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  • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    For 20 years we have been in Afghanistan...for what?

    What was our mission when we went in....to break up Al Qaeda and get Bin Laden.

    We did that over a decade a go.

    Define why we still need to be there?
    Mission creep?
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

    Comment


    • Conservative U.S. House Republicans to form 'America First' caucus


      Conservative House of Representatives Republicans plan to form an "America First" caucus to promote the policies of ex-President Donald Trump and said on Friday the group would soon release a policy platform.

      The platform promotes "a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions" and advocates for infrastructure with aesthetic value that "befits the progeny of European architecture," Punchbowl News reported on Friday.

      Republican lawmakers Marjorie Taylor Greene and Paul Gosar are involved in the caucus, Representative Louie Gohmert, who is considering joining, confirmed to reporters.

      A spokesman for first-term congresswoman Greene, Nick Dyer, dismissed the Punchbowl report as "gossip" but said in a statement that the America First platform would be "announced to the public very soon."

      Congressional caucuses provide a forum for like-minded lawmakers to pursue common legislative objectives.

      Democrats including Representative Peter Welch denounced the caucus on Twitter as "nakedly racist and disgusting."

      "This supposed caucus and its members represent a dangerous nativist perspective that hurts our country, but sadly is not surprising," Welch added. Representative Don Beyer referred to the group as the "White Supremacist Caucus" on Twitter.

      Trump introduced his America First agenda at his inauguration in 2017 and made it a repeated theme of his presidency.

      Gohmert, a Trump ally, told reporters the caucus aims "to get our own country in order, so it's sustainable."

      Congressman Matt Gaetz, who is being investigated by the Justice Department and the House Ethics panel over allegations of sexual misconduct, said he was becoming part of the caucus.

      The group would push to "end wars, stop illegal immigration & promote trade that is fair to American workers," he said.

      Gaetz has not been charged with any crimes and has repeatedly denied wrongdoing.

      Gohmert denied the America First Caucus involves race.

      "It's not returning to Anglo-Saxon tradition," the Texas Republican said. "It's not supposed to be about race at all. We're stronger, you know, diversified. But there's some things that helped make us strong."
      https://www.reuters.com/world/us/us-...ce-2021-04-16/

      Thoughts?

      Comment


      • Originally posted by statquo View Post
        Pretty typical really. And to claim that it isn't racial is a joke. One of the most prominent planks of the Trump Party is, at it's most benign, virulent nativism.
        “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
        ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

        Comment


        • "It's not returning to Anglo-Saxon tradition," the Texas Republican said. "It's not supposed to be about race at all. We're stronger, you know, diversified. But there's some things that helped make us strong."
          Yeah. Like the free labor provided by African slaves. The cheap labor provided by Chinese immigrants building the railroads, the Native Americans who ceded land for little to no compensation, the Hispanic "illegals" forming the backbone of our agricultural labor force. Things would be SO much better if those people stayed in their place, wouldn't it Matt?

          The platform promotes "a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions" and advocates for infrastructure with aesthetic value that "befits the progeny of European architecture"
          For fucks sake, what?? None of what they mention is in any remote threat of being lost, at least not like how several Native American tribes have lost aspects of their languages/cultures, or the cultural genocide that the enslaved ancestors of African-Americans went through. The thing that throws me into a blind rage about this new-age brand of white supremacy is that they seem to almost halfway acknowledge the absolute shitgrinder (imposed by a white majority) that minorities have had to navigate throughout this country's history. But instead of working with us to move past this, they go full friggin' zero-sum game and dedicate their efforts towards keeping those uppity minorities in check or they'll do the same to us as we did to them---despite hard evidence of the contrary (see post-Jim Crow US).
          "Draft beer, not people."

          Comment


          • Marjorie Taylor Greene scraps planned launch of controversial 'America First' caucus amid blowback from GOP

            Conservative Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene is scrapping the planned launch of her "America First" caucus after receiving blowback from leaders in her own party, despite confirming through a spokesperson on Friday that the caucus would launch.

