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  • The Biden-Harris Transition Thread

    Biden may have trouble unearthing Trump’s national security secrets
    From tearing up documents and hiding transcripts of calls with foreign leaders to using encrypted messaging apps and personal email accounts for government business, the Trump White House’s skirting of records preservation rules could limit the incoming Biden administration’s visibility into highly sensitive foreign policy and national security secrets.

    The mysteries have swirled over the past four years: What was really said during Trump’s many phone calls and one-on-one meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin? What has Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kusher discussed with Saudi Arabia’s Prince Mohammed bin Salman on WhatsApp, where messages can be automatically deleted? Did Trump’s aides memorialize any of the reported conversations he had with U.S. and foreign officials about boosting his business empire?

    The Presidential Records Act, which requires a sitting president to preserve and ultimately make public all records relating to the performance of their official duties, was passed 42 years ago in response to President Richard Nixon’s attempts to hide the White House tapes that led to his downfall. The law makes presidential records available to the public via the Freedom of Information Act beginning five years after the end of an administration.

    But it has no real enforcement mechanism and relies on the president’s good faith compliance, said Kel McClanahan, the executive director of the law firm National Security Counselors.

    “Out of respect for the institution and the separation of powers, when Congress passed the PRA, they gave the White House the right to decide what constitutes a presidential record,” McClanahan said. “They never envisioned a president who would come in and just start shredding stuff.”

    There are some guidelines: The National Archives defines presidential records as any documentary materials “created or received” by the president, their immediate staff, or anyone in the Executive Office of the President “whose function is to advise or assist the President” in the course of carrying out official duties. But it is not clear how much has been preserved given Trump’s habit of ripping up documents — the employees once tasked with taping them back together were summarily fired in 2018 — and the White House’s general paranoia about leaks.

    “The White House’s strategy seems to be that you can’t make a record public if it doesn't exist in the first place,” said Jordan Libowitz, communications director at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. “And that’s a scary way to govern.”

    Asked about their compliance with records laws, a White House official said, “We preserve everything we have to preserve.” Pressed on whether anything had been deleted from the National Security Council’s code word classified system — where some transcripts of Trump’s calls with foreign leaders have been hidden — the official replied: “I’m not going to talk about any of that. But we comply with everything. Like, we’re really actually not criminals.”

    Several pro-transparency groups are not convinced the law is being followed. In a letter to the National Archives and Records Administration last month, a dozen such organizations including CREW, the Project On Government Oversight, and the Government Accountability Project urged NARA to detail the steps it’s been taking to ensure that the Trump White House “is taking all necessary steps to preserve a complete and accurate historical record of the current administration.” NARA did not reply to the letter, and did not return a request for comment from POLITICO.

    Libowitz pointed to Trump’s meetings with Putin, which were often done either without a note taker or an American translator present. Kushner’s meetings with the Saudis and other foreign government officials, moreover, often excluded senior State Department officials, according to former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Additionally, White House cybersecurity operations were folded last year into an office not covered by the Presidential Records Act, according to an October 2019 memo written by Dimitrios Vastakis, who was the branch chief of the White House computer network defense.

    “Considering the level of network access and privileged capabilities that cybersecurity staff had,” Vastakis wrote, “it is highly concerning that the entire cybersecurity apparatus is being handed over to non-PRA entities.”

    Trump is also notoriously hostile to note takers. Former White House counsel Don McGahn told special counsel Robert Mueller in an interview that Trump once asked him: “Why do you take notes? Lawyers don’t take notes.” Trump also confiscated notes taken by an interpreter during one of his first meetings with Putin in 2017. And Trump’s daughter and senior adviser Ivanka Trump reportedly sent hundreds of emails to White House aides and Cabinet officials using a personal account.

    Among the most compelling presidential records of Trump’s tenure are the letters he has written to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which have never been made public. But it’s unclear whether copies of the letters were made and then preserved by the White House. When asked about the letters, the White House official said he did not know but added that generally, leader-to-leader correspondences are saved.

