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  • #31
    Biden chooses a former executive of Delaware chemical giant DuPont to be on EPA transition team.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...rin-brockovich

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    • #32
      Originally posted by surfgun View Post
      Biden chooses a former executive of Delaware chemical giant DuPont to be on EPA transition team.
      https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...rin-brockovich
      How's that lefty - socialist label working out for you ?
      Trust me?
      I'm an economist!

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by DOR View Post

        How's that lefty - socialist label working out for you ?
        The key is Delaware favoritism - payback. It is just more politricks.
        Last edited by surfgun; 21 Nov 20,, 16:05.

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        • #34
          Summers: Constricting Fed's Ability to Act is 'Height of Foolishness'



          Bloomberg Markets and Finance
          20 November 2020

          Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers, a Wall Street Week contributor and adviser to President-elect Joe Biden's campaign, says that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin's decision to ask the Federal Reserve to return funds is reckless because it restricts the Fed from acting at a time when fiscal stimulus is uncertain. He joins David Westin on "Bloomberg Wall Street Week."
          .
          .
          .

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          • #35
            Originally posted by surfgun View Post

            The key is Delaware favoritism - payback. It is just more politricks.
            So, anyone and everyone from Delaware is a political payback.
            Right.
            Got it.

            Keep taking the meds.
            Trust me?
            I'm an economist!

            Comment


            • #36
              DOR, you don’t know Jack about Delaware politics.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by surfgun View Post
                DOR, you don’t know Jack about Delaware politics.
                And, you don't know anything about just about every subject on which you opine.
                Trust me?
                I'm an economist!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by DOR View Post

                  And, you don't know anything about just about every subject on which you opine.
                  The thought is mutual.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Biden's National Security team is starting to shape up...



                    [Biden Will Nominate First Woman to Lead Intelligence, First Latino to Run Homeland Security


                    John Kerry, the former secretary of state, will be climate czar, according to the Biden transition team.

                    Avril Haines, a former deputy C.I.A. director and deputy national security adviser, would be the highest-ranking woman to serve in the intelligence community. Credit...Stefani Reynolds/Alamy

                    By Michael Crowley
                    • Nov. 23, 2020Updated 1:20 p.m. ET
                    WASHINGTON — President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. plans to name several top national security picks on Tuesday, his transition office said, including the first Latino to lead the Department of Homeland Security, the first woman to head the intelligence community and a former secretary of state, John Kerry, to be his international climate czar.

                    At an event in Wilmington, Del., Mr. Biden will announce plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to be his secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, his transition office said, and Avril Haines to be his director of national intelligence. He intends to name Mr. Kerry as a special presidential envoy on climate. The transition office also confirmed reports on Sunday night that Mr. Biden will nominate Antony J. Blinken to be secretary of state and Jake Sullivan as national security adviser.

                    Mr. Biden will also nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be ambassador to the United Nations and restore the job to cabinet-level status, giving Ms. Thomas-Greenfield, an African-American woman, a seat on his National Security Council.

                    Mr. Kerry’s job does not require Senate confirmation. A statement released by the transition office said Mr. Kerry “will fight climate change full-time as Special Presidential Envoy for Climate and will sit on the National Security Council.”

                    To manage his domestic climate policies, Mr. Biden also will soon name a White House climate director, who will have equal standing with Mr. Kerry, according to transition officials.

                    The emerging team reunites a group of former senior officials from the Obama administration, most of whom worked closely together at the State Department and the White House and in several cases have close ties to Mr. Biden dating back years. They are well known to foreign diplomats around the world and share a belief in the core principles of the Democratic foreign policy establishment — international cooperation, strong U.S. alliances and leadership but a wariness of foreign interventions after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

                    The racial and gender mix also reflects Mr. Biden’s stated commitment to diversity, which has lagged behind notoriously in the worlds of foreign policy and national security, where white men are disproportionately represented.

                    The slate of picks also showed Mr. Biden’s determination to push forward with setting up his administration despite President Trump’s continuing refusal to concede or assist him, even as a small but growing number of Republicans lawmakers and supporters of the president are calling for a formal transition to begin.
                    If confirmed, Mr. Mayorkas, who served as deputy Homeland Security secretary from 2013 to 2016, would be the first Latino to run the department charged with implementing and managing the nation’s immigration policies.