            Nick Dyer, Greene's spokesperson, told CNN in an email on Saturday afternoon the Georgia Republican is not "launching anything."

            "The Congresswoman wants to make clear that she is not launching anything. This was an early planning proposal and nothing was agreed to or approved," he said in an email to CNN, referring to a flier promoting the caucus, obtained by Punchbowl News, that used inflammatory rhetoric.He added that "she didn't approve that language and has no plans to launch anything."This is a reversal from Friday, when her office said she would launch the caucus "very soon."

            "Be on the look out for the release of the America First Caucus platform when it's announced to the public very soon," Dyer said in a statement to CNN Friday.

            Greene in a series of tweets Saturday afternoon also claimed that the staff-level draft proposal of her "America First" caucus is "from an outside group that I hadn't read." She also accused the media of creating "false narratives" and focusing on race to "divide the American people with hate through identity politics."Greene suggested in her tweets she plans to move forward with advocating for former President Donald Trump's America First agenda.

            The flier promoting the new caucus calls for a "common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions" and pushes a series of conspiracy theories about election integrity.
            The flier also outlined a nativist argument warning that "mass immigration" poses a threat to "the long-term existential future of America as a unique country with a unique culture and a unique identity."
            Congressional caucuses are voluntary groups usually made up of lawmakers seeking to advance certain policy agendas. While the groups operate outside of the formal congressional legislative structure, many have found success influencing debate and amplifying their shared policy prescriptions.

            On Friday, amid news reports of the caucus, Dyer complained about the initial draft of the flier being leaked but confirmed to CNN in a statement that plans were in the works to form the group, which he said would be "announced to the public very soon."

            The reversal from her office comes a day after top House Republican Kevin McCarthy indirectly referenced the congresswoman's new caucus, tweeting, "The Republican Party is the party of Lincoln & the party of more opportunity for all Americans—not nativist dog whistles."

            And GOP conference chair Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, responded to the reporting about the new caucus from Greene in a tweet.
            "Republicans believe in equal opportunity, freedom, and justice for all. We teach our children the values of tolerance, decency and moral courage," she wrote. "Racism, nativism, and anti-Semitism are evil. History teaches we all have an obligation to confront & reject such malicious hate."

            Embattled GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida, who is under federal investigation over allegations involving sex trafficking and prostitution, tweeted Friday, "I'm proud to join @mtgreenee in the #AmericaFirst Caucus. We will end wars, stop illegal immigration & promote trade that is fair to American workers. This is just a hit piece from the America Last crowd in Big Media, Big Tech & Big Government."

            GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois said that he was "disgusted" following initial reports of the new caucus, and on Friday said that anyone who joins the caucus should have their committee assignments stripped and be expelled from Republican conference participation.

            "While we can't prevent someone from calling themselves Republican, we can loudly say they don't belong to us," he wrote on Twitter.
            ______________

            The Trump Party "leaders" probably begged her to stick with dog whistles not air horns.
            “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
            ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

            Comment


            • Originally posted by statquo View Post
              Totally racial. She probably would love to emulate Oklahoma when they became a state and wrote Jim Crow laws into their Constitution to strip blacks of their rights.

              The "a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions" and advocates for infrastructure with aesthetic value that "befits the progeny of European architecture," resembles another guy who felt his particular Angle-Saxon roots were superior to others.

              Her father must have been quite the influence.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post

                Totally racial. She probably would love to emulate Oklahoma when they became a state and wrote Jim Crow laws into their Constitution to strip blacks of their rights.

                The "a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions" and advocates for infrastructure with aesthetic value that "befits the progeny of European architecture," resembles another guy who felt his particular Angle-Saxon roots were superior to others.

                Her father must have been quite the influence.
                I shouldn't make light of this but I just got to!!! This is what comes fo mind....