    “Like many other laws, the Presidential Records Act and the Federal Records Act presume a degree of good faith on the part of public officials,” said Steven Aftergood, who runs the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy. “The National Archives does not have its own ‘police’ who can swoop in and enforce the preservation of sensitive records. As a practical matter, it is not too difficult for a wayward official to destroy records or to secrete them out of official custody.”

    A former Obama NSC official put it succinctly: “I know that there are pretty strict rules in place, but of course who knows if this White House has or will follow them.”

    There are some automatic safeguards in place: “For example, unless the system has been disabled, almost every email and NSC document is automatically saved as a record,” the former NSC official said. “The default presumption is that it should be preserved; in fact, you had to make the case why it shouldn’t be preserved. Also, many agencies keep records of NSC papers sent out for Deputies/Principals meetings, so I think that destroying all the copies of something would be really, really hard.”

    One lingering question is whether President-elect Joe Biden, as he attempts to repair the United States’ relationships with allies Trump has alienated, will be able to review transcripts of Trump’s past calls with foreign leaders.

    After 2017, when verbatim transcripts of Trump’s conversations with the leaders of Australia and Mexico were leaked to the press, the White House began placing the transcripts into the NSC’s code word system — a server designed to protect highly sensitive compartmented intelligence matters that is managed directly by the NSC’s Directorate for Intelligence Programs.

    That is where NSC lawyers put Trump’s ill-fated July 2019 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which ultimately got Trump impeached.

    Experts said it was likely that those kinds of documents, if they weren’t deleted from the system, would be among the presidential records sent to NARA for preservation and not readily available to the Biden White House. Even if records have been preserved properly, or if officials at other agencies took notes or made memos of particular correspondences, there are still limits on what Biden will be able to access, said one lawyer who served in the Obama White House counsel’s office.

    “Under the Presidential Records Act, the current administration does not have carte blanche access to the records of prior administrations,” he said, pointing to the relevant statute that governs a president’s access to his predecessor’s records.

    “It’s not just an open book,” the lawyer added. “So it’s not like a Biden White House would just be able to peruse the Trump library. Normally, an incumbent White House would have to make a request to NARA to locate a particular record, and NARA would then need to consult with a representative of the relevant former president before providing it to the current White House.

    But that is rare, and is usually done only when there is some novel issue that presents itself and the current administration is curious about how its predecessor handled it.”

    In other words: Trump’s critics shouldn’t necessarily expect a full accounting — at least not anytime soon — of the many mysteries and secrets of the Trump presidency.

    “Aside from questions of good faith and compliance, there are also logistical uncertainties arising from the large volume of records that are subject to preservation,” Aftergood said. “Acquiring, preserving, reviewing and ultimately providing public access to presidential records is becoming an increasingly unmanageable task, according to the [Government Accountability Office] and [Congressional Research Service].”

    That being said, an incoming Biden National Security Council, for instance, will likely not be facing a blank slate.

    “Hard copies of documents are not hard to destroy, and that is hard to stop. But with electronic records, the information ‘lives’ in a lot of places — and the White House IT system is typically not run by political appointees,” said the former Obama White House lawyer, indicating that even things that have been deleted are likely recoverable.

    Employees “held over” between administrations have traditionally been allowed to make duplicate copies of some records so that the new White House is not “starting from scratch,” he added. And not all NSC records are presidential records — much of what is in the system originated with the intelligence community and is not considered a presidential record.

    “The good news is that many or most officials at the NSC and elsewhere seem to be scrupulous about their legal duties to preserve official records,” Aftergood said. “The bad news is that not all of them are.”
    ______________

    A new thread to cover the 70+ days of the transition from Trump to Biden
    “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
    ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

  • #2
    President-Elect Biden is turning to science and medicine in order to confront COVID.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/live-up...advisory-board

    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

    Comment


    • #3
      A little-known Trump appointee is in charge of handing transition resources to Biden — and she isn’t budging

      A Trump administration appointee is refusing to sign a letter allowing President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team to formally begin its work this week, in another sign the incumbent president has not acknowledged Biden’s victory and could disrupt the transfer of power.


