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FM 22-5 Drill & Ceremonies Obama Style

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  • Tamara
    replied
    Originally posted by desertswo View Post
    When I was doing OPPEs (you might remember that experience) with CINCPACFLT PEB, ship's company always felt it was necessary to ply us with "tech manuals" and "training videos" as if that was going swing our decisions in any way. We never watched a one; not because we were particularly averse to doing so, but we were just too busy, and only returned to the "caucus room," where they staged that stuff, to document our findings. Frankly, we were just too tired between inspections and engineering casualty control drills to do much more than inspect the back side of our eyelids while seated around the table.
    Well, know your mark.

    That disbursing officer was single and something of leech. He was a rooster in tennis shoes. The ploy I did on him I would never have thought to do on the previous lamb chop. He was a man who traded duty days in liberty ports so he could have as much time off as possible in home port with his family.

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  • snapper
    replied
    Originally posted by desertswo View Post
    We are different, and hold ourselves apart. Not everyone believes this, but trust me, it is a weltanschauung that permeates the force from head to toe. In my view, that is a little dangerous.
    Sounds like the film;

    Lt Kaffee (Tom Cruise): "I want the truth!"

    Col. Jessep (Jack Nicholson): "You can't handle the truth!"

    "Son, we live in a world that has walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with guns. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinburg? I have a greater responsibility than you could possibly fathom. You weep for Santiago, and you curse the Marines. You have that luxury. You have the luxury of not knowing what I know. That Santiago's death, while tragic, probably saved lives. And my existence, while grotesque and incomprehensible to you, saves lives. You don't want the truth because deep down in places you don't talk about at parties, you want me on that wall, you need me on that wall. We use words like honor, code, loyalty. We use these words as the backbone of a life spent defending something. You use them as a punchline. I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. I would rather you just said thank you, and went on your way, Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a weapon, and stand a post. Either way, I don't give a damn what you think you are entitled to."

    Having seen my first conflict zone this year (and I don't serve on the front line) I tend to agree. I pray God I never have go near another conflict but I wonder how much our politicians understand the horror they create from ignorance? Respect for those willing to lay down their lives for their nation should be a given but to too many politicians war is a game. Si vis pacem, para bellum.

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  • desertswo
    replied
    Originally posted by Tamara View Post
    I was on ship where the disbursing officer was in hack in home port after deployment. I felt sorry for him, so I lent him a "six pack" of X rated VHS flicks. Curiously enough, my request for off base housing funds went through quick enough...................

    ..................I did say I could be treacherous.
    When I was doing OPPEs (you might remember that experience) with CINCPACFLT PEB, ship's company always felt it was necessary to ply us with "tech manuals" and "training videos" as if that was going swing our decisions in any way. We never watched a one; not because we were particularly averse to doing so, but we were just too busy, and only returned to the "caucus room," where they staged that stuff, to document our findings. Frankly, we were just too tired between inspections and engineering casualty control drills to do much more than inspect the back side of our eyelids while seated around the table.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tamara
    replied
    Originally posted by desertswo View Post
    Yes, I found that occasionally physical size was a valuable adjunct to leadership. Some youngsters under one's command stop being little a*r*s*eholes when people my size lean in close and quietly remind them, with both a smile and a menacing glare, that one can "take away their birthday" if so desired. Not really, but they know the meaning of the phrase in the US Navy. Nothing worse than being confined to the ship for 60 days when in port, and everyone else is going on liberty. It's like being in jail with the added kick in the mental nuts of being in close company with everyone else who behaves themselves leading normal lives, having fun, and going home to their spouses and families every night. ......
    I was on ship where the disbursing officer was in hack in home port after deployment. I felt sorry for him, so I lent him a "six pack" of X rated VHS flicks. Curiously enough, my request for off base housing funds went through quick enough...................

    ..................I did say I could be treacherous.

    Leave a comment:


  • desertswo
    replied
    Originally posted by sated buddha View Post
    Sir, that's every bit a 300 kilo bench-pressing rockstar.
    Yes, I found that occasionally physical size was a valuable adjunct to leadership. Some youngsters under one's command stop being little a*r*s*eholes when people my size lean in close and quietly remind them, with both a smile and a menacing glare, that one can "take away their birthday" if so desired. Not really, but they know the meaning of the phrase in the US Navy. Nothing worse than being confined to the ship for 60 days when in port, and everyone else is going on liberty. It's like being in jail with the added kick in the mental nuts of being in close company with everyone else who behaves themselves leading normal lives, having fun, and going home to their spouses and families every night.

    And I do indeed play a mean guitar, and perform in a few local garage bands for fun.

    Originally posted by sated buddha View Post
    May I also suggest a very tastefully restored 1945 Indian Chief to complete the picture. After a lifetime pitching up and down on the water, some nice two wheeled RnR is called for on your lovely roads.
    There was a guy who had a small, sort of niche, motorcycle sales and repair shop not far from where I grew up in San Diego, whose improbable name was Sonny Angel (sounded like something out of Hollywood central casting). He would repair Harleys and such, but he sold and specialized in the repair of European bikes like Moto Guzzi and Husqvarna as he had been a racer himself as a much younger man (he recently died and was well into his 90s when he did). He also restored Indians and had a couple in his show floor window as teases to attract customers. They were indeed beautiful bikes.

