                    To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by troung View Post
                      They are criminals who broke the law. The people who hire them should be punished but those illegals and their anchor babies need to go.



                      **** that, either we let them come here illegally, commit additional crimes or they will illegally smuggle in more drugs. We need a wall and strong enforcement to keep them/their drugs/their crime out of this country. Let Mexico fall deeper into the gutter and be the cease pool that Mexico strives to become.
                      I agree 100 percent. Now, where is the new strict law penalizing Employers or those hiring day laborer illegals? No jobs no one comes. As long as the demand for illegal labor isn't stemmed the flood won't and it won't matter how much money we spend shipping them back. It's really a long distance to build a wall and isn't a river much of the border? What do we do cut off access to it? If we spent that money equally between catching illegals and sending them home and punishing those hiring them the problem would be gone.

                      (off topic)For the most part they aren't here to commit crimes beyond being here. Drug related violence predates this issue and won't go away. It used to be columbians not mexicans. It's capitalism as long as there is a demand it will filled. If we eliminated all drug traffic from the south it'd be the damn Canadians :)I really don't think they want to create a cesspool of a country isn't that a bit biased? a Mexican might say if you all want to you all want to piss away your wonderful opportunities on drugs could you keep the drug money from creating a cesspool here. Simplistic answers feel good but this is a big problem on both sides of the border.
                      Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost.”
                      ~Ronald Reagan

                      Comment


                      • Trickier than it looks.

                        Originally posted by Roosveltrepub View Post
                        Yeah, I know it hasn't been a year yet but.. The Arizina law will probably create an increased fear of law enforcement in the hispanic community amongst legal and illegals. This really is a concern because it will increase the power of any crime syndicates if they become the people able to "protect" in the community. It will also end up unfairly punishing legal hispanic residents because of profiling. As odious as a "where are your papers?" law is I think it would be better if it was required of everyone then if there was an issue of unjust detention it would be felt by all communities. The law doesnt say hispanic but, really it's specious to argue they won't be the target.
                        Before starting, I'd like to ask, would any US citizen stoop to harvesting market crops for a pittance and under physically taxing conditions? Given the exposure to pesticides and other harmful chemicals, I'd say no. Personally I'm not above having to work like a slave for some extra pocket change, but in America the pressure to remain competitive is intense, so forcing many players to resort to 'underhanded' tactics.

                        The actual situation surrounding the illegal immigration-labor connection is wider than it appears in the media, in both complexity and scope.

                        If they want to really drive illegals out of the state make employing people without proof of citizenship a crime with mandatory fines and the threat of imprisonment for repeat offenders. No jobs and thr ilegals won't come. It's proven itself in the drop in numbers during the last year.
                        Which also serves to protect illegals - at least those who are considering getting a job with some Joe Blow subcontractor. I believe that one reason a lot of subcontractors often hire illegals is that, on top of having less tax documents to file, illegal workers usually fear having to go to the authorities for fear of being deported, thus leaving no choice but to put up with whatever abuses the work bosses inflict.

                        If illegal migrant workers coming into this country are indeed needy, they will endure any hardships to improve their lot in life. Ironically, their illegal status keeps them under the radar, thus preventing them from having to pay taxes. Which means they can send a nice sum to their folks back home.

                        On a moral level these are people for the most part just seeking a living. Yeah they broke the law but morally the US businesses and citizens hiring them as cheaper than home grown labor are the ones seeking to profit from the desperation and vulnerability. If there is no oppurtunity for illegals in the land of oppurtunity they won't leave the villiage.
                        Like I often hear, "We do jobs that Americans do not want to do."

                        Before the 1986 immigration amnesty, the US government had a guest worker program in place, right or wrong? I would like to know in what way the GWP failed and if this led directly to the 1986 amnesty.

                        My guess is that after NAFTA was instituted US food producers (a lot of them using the latest automated farm gear) had a field day and Mexican farmers eventually lost their jobs, prompting many of them to migrate north.

                        What would happen in Mexico if the money sent back by illegals stopped coming? In a way hasn't the porous border prevented the collapse of the country and creation of a complete narco state?
                        My personal guess is that the Mexican government and the upper classes are still stuck in the 18th century, at least socioculturally.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by troung View Post
                          We need a wall and strong enforcement to keep them/their drugs/their crime out of this country.
                          The wall is a feel good measure. Google border drug tunnels

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Roosveltrepub View Post

                            If they want to really drive illegals out of the state make employing people without proof of citizenship a crime with mandatory fines and the threat of imprisonment for repeat offenders. No jobs and thr ilegals won't come. It's proven itself in the drop in numbers during the last year.
                            No what caused the drop in illegals being hired was the slowdown in the economy.

                            There are laws against hiring illegals. With fines and prison sentences. But E-Verify doesn't work. That according to the Feds.

