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NY Civil Lawsuit & Criminal Trial Against Donald Trump & Family

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  • Inside Trump’s Demands for a High-Profile Surrender: ‘It’s Kind of a Jesus Christ Thing’

    He passed on an offered low-profile arraignment, instead hoping to paint a public picture of persecution — and send a message to his supporters.

    Donald Trump Insisted on turning his Tuesday arraignment into a spectacle, and he’s going to get his wish.

    A law enforcement official tells Rolling Stone that the former president was offered a chance to surrender quietly and be arraigned over Zoom. Instead, Trump opted for a midday, high-profile booking at the Manhattan courthouse, the official says.

    “He wanted a perp walk, he wanted daylight hours,” says the law enforcement official, who’s involved in aspects of the security planning. “He wants to get out of the vehicle and walk up the stairs. This is a nightmare for Secret Service, but they can only strongly suggest — not order — that Trump enter through the secure tunnels,” the official says. “Trump wants to greet the crowd. This should be a surprise to no one — especially not his detail.”

    Secret Service had argued in favor of holding the proceedings outside of court business hours, at night with minimal cameras and less risk. But Trump, a source close to his legal team says, wants to create the type of scene that he believes will galvanize his supporters.

    “It’s kind of a Jesus Christ thing. He is saying ‘I’m absorbing all this pain from all around from everywhere so you don’t have to,’ ” says the source. Describing the message Trump hopes to send his supporters, the source says: “ ‘If they can do this to me they can do this to you,’ and that’s a powerful message.”

    Trump’s decision to appear in person comes after weeks of negotiations between his team and the DA, with input from Secret Service, NYPD, and other agencies. (A Secret Service spokesman confirmed it has “been meeting with NYPD and state court officers for the last couple of weeks regarding safety and security concerns for the courthouse, areas around the courthouse, and the appearance of the former president.”) The end product is a day in court that will have some characteristics of a regular arraignment with an overlayer of the type of security a former president gets at all times.

    Trump’s arraignment is scheduled for 2:30, but the law enforcement official said Trump is now expected to arrive at the courthouse around 11:30 a.m. When it is time for him to appear, other people whose bookings are being processed will be temporarily detained. The floor above and below the courtrooms will be secured. He is expected to plead not guilty, his lawyers have said. Trump’s legal team is pushing for cameras to be kept out of the courtroom, with one lawyer warning it would create a would “create a circus-like atmosphere,” ABC News reports.

    Trump will be fingerprinted and processed, and will have his mug shot taken in the booking office, a small office in the courthouse. He will not be handcuffed, according to the law enforcement official. “Secret Service said absolutely not, no cuffs, no way.”

    Outside, there will be counter-snipers on rooftops. NYPD will be outside, with riot gear, bracing for protests to turn violent. Secret Service will have about 40 agents posted around the courthouse. Trump’s personal detail, known as “the shift” will be inches away from him at all times.

    “It will be a shitshow,” says the law enforcement official.

    The Manhattan DA did not return requests for comment.

    The source says that Trump’s mugshot will be anything but ordinary, owing to the Secret Service team surrounding him at all times. “We may have a group mugshot,” the official says. “I wish I was joking, I’m not.”

    Within Trumpworld, that image is far from a cause for concern. “What a great cartoon,” scoffs the source close to Trump’s legal team. “They have to be close to him, so what? Trump’s mug shot will be the former president surrounded by 12 guys in suits with guns wearing sunglasses?”

    The source noted that, after Trump predicted his imminent arrest, his campaign has said it is experiencing a sharp increase in contributions. Politico reported Friday that polling suggests the indictment has, thus far, boosted Trump’s standing among Republican primary voters — but may hurt him in the general election.

    Trump’s arrest will come after a grand jury indictment driven by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg. The indictment is still sealed, but Bragg appears to be investigating Trump’s dealings surrounding a hush money payment made to adult film actress Stormy Daniels in the weeks ahead of the election. If Trump falsified business records in that payment — which Daniels says were made to keep her from discussing what she says was a sexual encounter with Trump — it could constitute a violation of New York law done in furtherance of a violation of campaign finance laws.

