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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    lol experienced in watching salvagers pick up the pallets (and crates that I can't be bothered to bust down) that I leave outside the building for them.

    Speaking of which, there's a 8 or 9 pallets that have been sitting outside for a couple weeks now, kind weird. And they'll have company on Monday when we clear out of a metric shit ton of empty crates.

    Sure hope somebody comes by and grabs them.
    I used to hit up local companies for pallets so we could use them in the campsites at our 2 Scout camps to stack campfire wood. we are on the edge of the fall line and the soil is always wet. A pile of seasoned wood will rot in a season if not protected from below.

    Been out of Scouting for 10 years...wonder what the situation is now.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    You sound....experienced.
    lol experienced in watching salvagers pick up the pallets (and crates that I can't be bothered to bust down) that I leave outside the building for them.

    Speaking of which, there's a 8 or 9 pallets that have been sitting outside for a couple weeks now, kind weird. And they'll have company on Monday when we clear out of a metric shit ton of empty crates.

    Sure hope somebody comes by and grabs them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post

    Decent sized pickup truck, or stripped down second-hand delivery truck of some kind, then head to the nearest logistics company, easy-peasy.
    You sound....experienced.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by DOR View Post
    Remember all that talk about stagflation?
    In real terms, retail sales rose 14.1%
    last year ... and 12.9% over 2019. Oops.
    I think that the concern is not a retrospective viewpoint, but rather an expectation of near future stagflation (later this year and for the next few years), which some think may occur after the Fed begins to rein in inflation, while that tigher monetary policy competes with inflation momentum and long term Federal fiscal stimulous spending.

    Last edited by JRT; 15 Jan 22,, 22:13.

    Leave a comment:


  • DOR
    replied
    Remember all that talk about stagflation?
    In real terms, retail sales rose 14.1% last year … and 12.9% over 2019.


    Oops.



    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by Bloomberg_Markets_and_Finance

    Powell: Fed Likely to Allow Balance-Sheet Runoff in 2022
    11 January 2022

    Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says he is "confident" the central bank will achieve price stability in a response to Senator Richard Shelby during testimony before the Senate Banking Committee.

    .

    ...

    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by Bloomberg_Markets_and_Finance

    Massively Overheated Labor Market
    14 January 2022

    Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers discusses why he believes our economy is overheating and what needs to be done to mitigate rising inflation.

    .

    ...

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post

    Ok. Copper wire and to some extent a catalytic converter are easy to transport in car or pickup. How the heck do thieves transport a dozen or more pallets and where to? Not recycle centers like copper wire.
    Decent sized pickup truck, or stripped down second-hand delivery truck of some kind, then head to the nearest logistics company, easy-peasy.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
    Even before the pandemic or Hurricane Michael pallet thief was a big problem. With many companies that delivered product on a pallet charging a $50 deposit for them
    Ok. Copper wire and to some extent a catalytic converter are easy to transport in car or pickup. How the heck do thieves transport a dozen or more pallets and where to? Not recycle centers like copper wire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gun Grape
    replied
    Even before the pandemic or Hurricane Michael pallet thief was a big problem. With many companies that delivered product on a pallet charging a $50 deposit for them

    Leave a comment:


  • zraver
    replied
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
    LOL, I can just see pallets being added to copper wiring and catalytic converters as items to steal for cash.
    Drive behind a big box store. They have signs up. Pallet theft is already a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    LOL, I can just see pallets being added to copper wiring and catalytic converters as items to steal for cash.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    We were talking previously about warehousing a few days ago. Here is a fascinating story from last evening's Marketplace


    It's worth a listen

    https://www.marketplace.org/2021/12/...wner-predicts/


    Prices will remain high, California warehouse owner predicts

    David Erlanger’s warehouse and distribution business in Riverside, California, is full to the brim with boxes of wineglasses, luggage, bedsheets and more.

    After container ships are unloaded at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, drayage companies truck individual shipping containers to warehouses like Erlanger’s, many of which are an hour inland in Riverside. Between shipping delays and consumers spending more on goods than prior to the pandemic, Erlanger has never seen anything like this in his nearly 40 years in the business.

    The president and CEO of Erlanger Distribution Center gave “Marketplace” host Kai Ryssdal a tour of one of his two warehouses, which occupy around 200,000 square feet.

    Erlanger started working at the family business in 1984 and bought the company — where his own son now works — from his father about a decade ago. Erlanger Distribution Center employs between 40 and 60 people, with the number increasing during busy periods like the holidays. It works with importers that sell to major retailers like Walmart and Dollar General or ship directly to consumers.

