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2021 Trump-Incited Insurrection at Capitol Building

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  • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    these folks ain't in the military...different ball of wax.
    I know. The number of "unauthorized to talk" interviews to reporters astound my mind but still, people of Pelosi's level need aides who can keep things secured not just from the Russians but she needs them secured against the Republicans. I can't imagine anyone working for her would keep his/her job if it was to be found out that she/he leak things to the Republicans.

    Chimo

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    • Georgia lawyer said he kicked in Pelosi's door, she could've been 'torn into little pieces'

      A Georgia lawyer boasted that he and fellow rioters "kicked in Nancy Pelosi's office door" and the House speaker dodged being "torn into little pieces," according to a criminal complaint.

      William McCall Calhoun Jr., an attorney from Americus, Georgia, has been charged with entering a restricted building, violent or disorderly conduct and obstructing official proceedings of government, according to an FBI affidavit seeking his arrest.

      The FBI's National Threat operation Center received a tip that Calhoun documented — in words and video on social media — his role in the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol Building, according to the affidavit.

      Thousands of supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol in hopes of stopping Congress from formalizing President-elect Joe Biden's victory. At least five people died as a result of the violence.

      Calhoun said the "mob" searched through Pelosi's "inner sanctum," according to his Facebook post cited in the affidavit.

      "And get this - the first of us who got upstairs kicked in Nancy Pelosi's office door and pushed down the hall towards her inner sanctum, the mob howling with rage," Calhoun wrote, according to the FBI.

      "Crazy Nancy probably would have been torn into little pieces but she was nowhere to be seen."


      Calhoun's Facebook and Parler accounts, cited in the affidavit, appeared to be deleted by Tuesday afternoon.

      The suspected rioter was taken into custody on Friday and will remain in jail until his bail hearing on Thursday, according to a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Middle District of Georgia.

      An attorney for Calhoun did not immediately return messages seeking comment.

      Calhoun, who practices criminal and insurance law, was in good standing and has not been targeted for any discipline, according to Georgia Bar Association records.

      A spokesman for the association declined to discuss Calhoun on Tuesday afternoon but said in a statement: "The Bar only has jurisdiction over lawyers in their professional lives, so the rules do not cover personal conduct unless a member is convicted of a crime."

      He's been licensed to practice law in Georgia since 1990.
      _______

      Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

      Comment


      • Originally posted by astralis View Post

        doesn't even need to be civilian; plenty of military folks blow at following basic security protocols-- which is why anyone who has worked in the government the last, oh 15 years or so, is deathly familiar of Jeff and Tina.

        same with the CIA -- the hack of its communications systems resulted in the destruction of US agent networks in Iran and China.

        in any case, regarding Pelosi's laptop, etc, looked like the stupid girl just took up a target of opportunity. it's highly unlikely there was anything super classified on it.
        There was nothing classified on that computer...or any computer in that office...higher than, at most, For Official Use Only (FOUO).

        None of that space is cleared for that level of electronic media.

        There may be safe's with classified documents, etc., but nothing in that space attached to that network.

        There are separate spaces for those kind of computers...and any attempt to get in there would have been a bloodbath because that is a lethal force use area.

        So what was on that computer is, at worst, politically damaging but not security damaging.
        “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
        Mark Twain

        Comment


        • Nearly 1 In 5 Defendants In Capitol Riot Cases Served In The Military

          As a violent mob descended on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, lawmakers and aides hid wherever they could, waiting for the military and police to arrive. But many of those who stormed the Capitol were military veterans themselves, who had once sworn to protect the Constitution. In fact, an NPR analysis has found that nearly 1 in 5 people charged over their alleged involvement in the attack on the U.S. Capitol appear to have a military history.