                Springtime for Hitler and Germany
                Deutschland is happy and gay
                We're marching to a faster pace
                Look out! Here comes the master race

                Springtime for Hitler and Germany
                Rhineland's a fine land once more
                Springtime for Hitler and Germany
                Watch out, Europe, we're going on tour

                Springtime for Hitler and Germany
                Winter for Poland and France
                Springtime for Hitler and Germany
                Come on Germans, go into your dance.
                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                Mark Twain

                Comment


                • Trumpism lives on in new thinktank – but critics say it’s ‘just a grift’


                  The America First Policy Institute calls itself ‘non-partisan’ and a ‘non-profit’ but critics regard it as a cash cow for Trump alumni with stained reputations

                  Malcolm X, Mark Twain, Malcolm Gladwell. Lewis Carroll, Steve Jobs. Douglas Adams, Mohandas Gandhi, Rocky Balboa – all seem unlikely sources of inspiration for a definition of Trumpism.

                  Yet these are among the prominent figures quoted by members of a new thinktank dedicated to resurrecting former US president Donald Trump’s populist-nationalist agenda.

                  The America First Policy Institute (AFPI) describes itself as both “non-profit” and “non-partisan”. Critics, however, regard it as a cash cow for alumni of the Trump administration whose stained reputations make it hard to find gainful employment.

                  Despite Trump’s campaign promise to “drain the swamp”, the AFPI reportedly has a first-year budget of $20m, which it hopes to double to $40m next year, and plans to expand beyond its current headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, to locations that include a spacious office on Washington’s Capitol Hill.


                  The AFPI unveiled a website this week replete with images of the Stars and Stripes and Mount Rushmore. It profiles 35 team members with, in most cases, an inspirational quotation from a famous person.

                  The board chair, Linda McMahon, for example, a former professional wrestling executive who led Trump’s Small Business Administration, attributes a line to the actor and comedian Lucille Ball: “If you want something done, give it to a busy woman to do it.”

                  Pam Bondi, an ex-Florida attorney general who defended Trump against impeachment, quotes the French fashion designer Coco Chanel: “Keep your heels, head and standards high.” Kaelan Dorr, who was senior adviser at the treasury department, dips into film fiction with the boxer Rocky, played by Sylvester Stallone: “Every champion was once a contender who refused to give up.”

                  But vice-chair Larry Kudlow, former economic adviser to Trump, simply quotes himself: “Free market capitalism is the best path to prosperity.”

                  Trump this week gave the organization his blessing, issuing a statement in praise of its “patriots” as “some of the greatest champions for freedom, free enterprise, national greatness, and the primacy of American workers, families, and communities, that our Nation has ever seen”.

                  The former president said these “freedom warriors” have his full support “as they work not only to preserve the historic accomplishments of my Administration, but also to propel the America First Agenda into the future”.

                  The team includes Rick Perry, former energy secretary, and John Ratcliffe, ex-director of national intelligence. Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, will be informal advisers to the group, according to the Axios website.


                  The AFPI’s president and chief executive is Brooke Rollins, whose past roles have included policy director for Perry when he was governor of Texas, head of the Texas Public Policy Foundation (TPPF) thinktank and Trump’s top domestic policy adviser.

                  With priorities including criminal justice reform, government efficiency and education reform, Rollins oversaw a significant expansion and enhanced profile of the TPPF during her 15 years there, a formula she hopes to replicate at the new thinktank. Her successor as chief executive of the TPPF, Kevin Roberts, said: “She loves ideas. She loves policy.

                  “She wants to be able to continue to promote the great successes that came from the Trump administration, many of them originating in states; that really makes sense when you think about what she was doing before she went to the White House. I think she’s going to be a forceful and classy voice of objection to some of the priorities of the Biden administration. She’s going to do an exceptional job in leading the group.”

                  Roberts believes that Trump’s policy achievements on criminal justice reform, the US-Mexico border and the pre-pandemic economy are worth preserving, studying and developing. “I think bottling that up into a thinktank and asking questions from an academic point of view – how was it that we achieved that? – is really important,” he said.