    As details of Bragg’s plans leaked, Trump announced his own impending arrest on social media, saying incorrectly it would occur on March 28 and calling on his supporters to protest. Rolling Stone previously reported that, in the aftermath of that call, law enforcement agencies circulated intelligence bulletins warning of an increase in online threats and the potential for violence. Law enforcement and intelligence officials say activity tonight outside Trump Tower will offer clues about how Tuesday will go. “If protesters get crazy tonight and clash with counter-protesters outside Trump Tower then we’d expect tomorrow to go the same way,” the law enforcement official said. “Our eyes are on Trump Tower tonight. This is why we just don’t know how it will go. We are preparing for the worst but hoping for the best. Maybe there will be riots tonight, maybe people are tired of this and don’t really care. Don’t know. We’ll see.”

    There are three scheduled protests. The first is Monday night outside Trump Tower, and two groups have permits to protest on Tuesday.

    The law enforcement official says NYPD were preparing for potential riots or violence, though there is no indication either are expected. In an emailed statement to Rolling Stone, NYPD writes: “The NYPD ensures thousands of events, including first amendment activities, are conducted safely in New York City each year. Officers have been placed on alert and the department remains ready to respond as needed and will ensure everyone is able to peacefully exercise their rights. There are no current credible threats to New York City.”

    Bragg’s investigation is one of several Trump faces. He is the target of two Special Counsel federal probes out of Washington, one related to classified docs brought to Mar-a-Lago and the other to efforts to overturn his 2020 presidential election loss to President Biden. A fourth investigation, out of Georgia, is also probing allegations involving efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election.
    _______

    Always the martyr, always the victim. Let no one say that Trump doesn't know how to market himself to his base. The man is a master showman, that's for damn sure.
    “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

    Comment


    • Former Manhattan DA finally reveals why Trump wasn’t charged earlier in hush money case

      The former district attorney for Manhattan has finally shed some light on why Donald Trump is just now being charged over allegedly criminal activity which occurred as far back as 2016.

      Cy Vance appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday to discuss news of the criminal indictment against the former president, which a grand jury voted to approve a few days earlier. During the interview, he was asked why his office did not empanel a grand jury during the Trump presidency to hear evidence related to Mr Trump’s hush payments to Stormy Daniels.

      Mr Vance replied that the Department of Justice, which typically holds seniority when it comes to investigating crimes, had asked his office to stand down its investigation into numerous aspects of the former president’s activities, presumably including the hush payments to Ms Daniels. Mr Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen would end up going to prison as a result of those payments, which prosecutors argued were illegal campaign contributions for reasons of both their size and secrecy.

      The exact charges Mr Trump now faces are set to be unveiled on Tuesday at his arraignment; it has been reported that he faces 32 counts in total.

      “Why didn't you charge the hush money case?” asked host Chuck Todd. “Why didn't you ever charge it in 2018, 2019, 2020?”

      “[A]s I believe you know, I was asked by the US Attorney's Office in the Southern District to stand down on our investigation, which had commenced involving the Trump Organization,” said Mr Vance. “And as, you know, as someone who respects that office a great deal, and believing that they may have perhaps the best laws to investigate, I did so.”

      But Mr Vance went on to say that he was surprised by – and apparently disagreed with – the decision of federal prosecutors not to pursue criminal charges against Mr Trump over the matter at the time.

      “I was somewhat surprised after Mr Cohen pleaded guilty that the federal government did not proceed on the areas in which it asked me to stand down,” said the former DA.

      The comments were surprisingly candid for a former prosecutor. Statements about internal deliberations leading to the decisions behind prosecutorial discrection are rare, even for retired professionals in the field. Much of the news about such deliberations in the current Manhattan case being headed up by Alvin Bragg has come in the form of leaks from individuals connected to the probe, which has infuriated Mr Trump’s legal team and led to more accusations of bias.