          NPR compiled a list of individuals facing federal or District of Columbia charges in connection with the events of Jan. 6. Of more than 140 charged so far, a review of military records, social media accounts, court documents and news reports indicate at least 27 of those charged, or nearly 20%, have served or are currently serving in the U.S. military. To put that number in perspective, only about 7% of all American adults are military veterans, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

          Several veterans are charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. One of them is Larry Rendall Brock Jr. The Air Force veteran was photographed in a military-style helmet and tactical vest carrying flex cuffs inside the Capitol. He posted on Facebook that he was preparing for a "Second Civil War," according to documents filed in federal court. In the weeks after Biden's victory, Brock posted that "we are now under occupation by a hostile governing force."

          "I see no distinction between a group of Americans seizing power and governing with complete disregard to the Constitution and an invading force of Chinese communists accomplishing the same objective," Brock wrote. (There is no credible evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election.) He ended his post with a reference to the oath taken by members of the military: "Against all enemies foreign and domestic."

          Some veterans who allegedly stormed the Capitol are still serving in some capacity. Jacob Fracker, 29, was an infantry rifleman in the Marine Corps and deployed to Afghanistan twice, according to the Pentagon. He now serves in the Virginia National Guard, according to widespread news reports, though he was not among the service members deployed to Washington ahead of the inauguration. He is also a police officer in Rocky Mount, Va. With him at the Capitol on Jan. 6 was his colleague from the Rocky Mount Police Department, Thomas Robertson, 47, who is an Army veteran also facing charges.

          Federal prosecutors have also alleged that multiple members of the right-wing extremist group the Oath Keepers took part in the "incursion" at the Capitol. The group has been known to target and recruit active-duty members of the military and veterans, in part for their specialized skills. Among those charged in relation to the storming of the Capitol are Thomas Edward Caldwell, a Navy veteran and alleged leader among the Oath Keepers, and Donovan Ray Crowl, a Marine Corps veteran. They have been charged with conspiracy to obstruct the Electoral College vote, among other alleged crimes.

          Attorneys representing those facing charges did not respond to NPR's messages seeking comment.

          Rooting out extremism

          Roughly one-third of active duty troops said they had "personally witnessed examples of white nationalism or ideological-driven racism within the ranks in recent months," according to a 2019 survey conducted by the Military Times and Syracuse University Institute for Veterans and Military Families. Troops said they had seen "swastikas being drawn on service members' cars, tattoos affiliated with white supremacist groups, stickers supporting the Ku Klux Klan and Nazi-style salutes between individuals."

          At least one individual charged in connection with the assault on the Capitol allegedly embraced that extremist ideology. Timothy Louis Hale-Cusanelli, 30, is a Navy contractor who has worked at a naval weapons station with a secret security clearance, according to court documents. He is also an Army Reserve sergeant in the 174th Infantry Brigade and an "avowed white supremacist and Nazi sympathizer," according to court documents.

          Some experts argue the military has not done enough to tamp down on extremism in its ranks.

          Mark Pitcavage, a senior research fellow with the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism, called the military's efforts largely "haphazard."

          "It's not like the military is just tolerating white supremacists," Pitcavage told NPR. But he said efforts to address the problem need to be more systematic.

          "Not only does there need to be training," Pitcavage said, "but there also need to be clear expectations coming down from on high about what you should do when you encounter an extremist in your unit, at your base or whatever the circumstances are, and that here are the procedures that need to be followed."

          The problem is not entirely lost on the Defense Department. After the Jan. 6 insurrection, a senior defense official told NPR there were 68 notifications of investigations by the FBI last year of former and current military members pertaining to domestic extremism.

          When extremism in the military does go undetected or ignored, the stakes can be high.

          As Heidi Beirich, co-founder of the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism, testified to Congress, veterans and military personnel "have training that makes terrorist attacks more achievable and more deadly."

          In 2019, federal prosecutors said that Coast Guard Lt. Christopher Hasson had planned a series of violent attacks against liberal politicians, and was an avowed white nationalist for decades. Hasson ultimately pleaded guilty to drug and weapons charges.

          Timothy McVeigh, who carried out the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people, was an Army veteran who served in the Persian Gulf War. He had taken inspiration from the white supremacist novel "The Turner Diaries," which continues to hold sway among far-right extremists.