                  The AFPI is organized around 20 “policy centers”, such as homeland security and energy independence. A profile of the “Center for 1776” rails against “academic elites and demagogues” who are choosing to “embrace identity politics, division, and submission”. It appears to be picking up where Trump’s “1776 Commission”, a thinly disguised rightwing backlash against the New York Times’s 1619 Project, left off.

                  But some observers found irony in the notion that a president who exhibited few ideological commitments – other than “owning the libs” and Republican orthodoxy on tax cuts for the rich – is now spawning a policy institute.

                  Michael D’Antonio, an author and political commentator on CNN, said: “I guess I give them credit for exhibiting creativity. I didn’t expect that the level of gall would reach the point where they would actually create an institute devoted to policies that never existed in the first place.

                  https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...licy-institute
                  More of the article in the link, it was pretty long.

                  Trump University 2.0?

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by statquo View Post

                    More of the article in the link, it was pretty long.

                    Trump University 2.0?
                    Trumpism lives on in new thinktank – but critics say it’s ‘just a grift’

                    Critics, however, regard it as a cash cow for alumni of the Trump administration whose stained reputations make it hard to find gainful employment.


                    Pretty much all you need to know right there. Although instead of saying it's "just a grift", it would be more accurate to say "it's yet another grift".
                    “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                    ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                    Comment


                    • With Trump its either about his ego or the grift. Bet on it every time.
                      sigpic

                      Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
                        With Trump its either about his ego or the grift. Bet on it every time.
                        The former is what I wonder about when it comes to 2024. Early Republican front runners like DeSantis or Haley, people who could actually win, or whoever are the front runners in a couple years... is Trump's fragile ego going to let them run or is he going to sewer their campaigns in the tabloid battles because he wants to run again? It's a dumb question because we all know the answer, but it's almost hilariously predictable and self defeating to Republicans.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by statquo View Post

                          The former is what I wonder about when it comes to 2024. Early Republican front runners like DeSantis or Haley, people who could actually win, or whoever are the front runners in a couple years... is Trump's fragile ego going to let them run or is he going to sewer their campaigns in the tabloid battles because he wants to run again? It's a dumb question because we all know the answer, but it's almost hilariously predictable and self defeating to Republicans.
                          Well said. The biggest obstacle to the GOP re-taking the White House is Donald Trump. Whoever winds up on the GOP ticket needs to start laying their groundwork and game plan right now. Which they absolutely cannot do.
                          “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                          ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                          Comment


                          • it was pretty funny to watch Nikki Haley going from "Trump led an insurrection and we made a terrible mistake following him!" to "If Donald Trump runs, I will support him and not run against him" in the space of several months.
                            There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by astralis View Post
                              it was pretty funny to watch Nikki Haley going from "Trump led an insurrection and we made a terrible mistake following him!" to "If Donald Trump runs, I will support him and not run against him" in the space of several months.
                              You can't survive politically on the Right if you go against Donald Trump, plain and simple. It's only the retired pols that are willing to speak the truth about him.
                              “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                              ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                              Comment


                              • geezus christ.

                                G.O.P. Anti-Protester Bills Include Immunity for Hitting Them With Cars

                                https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/21/u...test-laws.html


                                By Reid J. Epstein and Patricia Mazzei

                                April 21, 2021

                                Republican legislators in Oklahoma and Iowa have passed bills granting immunity to drivers whose vehicles strike and injure protesters in public streets.

                                A Republican proposal in Indiana would bar anyone convicted of unlawful assembly from holding state employment, including elected office. A Minnesota bill would prohibit those convicted of unlawful protesting from receiving student loans, unemployment benefits or housing assistance.

                                And in Florida, Gov. Ron DeSantis signed sweeping legislation this week that toughened existing laws governing public disorder and created a harsh new level of infractions — a bill he’s called “the strongest anti-looting, anti-rioting, pro-law-enforcement piece of legislation in the country.”

