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Staff Sgt Bales - Life without parole

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  • Staff Sgt Bales - Life without parole

    U.S. soldier who killed Afghan villagers gets life without parole
    Aug 23, 2013

    (Reuters) - A decorated American soldier was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole on Friday for killing 16 unarmed Afghan civilians, mostly women and children, in two bloody nighttime forays from his military post.
    Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, a veteran of four combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, has admitted to slaughtering the villagers in attacks on their family compounds in Kandahar province in March 2012. He pleaded guilty to the killings in June in a deal that spared him the death penalty, and a sentencing jury of six military personnel deliberated less than two hours on Friday before deciding he should spend the rest of his life in prison. Bales, who appeared in a military court in Washington state in blue military dress, showed no emotion as the verdict was handed down, but his mother cried and rocked back and forth.

    Army prosecutors said Bales acted alone and with premeditation when, armed with a pistol, a rifle and a grenade launcher, he left his outpost twice during the night, returning in the middle of his rampage to tell a fellow soldier, "I just shot up some people." The killings marked the worst case of civilian deaths blamed on a rogue U.S. soldier since the Vietnam War and further eroded strained U.S.-Afghan relations after more than a decade of conflict in Afghanistan. "He wiped out generations and he ruined lives forever," prosecutor Lieutenant Colonel Jay Morse told the jury in his closing arguments. "He should be known by one official title from this day until the day he dies: inmate." In arguing for life without parole, Morse told jurors that Bales lacked a moral compass, and played video in which Bales could be seen returning to base on the day of the killings, cloaked in a blanket snatched during the rampage. "This is the walk of a cold blooded killer," Morse said.

    Defense attorneys had contended that Bales carried out the killings after suffering a breakdown under the pressure of the last of his four deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. They said he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury even before shipping off to Kandahar province. "We won the case when we got the death penalty off the table," John Henry Browne, one of Bales' attorneys, said in a statement after the sentence was handed down, adding the defense would mount an automatic appeal.

    Some Afghan survivors of the attack and family members of the victims who had been flown to the United States to testify about the impact of the shooting later expressed disappointment at a news conference that the penalty was not stronger. "This murderer jumped into my house in the middle of the night, killed 11 members of my family and then burned them," said villager Hajji Mohammad Wazir, who lost his wife and six of his seven children, among other relatives, in the attacks. "We were brought all the way here from Afghanistan to see if justice would be served. But not our way. The justice was served (in the) American way, their way," he said. "We wanted this murderer to be executed but we didn't get our wish."

    Prior to the sentencing, Bales told the jury on Thursday he had struggled with anger issues that worsened after his third military deployment, but that he had tried to disguise his problems behind a veneer of normalcy. He said he briefly sought treatment before his final deployment but stopped after he felt it was not working. He also apologized, both to his fellow servicemen and to the Afghan villagers, for the killings, saying: "What I did is an act of cowardice behind a mask of fear, bullshit and bravado."
    Source: Reuters

    I agree with the military sentencing jury. He knew what he did and returned to base to rearm and continue the slaughter. Such behavior constitutes premeditated and wanton murder.
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  • #2
    The most extreme federal supermax sentence for him.

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    • #3
      I prefer a firing squad.

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      • #4
        Put him in the hole right next to Hasan. Same treatment.
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        Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

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        • #5
          The detention barracks at Ft Leavenworth is MUCH worse than any federal prison. He will work his ass off every day until he is dead.
          “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
          Mark Twain

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
            I prefer a firing squad.
            I would prefer the gallows, but the govt prosecutors accepted a plea bargain. The military jury gave him the harshest sentence possible under the deal.
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            • #7
              Maybe he and Hasan can be cell mates. I'm sure they'd have a lot to talk about.
              If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

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              • #8
                A firing squad is too easy for this asshole. He needs to suffer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                  The detention barracks at Ft Leavenworth is MUCH worse than any federal prison. He will work his ass off every day until he is dead.
                  Yeah, it's what we in the Navy/Marine Corps team refer to as a "red line brig." Why? Because there is a red line painted on the deck, that the inmate has to follow around during the daily routine. Step off the red line and bad things happen; or so I'm told. Basically, it's a "Ground Hog Day" of the worst day of boot camp until the day one dies. That's the "urban legend" in the Navy, only it is my understanding that it is more fact legend.