      Mr Trump famously escaped any criminal charges stemming from the years-long investigation into his 2016 campaign; that probe famously ensnared a number of others connected to his first presidential bid, including his campaign chairman and first White House national security adviser. That decision enraged many Democrats who had been hoping the Justice Department would break its longstanding protocol and charge a sitting president with criminal offences.

      The former president now faces a cascade of criminal and legal battles as he campaigns once again for the presidency, several of which stem from his actions taken to prevent Joe Biden’s lawful victory in 2020.
      ___________

      Huge surprise. The DoJ asked Vance to stand down. Unbelievably naïve or deliberately disingenuous of him to assume that the DoJ would actually investigate a sitting president...especially one who corrupts everything he touches.
      “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

      Comment


      • Marjorie Taylor Greene comparing Trump to Jesus and Nelson Mandela as other great men put behind bars.

        You expect it, you’re not surprised, and it never gets old. Lol!

        Comment


        • Village Idiot speaks
          “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
          Mark Twain

          Comment


          • And the other village idiot sits before a judge, finally.

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            “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

            Comment


            • From my brother, the retired New York State Superior Judge:

              I am underwhelmed by the Trump indictment. Even if convicted on all 34 counts (doubtful), most would not get jail in NYS. All are misdemeanors, pumped up to the lowest (E) felony.
              My read: Well it’s not exactly Al Capone getting charged for mail fraud but it’s a start. I’m hanging my hat on Georgia & DOJ.
              “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
              Mark Twain

              Comment


              • I'm waiting for the gag order. He'll be advised by the Judge to not talk about the case and of course he will within 24 hours. Then comes the gag order. I wonder if the Judge would let me be the one to stick the gag in his mouth? Really deep...

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                  From my brother, the retired New York State Superior Judge

                  My read: Well it’s not exactly Al Capone getting charged for mail fraud but it’s a start. I’m hanging my hat on Georgia & DOJ.
                  Ditto. Like I said, this is just the opening act. It won't see trial for another year, at least. The DoJ's presumed trials will start before this one does and he hasn't even been indicted yet.

                  The importance of New York is that the "taboo" of indicting a former president has been broken, and the fear of indicting the Leader of Cult45 for fear of violence has also been broken.

                  Trump's Deranged Supporters are still willing to wave their flags

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                  and get their tattoos

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                  But this is almost certainly never to be repeated:

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                  “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
                    I'm waiting for the gag order. He'll be advised by the Judge to not talk about the case and of course he will within 24 hours. Then comes the gag order. I wonder if the Judge would let me be the one to stick the gag in his mouth? Really deep...
                    There won't be one. AG Bragg didn't ask for one and Judge Merchan wouldn't have granted it in any case.

                    Personally I want him to keep talking. The greatest gift a prosecutor could ask for is Trump's narcissistic inability to avoid incriminating himself. Just look at the gift he handed Jack Smith during the Hannity interview.

                    Edit: The judge did warn Trump about making certain kinds of statements though:

                    The prosecution raised concerns that Trump had made threatening statements on social media toward “our cities, our courts and our justice system,” citing “death and destruction” and “World War III,” as well as posting an image of himself holding a baseball bat next to a photo of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.

                    Trump’s defense attorneys said that the former president is entitled to discuss the case, but conceded that Trump had responded “forcefully” because he is “frustrated and upset.” Judge Juan Merchan told the legal teams to instruct their witnesses to refrain from making statements that have the “potential to incite violence and unrest” and not to make statements that undermine the rule of law.
                    So, when Trump inevitably does exactly that, or tries to at least dog whistle his followers, we'll see what Judge Merchan does about it...if anything.
                    “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                      So, when Trump inevitably does exactly that, or tries to at least dog whistle his followers, we'll see what Judge Merchan does about it...if anything.
                      The drill is usually a warning from the bench to the defendant directly (and a reminder to his solicitor), then depending on what the defendant says or does next a second warning. Third time the charm though and its cell time. Perhaps only a couple of hours perhaps a couple of days. The judge can also potentially order him off all forms of social media if that is where comments were made. If that doesn't work it could be jail for the duration of the trial (which judges and lawyers hate BTW in cases like this because it opens up avenue for appeal re: fairness) or perhaps house arrest.