                                The measures are part of a wave of new anti-protest legislation, sponsored and supported by Republicans, in the 11 months since Black Lives Matter protests swept the country following the death of George Floyd. The Minneapolis police officer who killed Mr. Floyd, Derek Chauvin, was convicted on Tuesday on murder and manslaughter charges, a cathartic end to weeks of tension.

                                But while Democrats seized on Mr. Floyd’s death last May to highlight racism in policing and other forms of social injustice, Republicans responded to a summer of protests by proposing a raft of punitive new measures governing the right to lawfully assemble. G.O.P. lawmakers in 34 states have introduced 81 anti-protest bills during the 2021 legislative session — more than twice as many proposals as in any other year, according to Elly Page, a senior legal adviser at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, which tracks legislation limiting the right to protest.

                                Some, like Mr. DeSantis, are labeling them “anti-riot” bills, conflating the right to peaceful protest with the rioting and looting that sometimes resulted from such protests.

                                The laws carry forward the hyperbolic message Republicans have been pushing in the 11 months since Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice swept the country: that Democrats are tolerant of violent and criminal actions from those who protest against racial injustice. And the legislation underscores the extent to which support for law enforcement personnel and opposition to protests have become part of the bedrock of G.O.P. orthodoxy and a likely pillar of the platform the party will take into next year’s midterms.

                                “This is consistent with the general trend of legislators’ responding to powerful and persuasive protests by seeking to silence them rather than engaging with the message of the protests,” said Vera Eidelman, a lawyer at the American Civil Liberties Union. “If anything, the lesson from the last year, and decades, is not that we need to give more tools to police and prosecutors, it’s that they abuse the tools they already have.”

                                Laws already exist to punish rioting, and civil rights advocates worry that the new bills violate rights of lawful assembly and free speech protected under the First Amendment. The overwhelming majority of last summer’s nationwide Black Lives Matter protests were peaceful — more than 96 percent involved no property damage or police injuries, according to The Washington Post, which also found that police officers or counterprotesters often instigated violence.

                                Most of the protests held across Florida last summer were also peaceful, though a few in Miami, Tampa and Jacksonville produced some episodes of violence, including the burning of a police car and a sporting goods store. Still, as they embraced the bill that Mr. DeSantis signed into law, Republican leaders expressed scorn for cities that trim police budgets and tolerate protesters who disrupt business and traffic.

                                “We weren’t going to allow Florida to become Seattle,” said Chris Sprowls, a Republican who is the speaker of the Florida House, mentioning cities where protests lasted for months last year and demonstrators frequently clashed with the police. “We were not going to allow Florida to become Portland.”

                                The Florida law imposes harsher penalties for existing public disorder crimes, turning misdemeanor offenses into felonies, creating new felony offenses and preventing defendants from being released on bail until they have appeared before a judge. A survey conducted in January by Ryan D. Tyson, a Republican pollster, found broad support in the state for harsher penalties against protesters “who damage personal and business property or assault law enforcement.”


                                But the law goes farther. If a local government chooses to decrease its law enforcement budget — to “defund the police,” as Mr. DeSantis put it — the measure provides a new mechanism for a prosecutor or a city or county commissioner to appeal the reduction to the state.

                                The law also increases penalties for taking down monuments, including Confederate ones, making the offense a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. It makes it easier for anyone who injures a protester, such as by driving into a crowd, to escape civil liability.

                                State Senator Shevrin D. Jones, a Democrat from Broward County and a vocal critic of the law, noted that Mr. DeSantis had been quick to emphasize how necessary the bill was the day after the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol but had made no mention of that event during Monday’s bill signing, focusing solely on the summer protests.

                                That was evidence, he said, that bills aimed at punishing protesters were disproportionately targeting people of color. “This bill is racist at its core,” Mr. Jones said.