          Pitcavage cautions that there is limited evidence military veterans are more susceptible to extremist ideology than any other group of Americans.

          "Overall, our veteran population is largely reflective of our general population," Pitcavage said.

          Veterans, for example, have also been on the front lines of the fight against extremism. Brian Sicknick, the police officer who died trying to prevent the mob from storming the Capitol, was also a veteran.

          The New Jersey Air National Guard, where Sicknick served, said, "Staff Sgt. Sicknick's commitment to service and to protect his community, state, and nation will never be forgotten."

          In his inaugural address on Wednesday, President Biden pledged to combat "a rise of political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism."

          Likewise, Biden's pick to lead the Department of Defense, retired Gen. Lloyd Austin, told Congress on Tuesday that, if confirmed, he would work to combat extremism in the military, a problem the Defense Department acknowledged in a report in December.

          Austin, who would be the nation's first Black defense secretary, said he would fight hard "to rid our ranks of racists."

          "The Defense Department's job is to keep America safe from our enemies," he testified. "But we can't do that if some of those enemies lie within our own ranks."
          ______________

          These men and women launched an insurrection against the government on behalf of a man that despises them and everything they swore an oath to defend. How incredibly sad.
          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

          Comment


          • Cop's Son Who Punched Officer In Capitol Attack Has A Brother In The Secret Service

            A Donald Trump-loving gym owner who authorities say attacked a police officer during the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is the son of a deceased New Jersey trooper and has a brother in the U.S. Secret Service, HuffPost has learned.

            Scott Kevin Fairlamb, the owner of Fairlamb Fit and a former ultimate fighter, is the son of retired New Jersey Trooper Preston “Jay” Fairlamb Jr., who died in a 2012 motorcycle crash. Michelle Obama, the first lady at the time, attended a memorial service for the elder Fairlamb because his other son, Preston “Jay” Fairlamb III, had led her Secret Service detail. Obama even mentioned Preston Fairlamb III in her recent memoir, writing that they “became real friends” and shared stories and jokes.

            A website for Scott Fairlamb’s 2019 wedding lists his best man as “Jay,” and one acquaintance confirmed that the longtime Service Service agent was in his brother’s wedding party. Multiple sources and public records confirm their relationship.

            There’s no indication that Preston Fairlamb III, who is listed on LinkedIn as resident agent-in-charge of the Trenton, New Jersey, office of the Secret Service, was aware of his brother’s activities at the Capitol this month. The criminal complaint against Scott Fairlamb, authored by an unnamed FBI agent, does not give any specific sign that Agent Fairlamb helped bring his brother to justice.

            The U.S. Secret Service did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

            Scott Fairlamb faces a civil disorder charge, a charge of assaulting a federal officer, a charge of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, a count of carrying a dangerous weapon, and a charge of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

            Two of the charges against Scott Fairlamb apply because he was in a restricted area where a person protected by the Secret Service ― in this case, Vice President Mike Pence ― was visiting. Pence was at the Capitol to oversee the certification of the Electoral College vote count, which then-President Trump and his supporters sought to stop and overturn.

            Fairlamb made an initial court appearance in New Jersey and was ordered released, but the order was stayed pending appeal by the government, according to the Justice Department.


            Scott Fairlamb is charged with attacking cops during the assault on the U.S. Capitol. (Photo: U.S. Department of Justice)

            A criminal complaint filed against Scott Fairlamb says that a concerned citizen submitted a video that showed a man in a brown camouflage jacket pushing an officer in front of the Capitol building, and then punching the officer in the head.

            Another concerned citizen, the FBI said, submitted a video that was posted to Fairlamb’s Facebook account, which has since been deleted. In the video, the FBI said, Fairlamb “is carrying a collapsible baton and says ‘What Patriots do? We fuckin’ disarm them and then we storm fuckin’ the Capitol.’”