                      If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Monash View Post

                        The drill is usually a warning from the bench to the defendant directly (and a reminder to his solicitor), then depending on what the defendant says or does next a second warning. Third time the charm though and its cell time. Perhaps only a couple of hours perhaps a couple of days. The judge can also potentially order him off all forms of social media if that is where comments were made. If that doesn't work it could be jail for the duration of the trial (which judges and lawyers hate BTW in cases like this because it opens up avenue for appeal re: fairness) or perhaps house arrest.
                        Once again, always nice to have experts on hand
                        “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                        Comment


                        • The Case Against Trump: The Charges and the Facts Behind Them
                          Here’s what’s new (and what’s not) in the Manhattan DA’s indictment of Trump.



                          The Manhattan grand jury’s indictment of former President Donald J. Trump was unsealed today following his historic arrest, booking, and plea of not guilty. The 34-count indictment charges Trump with falsifying business records in the first degree under New York Penal Law 175.10 involving—among other things—his alleged payment of $130,000 to adult film star Stormy Daniels to keep her quiet about his sexual relationship with her, which he denies, in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. Manhattan D.A. Alvin Bragg identifies multiple hush-money payments for which Trump allegedly reimbursed his former attorney Michael Cohen, plus a series of actions to hide the payments, falsely claiming in a series of records that the money paid Cohen was for legal fees.

                          The charging documents also outline a pressure campaign, allegedly orchestrated by Trump, to keep Cohen quiet once the FBI caught on to things in April 2018.

                          In a press conference after the arraignment, Bragg framed the case as being about “34 false statements made to cover up other crimes,” including “New York election law,” which makes it “a crime to conspire to promote a candidacy by unlawful means,” as well as a “federal election law cap on contribution limits” in campaigns. These underlying crimes are what make the counts of falsifying records felonies (rather than misdemeanors) within the applicable statute of limitations, although the charging documents don’t outline those laws in any detail. Because Manhattan is the “financial center of the world,” with an interest in “true and accurate record-keeping,” Bragg stated, his office is the right one to bring this case.

                          An accompanying “Statement of Facts” from Bragg’s office lays out the details. Cohen, who pleaded guilty to eight federal charges arising from the Stormy Daniels payoff, including tax evasion, bank fraud, and campaign finance violations, figures prominently in the record. After an FBI search of the home and offices of Cohen (called “Attorney A” in the document), Trump allegedly told him to “stay strong,” and on April 21, 2018, he sent a tweet encouraging Cohen not to “flip.” These kinds of details bear, for example, on whether Trump had the requisite criminal intent to dupe voters about the election when he engaged in the hush-money schemes, rather than aiming only to avert his wife’s ire.

                          But contrary to the expectations of many commentators, Bragg’s case does not hinge exclusively on Cohen’s testimony. The potential testimony of a number of other people is discussed in the statement of facts, including:
                          • A former Trump Tower doorman who was allegedly trying to sell information regarding a child he claimed Trump fathered out of wedlock, and whom American Media, Inc. (AMI), paid $30,000 for exclusive rights to the story.
                          • Woman 1, who is presumably Karen McDougal, another woman who received $150,000 in hush money from the Trump team and “alleged she had a sexual relationship with the Defendant while he was married.” When Cohen told Trump that he’d open up a company for the transfer of money to McDougal, Trump asked: “‘So what do we got to pay for this? One fifty?’ and suggested paying by cash.”
                          • David Pecker, chairman and chief executive officer of AMI, which owned the National Enquirer. The indictment alleges:
                          In or about September 2018, AMI entered into a non-prosecution agreement with the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York in connection with AMI’s payoff of Woman 1, admitting that “[a]t no time during the negotiation or acquisition of [Woman 1’s] story did AMI intend to publish the story or disseminate information about it publicly.”