                    A Cuban-born immigrant whose family fled the Castro revolution, he is a former U.S. attorney in California and began Mr. Obama’s first term as director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. He will have to restore trust in the department after many key Democratic constituencies came to see it as the vessel for some of Mr. Trump’s most contentious policies, such as separating migrant children from their families and building a wall along the southern border.

                    Top immigration officials in the Obama administration recommended Mr. Mayorkas’s nomination as a way to build support with the immigrant community while satisfying moderates and career officials within the agency who are looking for a leader with a background in law enforcement.

                    Ms. Haines served as deputy director of the C.I.A. in the Obama administration before succeeding Mr. Blinken as Mr. Obama’s deputy national security adviser. She, too, is a former aide to Mr. Biden, serving as deputy chief counsel to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 2007 to 2008 while Mr. Biden was chairman. Ms. Haines also served as counsel to Mr. Obama’s National Security Council, helping him navigate legal issues around counterterrorism operations and pressing for more restraint to reduce civilian casualties.

                    If confirmed, Ms. Haines will be the highest-ranking woman to serve in the intelligence community. The director of the C.I.A., now led by its first female director in Gina Haspel, reports to the director of national intelligence.

                    Ms. Thomas-Greenfield is a 35-year Foreign Service veteran who has served in diplomatic posts around the world. She served from 2013 to 2017 as assistant secretary of state for African affairs. Just as important in the view of Biden officials is her time as a former director general and human resources director of the Foreign Service; they see it as positioning her to help restore morale at a State Department where many career officials felt ignored and even undermined during the Trump years.

                    Ms. Thomas-Greenfield, who recently recounted joining a “still very male and very pale” foreign service decades ago, has also served as the U.S. ambassador to Liberia and has been posted in Switzerland, Pakistan, Kenya, Gambia, Nigeria and Jamaica.

                    Perhaps the biggest surprise was Mr. Biden’s decision to bring back Mr. Kerry in a new role that would signal the new administration’s commitment to fighting climate change. Mr. Kerry, 76, is a former, longtime Senate colleague and friend who campaigned for Mr. Biden through some of his candidacy’s darkest days and, Democrats say, retains his voracious appetite for international affairs. Since serving as Mr. Obama’s second secretary of state from 2013 to 2017, Mr. Kerry elevated his longtime interest in climate to his signature issue and currently runs an organization dedicated to the topic. His will be a full-time position.

                    “We have no time to lose when it comes to our national security and foreign policy,” Mr. Biden said in a statement provided by his transition office. “I need a team ready on Day 1 to help me reclaim America’s seat at the head of the table, rally the world to meet the biggest challenges we face, and advance our security, prosperity, and values. This is the crux of that team.”

                    “These individuals are equally as experienced and crisis-tested as they are innovative and imaginative” he added. “Their accomplishments in diplomacy are unmatched, but they also reflect the idea that we cannot meet the profound challenges of this new moment with old thinking and unchanged habits — or without diversity of background and perspective. It’s why I’ve selected them.”


                    In Mr. Blinken, 58, Mr. Biden chose a confidant of more than 20 years who served as his top aide on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee before joining his vice-presidential staff, where he served as Mr. Biden’s national security adviser, then principal deputy national security adviser to Mr. Obama and then deputy secretary of state from 2015 to 2017.

                    Mr. Blinken is widely viewed as a pragmatic centrist on foreign policy who, like Mr. Biden, has supported past American interventions and believes the United States must play a central leadership role in the world. Mr. Biden likely calculated that the soft-spoken Mr. Blinken, who is well regarded by many Republicans, will face a less difficult Senate confirmation fight than another top contender, the former national security adviser Susan E. Rice.

                    Mr. Blinken began his career at the State Department during the Clinton administration. He spent much of his youth in Paris and attended high school there, and is a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law School.

                    Mr. Sullivan will take the White House’s top national security job, and at 44 when he takes office, will be the youngest person to hold that position after McGeorge Bundy, who took over the job at age 41 under President John F. Kennedy.

                    Long viewed as one of his party’s brightest upcoming talents, Mr. Sullivan followed Mr. Blinken as Mr. Biden’s top national security aide and then ascended to become a senior aide to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who has called him a “once-in-a-generation talent.” Along the way, Mr. Sullivan found admirers even among conservative Republicans in Congress while playing a key role in the negotiations leading to the 2015 Iran nuclear deal.