    “You’re looking at merchandise that’s come in. We’re palletizing and shipping it,” Erlanger said. “And a lot of it, because of the problems at the harbor, is staying.”
    Sign up for the daily Marketplace newsletter to make sense of the most important business and economic news.


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    On Nov. 12, Erlanger received containers that carried Halloween goods for one of the importers he works with. Because of the late arrival, Erlanger will store the products for another year until his customer can sell them. In addition to the delays of products coming into the warehouse, the containers Erlanger’s team has already emptied are being picked up late to go back to the ports.

    “I’ve got 14 containers between here and the other warehouse that are empty and waiting for pickup,” Erlanger said. Before the pandemic, it was normal to have only two empties sitting outside.

    “We try to get it out right away,” Erlanger said. “We’ll have labels ready, truckers ready for appointments. But one, the trucker may not come to pick it up because that trucker may be late for someone else or overbooked. And then the other thing that happens is we may not get the container.”

    Recently, Erlanger and his crew have been prepared to receive six to eight containers a day at the warehouse. But because of delays, only one gets delivered.

    “It then means that those containers come in later, so now it’s a Saturday that we have to work,” Erlanger said. “So, it’s an overtime day. There’s some tremendous expenses if it’s not timed right.”

    Despite the delays, Erlanger Distribution Center is on track for a record year. Many of the increased costs of shipping — like container rates or trucking fees — are paid by Erlanger’s customers, the importers. His warehouse is filled to the rafters with imported goods stacked up on wooden pallets, with even more products blocking some aisles.

    “We tried to buy another warehouse,” Erlanger said, but they struggled to find space. “We got [a Small Business Administration] loan for around $12 million and couldn’t find anything. It’s tight, and now it’s moving out to Banning or Beaumont,” which are California cities farther away from the ports.

    As a pivot point between importers and retailers, Erlanger doesn’t see our global supply chain issues coming to an end in the near future. Much of it, he thinks, will come down to time and the pandemic easing up. And he predicts prices will remain high.

    Everything at Erlanger Distribution Center is stored on wooden pallets, and pallet prices have climbed from $5 pre-pandemic to $12 to $20 per unit.

    “That’s a heck of an increase,” Erlanger said. “And of course, that gets passed on, so somebody is going to end up paying for it. And when things get back to normal, when do prices go down?”

    Leave a comment:


  • DOR
    replied
    More Inflation

    The consumer price index (CPI), the most widely used measure of price changes, rose nearly 7% in November, after a series of stiff increases since April. But, comparison to 2020 – the Year of the Disease – doesn't make much sense, since everything is out of whack (that's a technical term).

    So, to put it in perspective, the CPI is 21.5% higher than it was 10 years ago (I'm using the average of the past six months, vs. the same 2011 period), and 54.3% higher than 20 years ago, in 2001.

    That's the benchmark: +21.5% over 10 years, and +54.3% over 20.

    Ten years ago, gasoline was $3.72 gallon (US urban average), 8.8% less than the average over the past six months. Unleaded was 10.1% cheaper, and No. 2 heating oil 16.1% less costly. Over 20 years, gas is up 110-115% and heating fuel 145%.

    Here's some other comparisons

    2021 vs._ _ 10 Years Ago _ _ 20 Years Ago

    CPI _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _+21.5% _ _ _ +54.3%

    Flour _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -29.7% _ _ _ _ +21.4%

    Spaghetti _ _ _ _ _ -14.3% _ _ _ _ +17.9%

    American Cheese _ -4.1% _ _ _ _ +1.0%

    Cheddar Cheese _ _ -3.9% _ _ _ _+31.8%

    Whole Milk _ _ _ _ -1.4% _ _ _ +23.6%

    Eggs _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -1.7% _ _ _ _ +91.1%

    Bananas _ _ _ _ _ _ -1.9% _ _ _ _ +17.1%

    Coffee _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -14% _ _ _ _ +53.2%

    Ice Cream _ _ _ _ _ +0.8% _ _ _ _ +30.3%

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by DOR View Post

    Some of that consideration will be what other uses that ship might have. If demand is slack, it might be better to keep it at sea a bit longer.
    Another consideration is when space will be available at the desired port. If space is available / cheaper next week, a longer trip might make sense.
    A third one: repositioning ships from Pacific to Atlantic.
    Yeah, I heard the same thing on, go figure, Marketplace the other night. They called the director of Port of Los Angeles/Long Beach. He reported the line of ships in port waiting to unload is getting smaller. But meanwhile there are a bunch of ships slowing their roll in the Pacific so they don't get hit with demurrage fees.


    Ands BTW, gas is $2.99 a gallon in Central/South Virginia, down about $.30 from 6 weeks or so ago.

    Leave a comment:

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