                            E-Verify fails to catch half of unauthorized workers, study reveals

                            You may notice that in the big illegal roundups, it was the companies that alerted the feds to the problems. Notices from the IRS concerning tax payments and SSNs/names not matching.

                            And the unions that were aiding the illegals in getting fake papers.

                            Unfortunatly, having a hispanic on a job site around here will get you a visit from the local sheriffs dept. Our sheriff wants to be the next "Sheriff Joe" and has picked illegals as one of his "Tough on crime" targets. That and the Fla Dept of labor coming by to check on insurance makes it pretty damn hard, if you wanted to work illegals under the table. Get caught, lose your license. I don't know any licensed contractor that thinks it is worth it.

                            A funny incident. During the winter the sheriffs dept rolled up on a construction site at PC Beach to "Find illegals". Around 30 people scattered when the cops rolled up with lights and sirens. All got arrested Sheriff holds a press conference on how he was being tough on the problem.

                            None of the people caught were illegal. But they either had a bit of dope on them or had warrants for things like child support or Driving w/out a lic,
                            In other words, typical construction workers.

                            On a moral level these are people for the most part just seeking a living. Yeah they broke the law but morally the US businesses and citizens hiring them as cheaper than home grown labor are the ones seeking to profit from the desperation and vulnerability. If there is no oppurtunity for illegals in the land of oppurtunity they won't leave the villiage.
                            The main problem is the "Day labor" pool. Every large town has a spot where people hang out waiting for day jobs. Be it the moving company needing a truck unloaded or Joe from down the street that wants his yard cut and the pool cleaned.

                            Florida has started a program concerning unlicensed contractors. It is a Felony to hire an unlicensed handyman/contractor to work on your house. They will charge the illegal contractor AND the homeowner.

                            It is the homeowners responsibility to verify that the person he/she contracts has a license and is insured. It is also illegal for the homeowner to pull a permit for someone else to work on the home. Sure sign of a shady contractor.

                            I think its California that says you don't have to pay unlicensed contractors for work done.

                            Let Joe Public know that he will go to jail if the guy he hired to cut the lawn is illegal and its not such a good deal any more. Same with the furniture movers. Not worth it. I'll let them unpack my things all day long. Then when all the heavy stuff is in the house, I would have no problem calling the cops. After a few of those, money out of the pocket of the moving companies, and they will quit.
                            Last edited by Gun Grape; 19 Apr 10,, 04:23.

                            Comment


                            • Border Patrol agent kills 15-year-old boy in Texas after rocks were thrown

                              Don't bring rocks to gun fights you start with law enforcement while breaking our laws.

                              Border Patrol agent kills 15-year-old boy in Texas after rocks were thrown
                              Tue Jun 8, 8:01 pm ET


                              A Border Patrol agent shot and killed a 15-year-old boy near El Paso, Texas, yesterday after rocks were thrown at him. Mexican officials are protesting the incident, claiming that it represents a new trend of excessive use of force by U.S. immigration officals.

                              Local FBI spokeswoman Andrea Simmons told El Paso Times reporter Maggie Ybarra that Border Patrol officers detained two people among a group suspected of entering the U.S. illegally Monday night. The officer told the rest of the people in the group to stop and retreat. Simmons said that instead of following directions, the others in the group surrounded the agent and threw rocks at him, which is when he fired his weapon.

                              Josι Reyes Baeza, the governor of Chihuahua, the Mexican state over the border from El Paso, told a local newspaper that the boy died because of "xenophobic and racist conduct" associated with popular support in the United States for the Arizona immigration law — even though the incident occurred on the Texas-Mexico border. Mexico's foreign ministry is calling for an investigation and said in a statement that "a use of firearms to repel an attack of stones represents a disproportionate use of force, particularly from authorities who have received specialized training."

                              T.J. Bonner, who heads a union representing Border Patrol agents, told the Associated Press that it's appropriate to answer rocks with bullets. "It is a deadly force encounter," he said. "One that justifies the use of deadly force."

                              Two weeks ago, an illegal immigrant died after a customs official used a taser against him while deporting him. Officials said the man had forced the agent to the ground before he used the taser.

                              According to Mexico's foreign ministry, the number of Mexicans hurt or killed by U.S. immigration authorities has risen from five in 2008 to 17 so far this year. A call to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to check those numbers has not yet been returned.

                              — Liz Goodwin is a national affairs reporter for Yahoo! News.

                              Copyright © 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reser
                              To sit down with these men and deal with them as the representatives of an enlightened and civilized people is to deride ones own dignity and to invite the disaster of their treachery - General Matthew Ridgway

                              Comment


                              • And the mayor of Ciudad Juarez lives in El Paso because he fears for his life.
                                "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X