                    A Minnesota native and Yale Law School graduate, Mr. Sullivan in recent months has helped spearhead a project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace re-conceiving U.S. foreign policy around the needs of the American middle class.
                    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                    Mark Twain

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                    • #40
                      Sounds like a group of experienced and quality people. You know I reminisce about experience and quality nowadays.

                      Comment


                      • #41



                        Dr. Janet Yellen is Joe Biden's pick for Treasury Secretary, and it is an excellent one. The former Federal Reserve Chair (2014-18) and Governor (2004-14) also served as President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers Chair (1997-99). If the Senate does its constitutional duty for a change, she will be the first female Treasury Secretary of the United States.

                        During her 2010 Senate confirmation hearings (to be Fed Vice Chair), Sen. Richard Shelby (who has no economics background) voted against her because he thought she had “an inflationary bias.” That same year, she received the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics. Five years later, with Dr Yellen in the Chair, the Fed raised interest rates for the first time in nearly a decade. During her tenure, unemployment improved by the largest margin since 1948, and the S&P 500 rose in real terms faster than under her four predecessors.

                        Oh, and the dinner table conversation must be fascinating: her husband, George Akerlof (who, like Dr Yellen, is also a professor at Berkeley), won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2001. The two of them also are the first married couple to both have received honorary doctorates from the London School of Economics.

                        Trust me?
                        I'm an economist!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          In latest blow to Trump, GSA administrator releases transition funds to Biden

                          Emily Murphy, the top official in General Services Administration in charge of making millions of dollars in transition funding available to the winner of the presidential election, said Monday that President-elect Joe Biden would receive those funds.

                          “As the Administrator of the U.S. General Services Administration, I have the ability under the Presidential Transition Act of 1963, as amended, to make certain post-election resources and services available to assist in the event of a presidential transition,” Murphy said in a letter sent Monday to Biden. “I take this role seriously and, because of recent developments involving legal challenges and certifications of election results, am transmitting this letter today to make those resources and services available to you.”

                          Murphy, who is tasked with ascertaining the winner of the presidential election, had come under fire from Democrats who accused her of blocking the transition funds out of loyalty to President Trump. Murphy denied those accusations in her letter to Biden.

                          “Contrary to media reports and insinuations, my decision was not made out of fear or favoritism. Instead, I strongly believe that the statue requires that the GSA Administrator ascertain, not impose, the apparent president-elect,” Murphy wrote.

                          A statement by the Biden campaign welcomed the news.

                          “The GSA Administrator has ascertained President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris are the apparent winner of the election, providing the incoming Administration with the resources and support necessary to carry out a smooth and peaceful transfer of power,” Yohannes Abraham, executive director of the Biden-Harris transition team, said in a statement.

                          Trump has pursued a legal strategy to try to overturn the will of the voters in key battleground states where Biden was declared the winner, including Arizona, Nevada, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Georgia. None of those challenges have so far shown signs of possibly overturning the results of the election.

                          Murphy said in her letter that she was freeing up $7,300,000 to the Biden campaign to aid in the transition.

                          On Monday, Michigan joined Georgia in certifying that Biden had won the election, and Pennsylvania is expected to follow soon, pushing him over the 270 electoral vote threshold and further sealing Trump’s defeat.

                          Biden announced several picks for cabinet positions on Monday. Trump, meanwhile, thanked Murphy and vowed he would yet be reelected.

                          “I want to thank Emily Murphy at GSA for her steadfast dedication and loyalty to our Country. She has been harassed, threatened, and abused – and I do not want to see this happen to her, her family, or employees of GSA,” Trump tweeted. “Our case STRONGLY continues, we will keep up the good fight, and I believe we will prevail! Nevertheless, in the best interest of our Country, I am recommending that Emily and her team do what needs to be done with regard to initial protocols, and have told my team to do the same.”
                          ______________

                          And the transition grinds on....

                          Naturally her letter was addressed to "Mr. Biden" rather than "President-Elect".
                          Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by DOR View Post


                            Dr. Janet Yellen is Joe Biden's pick for Treasury Secretary, and it is an excellent one. The former Federal Reserve Chair (2014-18) and Governor (2004-14) also served as President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers Chair (1997-99). If the Senate does its constitutional duty for a change, she will be the first female Treasury Secretary of the United States.