                  I had a friend at one command to which I was assigned, Surface Warfare Officers School Command Detachment Coronado (it no longer exists), which was at the Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, where Basic Underwater Demolition training (BUDs) also is located, who was assigned, along with the regular enlisted brig chasers, to escort a disgraced Navy Supply Corps Officer to Leavenworth. The guy had been convicted of cooking the books and somehow skimming money that he needed to support his gambling habit. As they invariably do, he go caught and was sentenced to something like eight years. For some reason, a commissioned officer was required to escort another, even if only for show. Anyway, my friend said that upon arrival the place was pretty grim; and the barking of orders started immediately. I could handle a lot of things, but all boot camp all the time wouldn't be one I'd like to entertain.

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                  • #10
                    Well what happens if the guy refuses to work. He knows that he cannot get out so it doesn't matter whether he follows orders or not. He can keep disobeying orders and eventually people will get tire of him and don't give a shit about it and leave him alone to rot. It is just that US is obligated to feed him and clothe him and make sure he has access to sanitary facilities whether he disobey orders or not.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Blademaster View Post
                      Well what happens if the guy refuses to work.
                      There are other ways to make his life hell. Any good NCO knows a few examples

                      He knows that he cannot get out so it doesn't matter whether he follows orders or not. He can keep disobeying orders and eventually people will get tire of him and don't give a shit about it and leave him alone to rot.
                      Maybe in a federal prison. Where the guards are at that prison for their whole career.

                      But the cool thing about Leavenworth is that the Guards only serve 3 years there. And during that three years, they will work various parts of the prison. Not just the lifer ward. About the time that a guard gets tired of dealing with that scumbag, a new guard will replace him. With a whole new set of games to play.

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                      • #12


                        Convicted murderer Staff Sgt Robert Bales will be incarcerated at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks (The Castle) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The current all-male 515-bed facility was opened in 2002 and is the only maximum-security (Level 3) prison in the Department of Defense. The prison is surrounded by two 14' fences topped with razor wire. Security cameras capture every action in every cell and corner of the prison. US military female felons are incarcerated at the Naval Consolidated Brig in San Diego. Of 440 male inmates at the USDB, six are currently on death row and 10 are serving life without parole. Only enlisted prisoners with sentences over ten years, commissioned officers, and prisoners convicted of offenses related to national security are confined to the USDB. Corrections personnel at the prison are Army Corrections Specialists (MOS 31E) trained at the U.S. Army Military Police school located at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, as well as Marine and Air Force corrections personnel.

                        Prisoners lives are molded by the degree of supervision needed to minimize risk to others. The special-housing unit (SHU) is reserved for inmates who could be locked up 23 hours a day. Each cell (called a pod) is triangular in shape and faces a common area. Each pod has a window and a door. There are no bars. Food is slid into cells through narrow slots and a small window at the foot of each door lets the correctional specialists chain inmates ankles before they’re escorted out for showers or fresh air. The USDB has operated since 1875. Sexual offenses currently account for more than half of inmates’ crimes. Since 1945 there have been 21 executions at the USDB, the last execution was conducted April 13, 1961. All executions at the USDB thus far have been by hanging, but lethal injection has been specified as the military's current mode of execution.

                        USDB prisoners are required to work 40 hours per week on maintenance, warehouse, laundry, and kitchen details, though multiple vocational training programs are available. Inmates are paid very meager sums for work but are allowed to be sent money orders. Inmates can see visitors any day of the week, though usually only during evening hours on weekdays. No conjugal visits are allowed at USDB. Deceased inmates not claimed by family members are buried at the old USDB facility. The average time-served at the USDB is 19 years.
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                        • #13
                          I think I would rather be executed if I was in that position as a lifer , Fony bliars missis would make hay there in her human rights foray .

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                          • #14
                            It is Suck City.
                            “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                            Mark Twain

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                            • #15
                              locking him up in a prison like this is inhumane...

                              We should let him go.

                              Just drop him off somewhere in the Kandahar province without a gun.

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