    In my own case, I used to ride dirt bikes starting when I was 11-years old. I was already a pretty big kid by the time I was 12, and had a 1968 250CC Yamaha Enduro. Then when I was 13, I saw my best friend, also 13, basically get decapitated, helmet and all. My mother asked me, not ordered me, but asked me to stop riding and sell the bike and promise her never to ride a motorcycle again. I was pretty shaken up myself, and I did what she requested. I have often had the itch, but I have honored her request and my promise to this day, even though she left us seven years ago. My back, hips and knees are so screwed up now days, I couldn't ride a bike if I wanted to anyway.

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  • desertswo
    replied
    Originally posted by sated buddha View Post
    Jai Hind is not necessarily military only. In Delhi for example, in South Block, its the de rigeur salutation, as in most Hindi speaking government circles. Here, we add the regional Jai Maharashtra as the suffix to the Jai Hind.

    So Jai Hind just rolls comfortably off a true Indian's tongue, be he military or civilian. Its said eye to eye, with pride, with honor.

    You are right. Its the salutes that floor me. I instinctively know I cannot / should not salute back (our civilian politicians do on flag hoisting and parade occasions though .....). Hence was asking. An yes, they are all ex army. Not paramilitary, BSF, etc.

    Normally the norm here, otherwise, when not wearing the beret, and driving a car or riding a bike, is to stiffen your arms (and back) in acknowledgment.
    I'm fascinated by all of this. I would love to visit India, as I am a fan of its people, and its food:hug:. Of course, many of you now live here. My dentist, who is very good, is originally from India, as is my gastroenterologist who literally saved my life. Also, about a mile from my home out here in the desert is a beautiful Sikh Temple. recently built, complete with golden domes, etc. They are wonderful people and my children went to school and are friends with several of the children of the congregation (not sure that is a proper term to use, but I think you know what I mean). I may be in the minority of former and current US military contributors to these threads, but I am supportive of Congressional efforts to convince the US military to ease uniform requirements for members of the Sikh faith. Given their history as a martial society and their performance in two World Wars and elsewhere, I believe this is a new American asset that ought not to be ignored.

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  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Buy them a scotch on 11 November.

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  • sated buddha
    replied
    double

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  • sated buddha
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    Here's the rule

    Sounds like they saluting you was a case of "to be safe than sorry." Too many military/former military in civie clothing.
    Sir me and some of the saluting ex soldiers have been in the same place 10 years now.

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  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Here's the rule

    755. Saluting by JCOs, WOs, NCOs & OR.— (a) JCOs, WOs, NCOs and men will salute all commissioned officers whom they know to be such, whether in uniform or not, including officers of the Indian Navy, Indian Air Force and officers of the Territorial Army and the National Cadet Corps when in uniform. JCOs, WOs, NCOs and men will salute with the right hand. Where from physical incapacity a right hand salute is impossible, the salute will be given with the left hand.
    Sounds like they saluting you was a case of "to be safe than sorry." Too many military/former military in civie clothing.

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  • sated buddha
    replied
    double

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  • sated buddha
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    A formal salute or just tipping the forehead? A formal salute requires you keeping the hand position until a return salute is given.
    Sir it is a full on, elaborate, stiffening salute. If they (the officers behind the glass cabin versus the standing sentries) are sitting, they stand and do the same.

    I am the one who dips my head and replies to their Jai Hind with a similar Jai Hind. Or accompanied by a hand wave.

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  • desertswo
    replied
    Originally posted by Oracle View Post
    Defence base is not what I was talking about, Sir. I was talking about civilian life. :)
    Ah, that was not clear to me. No, no one would ever know who I was out in the world.

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  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    A formal salute or just tipping the forehead? A formal salute requires you keeping the hand position until a return salute is given.

    Leave a comment:


  • sated buddha
    replied
    Originally posted by chanjyj View Post
    I don't know about the salutes. If it is a military to non-military exchange of courtesies, AND they are retired, AND not in uniform, I find it rather weird.
    The "Jai Hind" on the other hand doesn't seem to be a solely military thing?
    Jai Hind is not necessarily military only. In Delhi for example, in South Block, its the de rigeur salutation, as in most Hindi speaking government circles. Here, we add the regional Jai Maharashtra as the suffix to the Jai Hind.

    So Jai Hind just rolls comfortably off a true Indian's tongue, be he military or civilian. Its said eye to eye, with pride, with honor.

    You are right. Its the salutes that floor me. I instinctively know I cannot / should not salute back (our civilian politicians do on flag hoisting and parade occasions though .....). Hence was asking. An yes, they are all ex army. Not paramilitary, BSF, etc.

    Normally the norm here, otherwise, when not wearing the beret, and driving a car or riding a bike, is to stiffen your arms (and back) in acknowledgment.
    Last edited by sated buddha; 01 Oct 14,, 14:14.

    Leave a comment:

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