            Scott Fairlamb, seen in body-camera footage filmed by the officer he's accused of attacking. (Photo: FBI)

            Scott Fairlamb, as The Daily Beast reported, had previously made headlines in New Jersey for defying the state’s COVID-19 restrictions. But one associate told HuffPost that Scott Fairlamb had gotten sucked into conspiracy theories long before the coronavirus hit the United States.

            “Over the last 8-10 years, Scott got pulled more and more into the conspiracy theory vortex and pushed everything in his life aside for it. Trump’s first campaign set his targets on [Hillary Clinton] and ‘lock her up,’ then it moved to QAnon type stuff over the last few years and ultimately resulted in his participation in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot,” the acquaintance said.

            “I feel for his wife, family, employees and community, but I have zero empathy for him. He’s had too many chances over the years to correct his pattern of bullying behavior ― all while portraying himself as a ‘good guy with a Batman cape’ in his hometown,” the acquaintance said.

            Fairlamb is far from the only defendant with law enforcement connections to participate in the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol that killed Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick. Several law enforcement officials have been charged in connection with the attack on the Capitol, including two from Virginia and one from Texas. The latest law enforcement officer charged is Marissa A. Suarez, a probationary corrections officer with the Monmouth County Corrections Facility in New Jersey, who feds say sent incriminating texts about her involvement in the siege.

            “Sooo we’ve stormed Capitol Hill lol,” she wrote in one text. “We’re inside.”

            Dozens of law enforcement officers ― at least 39 officers from 17 different states ― attended the Trump rally that preceded the attack on the Capitol, according to The Appeal.
            ___________
            Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

            Comment


            • Rioters who entered Capitol building may not be charged if they didn’t engage in violence, report says


              (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images)

              Rioters who stormed the Capitol Building may not face criminal charges if they did not act violently, a report says.

              Federal law enforcement officials are reportedly debating not pressing charges against some of the pro-Trump mob to prevent hundreds of cases swamping the court system.

              No final decision has made on the non-charging of individuals who took part in the 6 January pro-Trump violence, according to the Washington Post.

              A string of participants around the US have been arrested and charged in the wake of the riot, that aimed to prevent lawmakers from certifying the election win of Joe Biden.

              Five people were killed, including a police officer, when supporters of Mr Trump’s attacked the Capitol after attending his “Stop the Steal” rally in Washington DC.

              The former president was impeached by the House for inciting the violence and now faces a trial in the Senate, which will start on 8 February.

              Federal officials believe that around 800 rioters entered the Capitol as lawmakers and vice president Mike Pence were rushed to safety.

              More than 135 people have now been charged with crimes related to the incident, with more cases expected to be filed.


              Those officials say that the behaviour of the crowd was so mixed that anyone known only to have committed unlawful entry, and not violence, vandalism or threatening actions, could not face charges, reports the Post.

              But some federal agents say that anyone involved should be fully prosecuted to send a message and discourage any similar future violence.
              ____________

              Oh HELL no. If you set one foot inside that building, then your ass needs to prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
              Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

              Comment


              • Accused Capitol Rioter Apologizes For Threat To Assassinate Rep. Ocasio-Cortez

                A Texas man facing federal charges linked to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is apologizing for taking part in the storming of the Capitol and for threatening Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and a Capitol Police officer.

                Garret Miller released a statement on Monday through his attorney claiming that he stormed the Capitol after becoming convinced by Donald Trump’s election fraud lies. The 34-year-old Miller had previously tweeted “Assassinate AOC” and threatened a Capitol Police officer who fatally shot a fellow rioter.

                “I am ashamed of my comments,” Miller’s statement read. “I was in Washington, D.C. on January 6, 2021, because I believed I was following the instructions of former President Trump and he was my president and the commander-in-chief. His statements also had me believing the election was stolen from him.”


                “Nevertheless, I fully recognize Joe Biden is now the President of the United States and that the election is over. Donald Trump is no longer president and I would not have any reason to continue to follow his lead.”

                As for his threats against the officer and the New York lawmaker, Miller said: “While I never intended to harm Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez nor harm any members of the Capitol police force, I recognize that my social media posts were completely inappropriate.”