      The administrator of the General Services Administration, the low-profile agency in charge of federal buildings, has a little-known role when a new president is elected: to sign paperwork officially turning over millions of dollars, as well as give access to government officials, office space in agencies and equipment authorized for the taxpayer-funded transition teams of the winner.
      It amounts to a formal declaration by the federal government, outside of the media, of the winner of the presidential race.

      But by Sunday evening, almost 36 hours after media outlets projected Biden as the winner, GSA Administrator Emily Murphy had written no such letter. And the Trump administration, in keeping with the president’s failure to concede the election, has no immediate plans to sign one. This could lead to the first transition delay in modern history, except in 2000, when the Supreme Court decided a recount dispute between Al Gore and George W. Bush in December.

      ....

      Comment


      • #4


        Murphy has drawn unusual scrutiny for her obscure position. The GSA signed a lease with the Trump Organization for the president's Washington hotel, and under her leadership, refused to provide Congressional Democrats with financial information about the company in its probe of whether Trump's ownership of the hotel stood in violation of the Constitution's Emoluments Clause. The agency's inspector general later found that the GSA had "improperly" ignored concerns about the Emoluments Clause in allowing the Trump Organization to keep its lease.

        The GSA also abruptly canceled plans to build a new FBI headquarters, which Democrats alleged was torpedoed in order to prevent a competing hotel from being built at the current location down the street from Trump's hotel. Link
        Another one of Trump's swamp creatures
        “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
        ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

        Comment


        • #5
          Biden transition threatens legal action on GSA decision

          Joe Biden's transition team is warning that it may take "legal action" if the General Services Administration fails to make an official determination that Biden has won the election.

          Driving the news: GSA Administrator Emily Murphy, a Trump political appointee, has not made the declaration — a so-called "ascertainment" — that would allow officials from Biden’s agency review teams access to the information they need in order to get to work.
          • "There's a number of levers on the table and all options are certainly available," a Biden transition official told reporters.
          • "It's a changing situation and certainly rather fluid."
          The big picture: The Presidential Transition Act governs how the outgoing administration is required to cooperate with the incoming one, smoothing the way for a peaceful transfer for power.
          • Most official GSA ascertainments have been made within 24 hours of the election, with the exception of the 2000 contest, when the outcome in Florida was down to some 500 votes, the officials said.
          Why it matters: Absent a GSA declaration, the incoming administration doesn’t have access to agencies to look at the non-public books, slowing their ability to change policy direction. They also don’t have access to:
          • Office space, computers and mobile phones.
          • The $6.3 million in appropriated funds.
          • Classified information or secured facilities to review it.
          • The ability to request security clearances or background checks for potential cabinet nominees.
          _________

          Let's see just how loyal Trump's swamp creature is willing to be in the face of legal action against her.

          “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
          ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
            One lingering question is whether President-elect Joe Biden, as he attempts to repair the United States’ relationships with allies Trump has alienated, will be able to review transcripts of Trump’s past calls with foreign leaders.
            That provides future administrations political cover to ignore much of what Trump might have said in undocumented communications. Undocumented handshake deals with Trump do not exist after he is no longer POTUS.

            For any undocumented agreement or commitment that is undesirable, since there is no record, it simply never happened; and any fault in that lies with the Trump administration.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
              Murphy has drawn unusual scrutiny for her obscure position. The GSA signed a lease with the Trump Organization for the president's Washington hotel, and under her leadership, refused to provide Congressional Democrats with financial information about the company in its probe of whether Trump's ownership of the hotel stood in violation of the Constitution's Emoluments Clause. The agency's inspector general later found that the GSA had "improperly" ignored concerns about the Emoluments Clause in allowing the Trump Organization to keep its lease.
              Another one of Trump's swamp creatures
              Seems like something that could be subject of federal criminal investigation next year.

              I am not a lawyer or any expert in the law, and am left wondering if any of this could be construed as RICO predicates. RICO legislation has great big sharp teeth. Perhaps some kleptocratic criminal acts might be viewed as and treated as racketeering.

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              Comment


              • #8
                Keep in mind one of the issues uncovered by the 9-11 Commission was the delay in transition beginning in 2000 helped lead to the shortfalls in security which allowed 9-11 to occur.