                          Allegedly, AMI admitted that it made the payment to ensure that Woman 1 “did not publicize damaging allegations” about Trump “before the 2016 presidential election and thereby influence that election.”
                          • AMI’s chief content officer, who contacted Cohen about McDougal and was involved in other parts of the scheme.
                          • Woman 2, who is presumably Stormy Daniels.
                          • Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization chief financial officer, who pleaded guilty to a 15-year tax fraud scheme in connection with the company.
                          • Lawyer B, who was counsel for Daniels, and negotiated the deal with Cohen and received a $30,000 wire on her behalf.
                          • The Trump Organization’s controller, who was involved in the invoicing of the “retainer” repayments to Cohen, but doesn’t necessarily know anything about Trump’s state of mind.
                          • The Trump Organization’s accounts payable supervisor, who recorded each payment from the Trump Organization’s electronic accounting system, and likewise might not know about Trump’s intentions.
                          • Lawyer C, who in April 2018, offered a backchannel between Cohen and Trump, writing, “you have friends in high places.” This person’s testimony could conceivably link the scheme to Trump himself. The charging documents continue:
                          On or about June 14, 2018, Lawyer C emailed Lawyer A a news clip discussing the possibility of Lawyer A cooperating, and continued to urge him not to cooperate with law enforcement, writing, “The whole objective of this exercise by the [federal prosecutors] is to drain you, emotionally and financially, until you reach a point that you see them as your only means to salvation.” In the same email , Lawyer C, wrote, “You are making a very big mistake if you believe the stories these ‘journalists’ are writing about you. They want you to cave. They want you to fail. They do not want you to persevere and succeed.”
                          • Lawyer D, Cohen’s lawyer, who had close relationship with Lawyer C and communicated with Lawyer C about Cohen not cooperating with the government.


                          At this stage, the public has no sense of the additional evidence Bragg’s grand jury has undoubtedly accumulated in the form of written records or perhaps even audiotape evidence to back up the fundamental theory that Trump engaged in this elaborate silencing scheme to help him win the presidency. And we won’t know more for some time.

                          The government has asked the judge for a January 16, 2024 trial date—two weeks before the currently scheduled date of the New Hampshire primary for the 2024 presidential race. Trump’s lawyers made a bid for trial to begin later that spring. The case will likely be delayed in any event, while Trump’s lawyers file a wave of motions to dismiss the indictment or reduce the charges to a misdemeanor (which would fall outside the statute of limitations) and, failing that, to narrow the evidence that goes to the jury, among other things.

                          Meanwhile, Special Counsel Jack Smith continues apace with his investigations of Trump’s role in the attempts to subvert the 2020 election (including the January 6th insurrection) and his Mar-a-Lago withholding of presidential records from the government. Not to mention the Fulton County, Georgia D.A.’s probe of Trump’s efforts to get officials to “find” votes to swing that state in his column in 2020, or the Justice Department and SEC’s investigation of his Truth Social initial public offering.

                          But by the time any additional indictments issue, the collective shock of indicting a former president will have worn off. Ultimately, this one will be resolved not by politics, but by the rule of law.
                          _____
                          “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                          Comment


                          • Trump Struggles to Defend Himself in Bizarre Post-Arrest Speech



                            After a day of historic indignity — spent getting booked and arraigned at a Manhattan courthouse — former president Donald Trump retreated to his safe space, Mar-a-Lago, where he delivered an embittered televised address to the nation.

                            Trump entered his ballroom to the strains of Lee Greenwood’s “I’m Proud to be an American.” The crowd chanted “USA! USA!” as he took the podium in front of a backdrop of American flags, ready to reassert himself after a day of powerlessness in court.

                            But Trump’s delivery was drained as he rattled through an endless litany of conspiracy and complaint, not only about the day’s criminal proceedings but about the “onslaught of fraudulent investigations” he claims are unfairly targeting him, ranging from “Russia, Russia, Russia,” to the dual impeachment “hoaxes,” to the “boxes hoax” (his new term for his mishandling of classified documents at his Florida resort), to his “persecution” at the hands of New York Attorney General Letitia James.