                “I want to publicly apologize to Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez and the Capitol police officers. I have always supported law enforcement and I am ashamed by my comments,” he added.

                During an Instagram Live last week, Ocasio-Cortez said that a “close encounter” led her to fear she was “going to die” during the insurrection. It is not clear if the person she was referring to was Miller. As of Monday evening, she hadn’t commented on Miller’s apology.

                Miller was arrested last Wednesday and charged with four counts including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

                In his statement, he said he was not armed when he entered the Capitol and that he stayed in the rotunda. He claimed he went back to Texas after “President Trump asked us to go home.”

                Miller said he had never been very interested in politics until recently, but that Trump’s election fraud accusations “really got to me and I felt I had to support him.”

                However, he also said he is “solely responsible” for his actions and that “there are no excuses for what I did” before offering to testify at any trial or congressional proceeding.

                _________________

                Translation: "I'm ashamed that I got caught and now I'm terrified of the consequences of my own actions and words, so my lawyer wrote out this statement for me to deliver in the hopes of getting leniency."
                Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                Comment


                • Originally posted by TopHatter;n1571475
                  “I am ashamed of my comments,” Miller’s statement read. “I was in Washington, D.C. on January 6, 2021, because I believed I was following the instructions of former President Trump and he was my president and the commander-in-chief. His statements also had me believing the election was stolen from him.”[/B



                  Translation: "I'm ashamed that I got caught and now I'm terrified of the consequences of my own actions and words, so my lawyer wrote out this statement for me to deliver in the hopes of getting leniency."
                  I see he has also learned how to throw someone else under the bus...

                  Comment


                  • 'THIS IS ME': Rioters flaunt involvement in Capitol siege

                    WASHINGTON (AP) — These suspects weren't exactly in hiding.

                    “THIS IS ME,” one man posted on Instagram with a hand emoji pointing to himself in a picture of the violent mob descending on the U.S. Capitol. “Sooo we’ve stormed Capitol Hill lol,” one woman texted someone while inside the building. “I just wanted to incriminate myself a little lol,” another wrote on Facebook about a selfie he took inside during the Jan. 6 riot.

                    In dozens of cases, supporters of President Donald Trump downright flaunted their activity on social media on the day of the deadly insurrection. Some, apparently realizing they were in trouble with the law, deleted their accounts only to discover their friends and family members had already taken screenshots of their selfies, videos and comments and sent them to the FBI.
                    Video: Teen son speaks out after telling FBI about father involved in Capitol riots

                    YOU COULD SEE HIM, HIS BLUE
                    COAT, HIS HELMET.


                    Their total lack of concern over getting caught and their friends' willingness to turn them in has helped authorities charge about 150 people as of Monday with federal crimes. But even with the help from the rioters themselves, investigators must still work rigorously to link the images to the vandalism and suspects to the acts on Jan. 6 in order to prove their case in court. And because so few were arrested at the scene, the FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service have been forced to send agents to track suspects down.

                    “Just because you’ve left the D.C. region, you can still expect a knock on the door if we find out that you were part of criminal activity inside the Capitol,” Steven D’Antuono, the assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Washington office, said earlier this month. “Bottom line — the FBI is not sparing any resources in this investigation.”

                    In the last few weeks, the FBI has received more than 200,000 photos and video tips related to the riot. Investigators have put up billboards in several states with photos of wanted rioters. Working on tips from co-workers, acquaintances and friends, agents have tracked down driver’s license photos to match their faces with those captured on camera in the building. In some cases, authorities got records from Facebook or Twitter to connect their social media accounts to their email addresses or phone numbers. In others, agents used records from license plate readers to confirm their travels.

                    More than 800 are believed to have made their way into the Capitol, although it's likely not everyone will be tracked down and charged with a crime. Federal prosecutors are focusing on the most critical cases and the most egregious examples of wrongdoing. And they must weigh manpower, cost and evidence when charging rioters.