                            During her 2010 Senate confirmation hearings (to be Fed Vice Chair), Sen. Richard Shelby (who has no economics background) voted against her because he thought she had “an inflationary bias.” That same year, she received the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics. Five years later, with Dr Yellen in the Chair, the Fed raised interest rates for the first time in nearly a decade. During her tenure, unemployment improved by the largest margin since 1948, and the S&P 500 rose in real terms faster than under her four predecessors.

                            Oh, and the dinner table conversation must be fascinating: her husband, George Akerlof (who, like Dr Yellen, is also a professor at Berkeley), won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2001. The two of them also are the first married couple to both have received honorary doctorates from the London School of Economics.
                            UC Berkeley once again...:)

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post

                              UC Berkeley once again...:)
                              Bo Gears!
                              Trust me?
                              I'm an economist!

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Biden says outreach from Trump admin has been 'sincere' as transition begins

                                President-elect Joe Biden said Tuesday that the Trump administration has already begun to reach out to his transition team, and he described the effort as "sincere," a day after a federal agency released a letter to formally begin the transition of power.

                                "Immediately, we've gotten outreach from the national security shop to just across the board," Biden said in an exclusive interview with NBC News’ Lester Holt. "And they're already working out my ability to get presidential daily briefs, we're already working out meeting with the Covid team in the White House and how to not only distribute but get from a vaccine being distributed to a person able to get vaccinated, so I think we're gonna not be so far behind the curve as we thought might be in the past."

                                He added, "And I must say the outreach has been sincere — it has not been begrudging so far and I don't expect it to be."


                                Biden, who said he has not spoken directly with Trump since the race was called, also said his administration will not be “a third Obama term” because the world has changed so much during the Trump years.

                                "This is not a third Obama term because ... we face a totally different world than we faced in the Obama/Biden administration," he said. "President Trump has changed the landscape. It's become America first, it's been America alone."

                                President Donald Trump has refused to acknowledge that he lost the race, and Biden's comments came as his legal team continued its sputtering legal battle to overturn the election — a strategy that took a blow this week as states have begun to certify their election results. After Michigan certified its results on Monday, the head of the General Services Administration informed Biden that the official governmental transition process has been approved following weeks of delay.

                                GSA Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter that Biden, whom she referred to as "the apparent president-elect," is now able to get access to millions of dollars in federal funds and other resources to begin his transition to power. In her letter, Murphy also denied that she had been under pressure from the White House to delay the process.

                                Hours later, the president tweeted on Monday that he would “never concede to fake ballots and ‘Dominion,'” referring to a conspiracy theory that baselessly alleges a company that makes voting machines deleted millions of Trump votes.

                                The refusal stopped Biden's team from gaining critical access to government resources as the nation grapples with rising Covid-19 case numbers and economic uncertainty. However, Biden has begun filling out his Cabinet and announcing personnel for other senior roles during the delay. He also held briefings with former top government officials and formed his own Covid-19 task force.

                                Trump and the GSA faced increasing pressure as a growing number of Republican lawmakers began to publicly call for Biden to be granted access, citing national security concerns. Democratic lawmakers had also begun calling for Murphy to testify before Congress.

                                The president-elect said in his interview that during his first 100 days in office he wants to get immigration reform and Covid-19 relief through Congress.

                                "I will send an immigration bill to the United States Senate with a pathway to citizenship for over 11 million undocumented people in America," he said. "I will also be moving to do away with some of the, I think, very damaging executive orders that have significantly impacted on making the climate worse and making us less healthy from methane to a whole range of things the president has done."

                                Biden also shut down speculation that he would investigate Trump once he is in office.

                                "I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happened," he said. "What I'm focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it."

                                ____________

                                Biden won't direct his AG to investigate Trump...but any AG worthy of the name will do so. The pervasive in-your-face corruption and criminality of the Trump Administration cannot go unanswered.

                                Imagine, we're about to go back to a functioning Executive Branch, headed up by a President actually wanted the job and won't make "Milking The Job For All It's Worth" his only priority, staffed by competent and experienced people whose primary qualification isn't "Blind Loyalty To The Leader", and whose counsel and advise will be listened to.

                                No wonder Trump's followers don't want Biden in office.
                                Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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