                And there was zero turbulence in the National Security infrastructure vice what we are seeing today.
                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                Mark Twain

                Comment


                • #9
                  White House attorney dispatched to agency blocking Biden transition

                  WASHINGTON — Five days before the presidential election, President Trump quietly dispatched attorney Trent Benishek of the White House general counsel’s office to the General Services Administration.

                  The agency, which oversees government leases among other administrative tasks, is little known to the general public. Nor is Benishek’s name among those that have become a staple of Trumpworld reporting.

                  Accordingly, the move attracted no notice as the nation, and the world, focused on the Nov. 3 presidential election, perhaps the most consequential in modern American history.

                  There was little but the obligatory press release, which said that as the new general counsel of the GSA, as well as its top ethics official, Benishek would “advise in the formulation and promulgation of GSA policies and regulations, oversee the agency’s litigation, and provide overall direction.”

                  Then came Trump’s defeat at the hands of his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, announced on Saturday. Even as Biden emerged as the president-elect, Trump persisted in falsely claiming electoral fraud on the part of the Democrats. Republicans have, for the most part, stood by Trump, if not quite as enthusiastically as he may have hoped.

                  In refusing to acknowledge Biden’s victory, Trump has found a critical ally in Emily Murphy, the GSA administrator he appointed in 2017. She has so far declined to provide Biden with the transition resources — namely, office space and money, as well as governmental email accounts — her agency is legally mandated to offer an incoming president.

                  The GSA is also supposed to name a federal transition coordinator to facilitate the immensely complex role of turning the federal bureaucracy from one administration to another. Back in April, Russell Vought, who heads the White House budget office, issued a memorandum instructing federal agencies to comply with the Presidential Transition Act, which was first passed in 1963 and has been amended since then.

                  That work cannot begin until Murphy “ascertains” the election. As the Washington Post first reported, she has so far refused to so.

                  Benishek could prove a crucial ally in that effort, Democrats fear. “It can’t be good,” says Kimberly Wehle, a former assistant U.S. attorney. “It could be Trump ensuring that he controls all the potential havoc buttons these last few weeks of his presidency.”

                  The GSA does not have the power to stop the transition, explains Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., who sits on the House Oversight Committee and is an attorney. Certification of the election is completed by the individual states. However, Khanna went on to say, Benishek could direct Murphy to slow down the transition, which could buy the Trump campaign more time to find new means to reverse the will of the American electorate.

                  “Every day partisan operatives running the Trump GSA dangle critical resources over President-elect Biden’s transition team is a day our national security and public health is dangerously undermined during a global pandemic,” said Kyle Herrig, president of the progressive government watchdog Accountable.US.

                  One top official who was involved in the Obama transition in 2008 speculated that the young attorney was put there “to keep tabs on Murphy.” The former transition member, who would only discuss the matter on the condition of anonymity, went further, speculating that Benishek “was installed there so the [White House] could fire the administrator and chief of staff, then have [Benishek] take over the agency to stop the ascertainment,” a reference to the process GSA undertakes during a presidential transition.

                  Though Murphy is a Republican, she is not a White House insider, meaning that she may not be fully trusted to do the president’s bidding.

                  “GSA Administrator Emily Murphy must begin the Biden transition without delay,” Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., who sits on the House Oversight Committee, told Yahoo News. “The administrator plays a critical role in the peaceful transfer of power and ensuring vital government services are not disrupted. This is all the more important amid a deadly pandemic. She should do the right thing.”

                  That would be in keeping with the Trump administration’s last-ditch effort to remake the federal bureaucracy in its own image, which has included high-profile moves like Monday’s firing of Pentagon chief Mark Esper, an ouster many predict will be followed by those of CIA Director Gina Haspel and FBI Director Chris Wray.

                  Trump has also fired Bonnie Glick, head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, who last Friday became the first senior official to lose her job in the wake of election night.

                  Many of the personnel moves in recent months have been engineered by Johnny McEntee, a former football player at the University of Connecticut who served as Trump’s “body man” during the 2016 presidential campaign. He later followed the victorious real estate magnate to the White House, only to face an embarrassing dismissal in early 2018 for what were reported to be gambling-related problems.