                            Trump took advantage of the free air time to proclaim his innocence: “The only crime I have committed is to fearlessly defend our nation from those who seek to destroy it.”

                            A key purpose of Trump’s speech seemed to be priming his faithful for additional prosecutions that may soon be incoming. He blasted the “local racist” prosecutor in Georgia who is investigating his election interference in that state. (In an odd throwback to his impeachment over Ukraine, Trump characterized his haranguing of Georgia election officials as another “perfect phone call.”)

                            Similarly, Trump trashed the “radical-left lunatic bomb-thrower” Jack Smith, whom Attorney General Merrick Garland tapped to lead federal investigations into his document scandal and his efforts to subvert the 2020 election.

                            And despite a caution from the judge in his Manhattan case to lower the temperature, Trump specifically lashed out at the New York jurist: “I have a Trump-hating judge,” he insisted. He also bashed the Manhattan DA who just indicted him, calling him the “radical-left George Soros-backed prosecutor Alvin Bragg.”

                            Throughout his campaign-style speech — in which he name checked the “Hunter Biden laptop from hell” and wove in references to Hillary Clinton’s emails — Trump spun a narrative that he, instead of being the perpetrator of a crime, is now a conservative martyr, subject to baseless political slings and arrows.

                            To be clear: Trump today was charged with 34 felony counts of falsifying business records to illegally cover up a hush money payment to a porn star who alleges she carried on an affair with him beginning in 2006, shortly after the birth of his fifth child to his third wife.

                            Trump, the charging documents assert, cheated in the 2016 election — orchestrating a payment to Daniels to prevent an explosive story from coming to light that October — and then cheated through his business accounting to cover it up. Trump even used a White House meeting in the Oval Office to shore up the particulars of the crime. Trump’s fixer in this case, his former attorney Michael Cohen, has already served federal prison time for his role in the scheme, and the new charging documents insist that Cohen acted at Trump’s explicit direction.

                            But from Trump’s perspective, he is blameless.

                            During his Mar-a-Lago address, Trump insisted, “There’s no case. There’s no case!” Retreating into projection, Trump claimed the prosecutor was the one who should be on trial: “The criminal is the district attorney,” Trump insisted, alleging that Bragg “illegally leaked grand jury information” and should resign.

                            Cutting his speech short after just half an hour, Trump seemed absorbed by the trauma of the day’s events. When he railed against the “crippled economy,” the shame of the Afghanistan withdrawal, and a nation “going to hell,” he seemed lost in the darkness, a lonely troubled man sunk in his own emotional well. He wants Americans to make him president again.
                            __________

                            Notice that he hasn't said he 'didn't do it', but rather he didn't commit a crime. Sounds like in his fantasy world what he did isn't a crime, even though laws that are on the books say otherwise.
                            “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                            Comment


                            • From Reuters: Trump posts claim that Republicans in Congress should vote to defund the FBI and DoJ. (But only until they drop their investigations into his conduct of course).

                              https://www.reuters.com/world/us/tru...bi-2023-04-05/.

                              Seems legit. But who knew Donald could channel his inner 'wokeness' that way.
                              Last edited by Monash; 05 Apr 23,, 23:23.
                              If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Monash View Post
                                From Reuters: Trump posts claim that Republicans in Congress should vote to defund the FBI and DoJ. (But only until they drop their investigations into his conduct of course).

                                https://www.reuters.com/world/us/tru...bi-2023-04-05/.

                                Seems legit. But who knew Donald could channel his inner 'wokeness' that way.
                                Suddenly defunding law enforcement is a Republican battle cry.... I wonder what changed?
                                “He was the most prodigious personification of all human inferiorities. He was an utterly incapable, unadapted, irresponsible, psychopathic personality, full of empty, infantile fantasies, but cursed with the keen intuition of a rat or a guttersnipe. He represented the shadow, the inferior part of everybody’s personality, in an overwhelming degree, and this was another reason why they fell for him.”

                                Comment

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