                                So far, three bills aimed at limiting protests have been signed into law — Florida’s and new laws in Arkansas and Kansas that target protesters who seek to disrupt oil pipelines. Others are likely to come soon.

                                In Oklahoma, Republican lawmakers last week sent legislation to Gov. Kevin Stitt that would criminalize the unlawful blocking of a public street and grant immunity to drivers who strike and injure protesters during a riot. Last June, a pickup truck carrying a horse trailer drove through a crowd of Black Lives Matter protesters on a Tulsa freeway, injuring several people and leaving one paralyzed. The driver, who said he had sped up because he feared for the safety of his family, was not charged.

                                The bill’s author, State Senator Rob Standridge, said the Tulsa incident had prompted him to seek immunity for drivers who strike protesters. He said Tuesday he wasn’t aware of any drivers who had been charged after striking protesters in Oklahoma. “My hope is that this law never is utilized,” he said in an interview. Carly Atchison, a spokeswoman for Mr. Stitt, declined to say whether he would sign the bill, which passed with veto-proof majorities.

                                Tiffany Crutcher, whose twin brother, Terence Crutcher, was shot and killed in 2016 by a Tulsa police officer who was later acquitted on a manslaughter charge, said the Oklahoma proposal represents Republican efforts to extend the Trump administration’s hostility toward people of color.

                                Dr. Crutcher said she was convinced that if Mr. Stitt signed the legislation, it would be applied in harsher terms against those protesting racial injustice than for white protesters demonstrating for gun rights or against abortion.

                                “We all know that over the last four years that we saw white supremacy, bigotry and racism show its ugly head in so many forms,” said Dr. Crutcher, who quit her job as a physical therapist to work for racial justice after the death of her brother. “This is the continuation of the Trump administration that showed us every day that Black lives didn’t matter.”

                                While Republican lawmakers present the anti-protest legislation as support for the police, law enforcement agencies don’t necessarily back the new proposals.

                                The Iowa bills, part of a law enforcement package proposed by Gov. Kim Reynolds, would strip local governments of state funding if cities and counties defund their own law enforcement budgets — something that no Iowa jurisdiction has sought to do. And state lawmakers cut a proposal by Ms. Reynolds to track police-stop data by race.

                                The state’s police departments didn’t ask for new tools to crack down on protesters or grant immunity to drivers who strike protesters marching in streets, said Kellie Paschke, a lobbyist for the Iowa Peace Officers Association, an umbrella group for the police.

                                In Kentucky, where protests following the police killing of Breonna Taylor lasted for months last year, the State Senate passed a bill that would make it a crime to insult or taunt a police officer with “offensive or derisive” words or gestures that would have “a direct tendency to provoke a violent response.” The measure would have required that those arrested on such a charge be held in jail for at least 48 hours — a provision that does not automatically apply to those arrested on murder, rape or arson charges in Kentucky.

                                Though the legislation died in the statehouse over bipartisan concerns about free speech, the bill’s lead sponsor, State Senator Danny Carroll, a Republican who is a retired police officer, said he planned to refile it next session. Mr. Carroll said the bill was needed to ensure community safety and protect law enforcement personnel.

                                “They are under attack constantly,” he said, noting that police officers decades ago could “arrest someone for cussing them out,” until court rulings curtailed such police powers.

                                In the hours after Mr. DeSantis signed the Florida bill on Monday, as the nation awaited the Chauvin verdict, progressive community organizers in the state worried about how law enforcement agencies might react to any protests that resulted from the decision. Moné Holder, senior director of advocacy and programs for Florida Rising, a social justice organization, said her team had spent a lot of time informing activists of their rights under their new law.

                                “It’s a tactic to silence our voices,” she said.

                                After the verdict was announced, she remained concerned about how the police would deal with community members if they chose to gather outside, to be together after an emotional year.

                                “To console each other, to cry, to grieve,” she said. “The fact that we have to think twice about that is troublesome.”
                                There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

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