                    A special group of prosecutors is examining whether to bring sedition charges against the rioters, which carry up to 20 years in prison. One trio was charged with conspiracy; most have been charged with crimes like unlawful entry and disorderly conduct.

                    Many rioters posted selfies inside the Capitol to their social media accounts, gave interviews to news outlets describing their experience and readily admitted when questioned by federal investigators that they were there. One man created a Facebook album titled “Who’s House? OUR HOUSE” filled with photos of himself and others on Capitol grounds, officials said.

                    “They might have thought, like so many people that work with Trump, that if the president tells me to do it, it’s not breaking the law,” said Michael Gerhardt, an expert on impeachment and professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law.

                    Others made blunders, like a Houston police officer, who denied he went into the Capitol, then agreed to let agents look at the pictures on his phone. Inside his deleted photos folder were pictures and videos, including selfies he took inside the building, authorities said. Another man was wearing a court-ordered GPS monitor after a burglary conviction that tracked his every movement inside the building.

                    A retired firefighter from Long Island, New York, texted a video of himself in the Capitol rotunda to his girlfriend’s brother, saying he was “at the tip of the spear,” officials said. The brother happened to be a federal agent with the State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service, who turned the video over to the FBI. A lawyer for the man, Thomas Fee, said that he “was not part of any attempt to take over the U.S. Capitol” and that “the allegation is that he merely walked through an open door into the Capitol — nothing more."

                    Another man who was inside the Capitol was willing to rat out another rioter who stole House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s lectern and emailed the video to an FBI agent, even signing his own name to it. “Hello Nice FBI Lady,” he wrote, “Here are the links to the videos. Looks like Podium Guy is in one of them, less the podium. Let me know if you need anything else.”

                    In another case, a man was on a flight leaving D.C. two days after the riot when he kept shouting “Trump 2020!” and was kicked off. An airport police officer saw the man get off the plane and the man was booked on another flight. Forty-five minutes later, the officer was watching a video on Instagram and recognized the man in a group of rioters. The man, who was wearing the same shirt as the day he stormed the Capitol, was arrested at the airport, authorities said.

                    Even defense attorneys have acknowledged that the evidence poses a problem for them.

                    “I’m not a magician,” said an attorney for the man seen in a photo carrying Pelosi's lectern. “We’ve got a photograph of our client in what appears to be inside a federal building or inside the Capitol with government property."

                    Police at the Capitol planned only for a free-speech demonstration and were overwhelmed by the mob that broke through and roamed the halls of the Capitol for hours as lawmakers were sent into hiding. Five people died in the melee, including a Capitol police officer who was struck in the head with a fire extinguisher.

                    Trump was impeached after the riot on a charge of “inciting violence against the government of the United States.” Opening arguments will begin the week of Feb. 8. He is the first president to be twice impeached and the first to face a trial after leaving office.

                    Unlike criminal cases, impeachment trials do not have specific evidence rules so anything said and done that day can be used. And several of the people charged have said in interviews with reporters or federal agents that they were simply listening to the president when they marched to the Capitol.

                    ___

                    Trump supporters and Reich-wingers: Not the sharpest knives in the drawer...
                    Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                    Comment


                    • Capitol Police chief apologizes for riot 'failings,' acknowledges 'we knew that there was a strong potential for violence'

                      The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police has offered an apology to lawmakers following a deadly attack on the Capitol building, acknowledging the department "should have been more prepared."

                      Yogananda Pittman, the acting Capitol Police chief, apologized to Congress during a closed-door briefing on Tuesday for "our failings" during the riot at the Capitol that left five people dead earlier this month, The New York Times reports.

                      "On January 6th, in the face of a terrorist attack by tens of thousands of insurrectionists determined to stop the certification of Electoral College votes, the Department failed to meet its own high standards as well as yours," Pittman said, according to remarks obtained by the Times. "We fully expect to answer to you and the American people for our failings on January 6th. I am here to offer my sincerest apologies on behalf of the Department."

