Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Soldier dies after transplant

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soldier dies after transplant

    How incredibly tragic and saddening



    Lung transplant was cancerous .Cpl Matthew Millington, 31, had the transplant after he fell seriously ill.

    But less than a year later the soldier, from Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, died after it transpired he had been given cancerous lungs from a donor who had smoked.

    An inquest last week heard he died of complications of transplant surgery and immuno-suppressive drug treatment, it has been reported.

    Cpl Millington, who served in the Queen's Royal Lancers, was serving in Iraq in 2005 when he was diagnosed with an incurable condition and told he would die unless he had a transplant.

    He received a double lung transplant in April 2007 at the Papworth Hospital - the UK's largest specialist cardiothoracic hospital.

    But doctors discovered a tumour in the new lungs and despite radiotherapy, Cpl Millington died in February last year, just 10 months after the supposedly life-saving operation.

    A spokeswoman for Papworth Hospital said it was an extremely rare case. She said: "Papworth Hospital has a very strong track record of high quality outcomes and this is an extremely rare case. Patients who are accepted on to the transplant waiting list have no other option open to them however we must stress that all donor organs are screened rigorously prior to transplantation.

    "Using lungs from donors who have smoked in the past is not unusual. During 2008/09 146 lung transplants were carried out in the UK. During the same period 84 people died on the waiting list. If we had a policy that said we did not use the lungs of those who had smoked, then the number of lung transplants carried out would have been significantly lower."

    Mr Millington's family told the Stoke Sentinel they had nothing against the hospital. Father Lester told the paper: "We have absolutely nothing against them at all. It is a brilliant place and they are so friendly."

  • #2
    So why is this tragic? He got almost a year more than he would have without the transplant.

    Sometimes it seems that we cannot see the forrest for the trees.

    Comment


    • #3
      He was a Bone Head. Bit tragic mind.

      Comment


      • #4
        Transplant Coordination to would-be doners: "Do you smoke" No.."Thank you" ..Yes.."no thanks". To live an extra year or so, going through treatment and at times quite evasive treatment is not a good deal to me.

        Comment


        • #5
          Seems a bit strange that they would use a Smokers Lungs. Bit like giving someone a liver from a Whisky drinker.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
            Seems a bit strange that they would use a Smokers Lungs. Bit like giving someone a liver from a Whisky drinker.
            That's me off the list. They actualy pay Tankie NOT to donate. We live in tragic times and they don't want to add to it;)

            Let's hope this error of errors will never be repeated. Tragic for the Family of the Soldier and deepest condolences to them.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dave lukins View Post
              That's me off the list. They actualy pay Tankie NOT to donate. We live in tragic times and they don't want to add to it;)

              Let's hope this error of errors will never be repeated. Tragic for the Family of the Soldier and deepest condolences to them.
              But it is common practice:

              "Using lungs from donors who have smoked in the past is not unusual. During 2008/09 146 lung transplants were carried out in the UK. During the same period 84 people died on the waiting list. If we had a policy that said we did not use the lungs of those who had smoked, then the number of lung transplants carried out would have been significantly lower."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
                But it is common practice:

                "Using lungs from donors who have smoked in the past is not unusual. During 2008/09 146 lung transplants were carried out in the UK. During the same period 84 people died on the waiting list. If we had a policy that said we did not use the lungs of those who had smoked, then the number of lung transplants carried out would have been significantly lower."
                I meant given 'cancerous' lungs rather than smokers lungs per se. What do you think of the Opt-out/in saga?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dave lukins View Post
                  That's me off the list. They actualy pay Tankie NOT to donate. We live in tragic times and they don't want to add to it;)

                  Let's hope this error of errors will never be repeated. Tragic for the Family of the Soldier and deepest condolences to them.
                  Hmmm well , its preserved quite well my liver , pickled ,

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
                    So why is this tragic? He got almost a year more than he would have without the transplant.

                    Sometimes it seems that we cannot see the forrest for the trees.
                    Another year in pain , knowing the op to save him was killing him , imo thats tragic G/G , its a bit like ,taking an engine out of a car with a busted carb and replacing it with one that has a busted carb and the big ends gone ,, his mind must have been in turmoil and i bet he questioned his God over it .

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X