                  McEntee returned to the White House in January, assuming control of the Presidential Personnel Office, despite having none of the managerial executive experience such an office would ordinarily demand. He has spent much of the year ferreting out suspected fifth columnists within the federal bureaucracy and installing Trump loyalists in their place. Those loyalists included college students with no experience in government.

                  Since the election, McEntee has also been looking to punish any administration officials who may be looking for employment beyond Jan. 20, when Biden will assume the oath of office.

                  A White House communications official told Yahoo News that he could not comment on personnel matters.

                  McEntee did not respond to a request for comment.

                  It’s not clear just what GSA’s continued refusal to cooperate with the Biden transition would accomplish, says Max Stier, the founder of the Partnership for Public Service, which runs the Center for Presidential Transition. The agency does not have the power to either certify or reject the outcome of an election; it is merely supposed to help the winner of that election get ready for office.

                  “I think it’s a mistake,” Stier says.

                  Benishek first came to Washington in 2002 as a delegate for youth government, intended to work on mock legislation “to ban flag-burning.”

                  Later, he served as the finance director for his father, Dan Benishek, who would serve three terms in the House of Representatives as a Republican in the Wisconsin delegation. In 2013, the elder Benishek was accused of improper use of private aircraft, and his son, the future White House lawyer, represented his father before the Federal Election Commission

                  In a 3-2 ruling, the commissioners decided not to take any action against the congressman. Among those election commissioners was Don McGahn, who would become White House counsel in 2017.

                  Trent Benishek joined the counsel’s office, from Gibson, Dunn, a prestigious law firm with close ties to the upper reaches of the Trump administration.

                  During his time at the White House, Benishek worked on the impeachment of the president, which began in the summer of 2019 and culminated in an acquittal before a bitterly divided Senate earlier this year.

                  Benishek is one of 12 attorneys for the president listed as an author of a memorandum on impeachment submitted to the Senate. That memo calls the articles of impeachment “an affront to the Constitution and to our democratic institutions” while denouncing the Democrats’ “rigged process.”

                  Just what those claims could mean for the GSA is unclear, as the agency tends to stay out of electoral politics — and did, until very recently.

                  The agency has attracted attention ever since the Trump name came to be emblazoned on the Old Post Office, a grand building just blocks from the White House that is now the Trump International Hotel. Though that now-infamous lease was signed under the Obama administration, the notion of a president acting as a hotelier (through a company he claims he has stepped away from) brought the GSA undesired attention.

                  Murphy came to the GSA after working for Republicans on Capitol Hill and the Republican National Committee. Democrats have charged her with lax oversight of the Trump hotel lease, in particular regarding spending by foreign governments there.

                  At a hearing earlier this year, Murphy claimed ignorance of the whole issue. “The only thing I know,” she said, “is what I’ve read in the paper.”


                  _____

                  Another swamp creature gets added to the sewer



                  “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                  ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JRT View Post

                    Seems like something that could be subject of federal criminal investigation next year.

                    I am not a lawyer or any expert in the law, and am left wondering if any of this could be construed as RICO predicates. RICO legislation has great big sharp teeth. Perhaps some kleptocratic criminal acts might be viewed as and treated as racketeering.
                    As long as the GOP has control of the Senate, such investigations will go nowhere fast.
                    “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                    ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Democrats demand Trump officials preserve records amid transition

                      Nearly two dozen House committee chairs sent letters to Trump administration officials Tuesday demanding they adhere to records preservation rules ahead of the transfer of power next year.

                      The Democrats’ push targeted over 50 federal agencies and departments, including the Executive Office of the President at the White House, and directed recipients to comply with the applicable federal law and regulations, as well as preserve records that may be subject to congressional subpoenas or investigations.

                      “Over the last four years, the Administration obstructed numerous congressional investigations by refusing to provide responsive information,” lawmakers wrote. “You are obligated to ensure that any information previously requested by Congress—and any other information that is required by law to be preserved—is saved and appropriately archived in a manner that is easily retrievable.”

                      The federal government has stretched the limits of recordkeeping rules under President Donald Trump — whose personal habit of tearing up documents that cross his desk led to staffers taping them back up to comply with the Presidential Records Act.