                      Supporters of former President Donald Trump breached the Capitol building as lawmakers met to certify President Biden's election win. Pittman told Congress that Capitol Police "should have been more prepared for this attack" and that prior to the riot, "we knew that there was a strong potential for violence and that Congress was the target."

                      "The Department prepared in order to meet these challenges, but we did not do enough," Pittman acknowledged, also praising the officers who "performed valiantly" during the attack as "heroes."

                      The apology from Pittman, who the Times notes wasn't serving as acting chief when the Capitol attack occurred, comes as CNN reports that Capitol Police officers are discussing potentially holding a no-confidence vote against department leaders who were working on the day of the pro-Trump riot. A source told CNN, "The rank-and-file of this department has no faith in any of our chiefs, especially the ones in that were here on January 6th."
                      _________

                      They knew. And did nothing.
                      Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                        They knew. And did nothing.
                        Not correct. The worst case scenario is a contigency. You plan and deploy for the most probable contigency and hope to hell that your reserves and fall back positions would be enough. Retreat in this case was not an option. By military standards, this worked. While the rioters did penetrate the lines, the penetration was contained. The police, however, did not have the resources to prevent penetration without a firefight. For that, they needed the National Guard. The police were denied.

                        Incidentally, the worst case scenario is a firefight. This did not happen.
                        Chimo

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                          Not correct. The worst case scenario is a contigency. You plan and deploy for the most probable contigency and hope to hell that your reserves and fall back positions would be enough. Retreat in this case was not an option. By military standards, this worked. While the rioters did penetrate the lines, the penetration was contained. The police, however, did not have the resources to prevent penetration without a firefight. For that, they needed the National Guard. The police were denied.

                          Incidentally, the worst case scenario is a firefight. This did not happen.
                          Sir, they said nothing about worse cases. They said they were aware there was a strong potential for violence against the lawmakers of this country.

                          Their preparations were criminally inadequate. The only physical barriers installed were there because of the impending inauguration. The number of officers on hand was laughable. "Capitol Police staffing levels mirrored that of a normal day and officers did not prepare riot control equipment." They weren't even prepared for any scenario. It was just business as usual.

                          The rioters didn't merely penetrate the lines. They rampaged throughout nearly the whole of the building at will. Let me repeat that: A large mob of violent insurrectionist broke into the US Capitol Building, the seat of the Legislative Branch of the United States of America, with very little difficulty, and did as they pleased, looting, vandalizing, even smearing feces on the walls.

                          The only thing they failed to do was kidnap and murder the politicians they were after, and only because the last line of defense held and a single officer had the courage and presence of mind to use himself as live bait to lure a group of insurrectionists away from the Senate chamber long enough for the Senators to be evacuated . Vice President Pence himself was evacuated with barely 60 seconds to spare. Even so, 5 Americans were dead when it was all over.

                          Minimizing the severity of what occurred on January 6th in that manner is absurd. It's like calling 9/11 a failure because the hijackers of Flight 93 failed to achieve their objective.
                          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            They weren't even prepared for any scenario.
                            Of course they were. They were armed. A firefight is ALWAYS a scenario the police is prepared for.

                            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            It was just business as usual.
                            I find it hard to believe riot lines are business as usual.

                            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            The rioters didn't merely penetrate the lines. They rampaged throughout nearly the whole of the building at will.
                            No, they did not. They did not go into the Lethal Force Authourized Areas.

                            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            Let me repeat that: A large mob of violent insurrectionist broke into the US Capitol Building, the seat of the Legislative Branch of the United States of America, with very little difficulty, and did as they pleased, looting, vandalizing, even smearing feces on the walls.
                            They were contained.

                            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            The only thing they failed to do was kidnap and murder the politicians they were after, and only because the last line of defense held and a single officer had the courage and presence of mind to use himself as live bait to lure a group of insurrectionists away from the Senate chamber long enough for the Senators to be evacuated . Vice President Pence himself was evacuated with barely 60 seconds to spare. Even so, 5 Americans were dead when it was all over.
                            That is EXTREMELY overblowing things. Lethal force was authorized to protect everyone. At no time was lethal force was even considered against any specific target. VP Pence was not 60 seconds away from being kidnapped. The rioters were 60 seconds away from being riddled with bullet holes. As the Chamber evacuated, they passed by Officers with weapons drawn and rioters kissing the floor. That alone tells me the Police were still several contingencies away from collapse.