                      In other instances, top officials have used personal email accounts or encrypted messaging apps to conduct government business, complicating the archival effort and potentially impeding the incoming administration’s ability to take the helm of the vast federal apparatus.

                      The Trump administration has also stymied Democrats on a number of oversight fronts since they took the House in 2018, particularly during the impeachment process when the White House rebuffed a series of congressional requests for testimony and documents.
                      ___________
                      “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                      ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pompeo on election results: 'There will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration

                        Secretary of State Mike Pompeo battled reporters over President Trump’s refusal to accept the results of the presidential election, predicting “there will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration” despite the fact that former Vice President Joe Biden is the projected winner of the race.

                        The comment from Pompeo, a top ally of the president, came during a combative news conference at the State Department on Tuesday when the Cabinet member was asked whether the agency is prepared to engage with President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team.

                        "There will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration," Pompeo replied with a smile.

                        “We're ready,” Pompeo continued. “The world is watching what's taking place. We're gonna count all the votes. When the process is complete, there'll be electors selected. There's a process. The Constitution lays it out pretty clearly. The world should have every confidence that the transition necessary to make sure that the State Department is functional today ... and successful with a president who's in office on Jan. 20, a minute after noon, will also be successful.”

                        Pompeo appeared to smirk after delivering the line about a "second Trump administration," though it was unclear from his remarks themselves whether he was joking. The State Department did not immediately respond to an inquiry about his comments.

                        The secretary of State's remark quickly drew widespread attention and could signal to U.S. allies and enemies alike how to handle results in their own elections.

                        Pompeo, who is seen as a possible 2024 presidential contender, also dismissed as “ridiculous” a separate question on whether he has given guidance to diplomats to refer to Biden as "president-elect" and whether Trump’s refusal to accept the results undermines the State Department’s frequent statements calling for free and fair elections in other countries.

                        “That's ridiculous, and you know it's ridiculous, and you asked it because it's ridiculous,” Pompeo said. ”This department cares deeply to make sure that elections around the world are safe and secure and free and fair, and my officers risk their lives to ensure that that happens. They work diligently on that. We often encounter situations where it's not clear about a particular election. We work to uncover facts, we work to do discovery, to learn whether in fact the outcome, the decision that was made reflected the will of the people. That's our responsibility.”

                        “The United States has an election system that is laid out deeply in our Constitution, and we're going to make sure that we get that right,” he added. “You want every vote to be counted. You want to run the process. We want the lot to be imposed in a way that reflects the reality of what took place, and that's what I think we're engaged in here in the United States and that’s what we work on every place all across the world.”

                        Pompeo then ended the news conference.
                        It is best if the US refrains from commenting on Democratic processes in other countries henceforth after this embarrassing display.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                          As long as the GOP has control of the Senate, such investigations will go nowhere fast.
                          It might not happen, but decisions in federal presecutorial discretions won't come from the Senate.
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                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Firestorm View Post
                            It is best if the US refrains from commenting on Democratic processes in other countries henceforth after this embarrassing display.
                            If anything it will be a display of lawful democracy in action. Trump will exercise his rights under the law, and will continue to lie and mislead. Biden will be sworn into office as POTUS-46 on January 20, 2021, regardless any action by Trump and his quickly shrinking group of henchmen.

                            Trump will lose a lot of support quickly when he cannot deliver anything to his supporters, cannot appoint more justices to SCOTUS, cannot appoint more conservative judges to federal courts, cannot strip regulations. Many of his supporters were holding their noses to get what they wanted, and when that is over, when POTUS-45 Trump transitions to just being sideshow-Donny ranting on some extreme right media channel, and can no longer deliver any usable advantage, then most of that support snuffs out like a burned matchstick.
                            Last edited by JRT; 10 Nov 20,, 23:17.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Firestorm View Post
                              Pompeo on election results: 'There will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration



                              It is best if the US refrains from commenting on Democratic processes in other countries henceforth after this embarrassing display.
                              Incorrect. What you should be saying is that anyone Trump related refrain from commenting on the democratic process in other countries and you would then be completely correct.

                              Comment

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