                            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                            Minimizing the severity of what occurred on January 6th in that manner is absurd. It's like calling 9/11 a failure because the hijackers of Flight 93 failed to achieve their objective.
                            Neither is overblowing the threat. I went though this entire thing. At NO POINT did I see the Police on the verge of collapse. The very fact that a lot of rioters were kissing the floor tells me a lot of them were not ready for a firefight. The fact that the Police were aiming weapons at them tells me that the Police was ready for a firefight.

                            This is basic threat assesement. You identify the most probable threat and meet it. You hold a reserves for contingencies. The final contingency has been and always will be lethal force.

                            During the Cold War, it was always a contingency that my brigader would be nuked. Do we bury ourselves in anticipation of bring nuked or do we stay out and face the 16th Guards and ignore the nuke threat until incoming? Which is the primary threat? Which do we prepare for? Same thing here.

                            Chimo

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                            • What's more, there were a hell of a lot of combat veterans, including Navy SEALS and Staff Level Officers, amongst the rioters. If they truly wanted the House and Senate dead, it would have been a lot bloodier. You actually want me to believe that this group wanted to take Congressmen and Senators with nothing more than bats and knives and a plan no better than storming a fire line with such?

                              If I was to plan this, I would want at least a company if a suicide mission, a battalion if I want to get out alive.

                              None of this is to say that the Police did not screw up. Any penetration is unacceptable but talks of collapsing the Republic is EXTREMELY overblown, especially when no armed combat was involved.
                              Last edited by Officer of Engineers; 27 Jan 21,, 01:22.
                              Chimo

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                              • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                Of course they were. They were armed. A firefight is ALWAYS a scenario the police is prepared for.
                                They were armed because they were American police officers. They also had their pants on. Having their sidearms doesn't mean they made any special preparation. It means they were dressed for duty.

                                Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                I find it hard to believe riot lines are business as usual.
                                Sir, I already said that the barriers that were in place were pre-positioned for the inauguration, not for a protest on January 6th

                                Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                No, they did not. They did not go into the Lethal Force Authourized Areas.
                                What would you call the Senate Chamber?? And where was Ashli Babbit when she was killed? In a Lethal Force Un-Authourized Area?

                                Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                They were contained.
                                Containment would've been keeping every last one of them outside the building.

                                Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                                That is EXTREMELY overblowing things. Lethal force was authorized to protect everyone. At no time was lethal force was even considered against any specific target. VP Pence was not 60 seconds away from being kidnapped. The rioters were 60 seconds away from being riddled with bullet holes. As the Chamber evacuated, they passed by Officers with weapons drawn and rioters kissing the floor. That alone tells me the Police were still several contingencies away from collapse.
                                No Sir, it is not overblowing things. Not by an order of magnitude. The Vice President of the United States shouldn't have been anywhere near that crowd.

                                And yes, he WAS within 60 seconds of coming to grief:

                                Pence didn't leave the Senate floor until 2:13 p.m. and according to the Post report, video footage shows the mob arriving on a second-floor landing at 2:14 p.m., mere seconds after Pence and his family had been rushed inside an office less than 100 feet away (Secret Service agents later moved Pence to a secure room in the Capitol complex). Source

                                I repeat: The Capitol Buiding, the seat of the Legislative Branch of the United States of America was easily, hilariously so, breached by a large mob of people, most with murderous intent. And the primary security force for the building, despite advanced warning, was criminally unprepared for what came...to the point that some officers removed barriers, opened doors and posed for pictures with the rioters. If that isn't the very definition of gross negligence, boarding on outright collusion, then I'm afraid my command of the English language isn't what I thought it was.

                                Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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