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  • Would the Generation of Today be like These Guys.

    Award for 'bravest street in WWI'

    A Greater Manchester street has been honoured as the "bravest little street in England" in memory of 161 male residents who fought in World War I.

    A blue plaque was awarded to remember the men who joined up from 60 houses in Chapel Street, Altrincham.

    King George V first singled out the street's courageous residents after it provided so many volunteers.

    It was bulldozed in 1960 to build flats. The sign was erected by Trafford Council on the former site on Sunday.

    The plaque was unveiled on the wall of an Italian restaurant which now stands on part of the location.

    It reads: "Chapel Street Altrincham. From just 60 houses 161 men volunteered in the Great War 1914-18. Twenty-nine were killed. Recognised and praised by King George V"

    “ Can you imagine? One hundred and sixty-one men from 60 homes going to war ”
    David Higgins, Mayor of Trafford
    Of the street's recruits, 29 failed to return home.

    Peter Hennerley, whose grandfather Hugh, was born in the street in 1879 and served in the war with the Cheshire Regiment, helped to organise the ceremony.

    He said: "So many people from one street volunteering to go to war would not happen today."

    Mr Hennerley's 11-year-old grandson, also called Peter, unveiled the memorial with Mayor of Trafford, David Higgins.

    The plaque was dedicated by Army padre Rev Jerry Sutton, the Vicar of St Margaret's Church.

    Relatives at ceremony

    Councillor Higgins said: "I do not think that anyone cannot be moved by the tremendous sacrifices made.

    "Can you imagine? One hundred and sixty-one men from 60 homes going to war."

    More than 100 people attended the ceremony including relatives of some of the street's war veterans.

    One was Gillian Davies, 39, of Timperley, whose grandfather David Norton was one of seven brothers who fought.

    One of the brothers, Joe, won a Distinguished Conduct Medal and only one, James, died in service.

    Ms Davies said: "They were very patriotic. Everyone was signing up so it was the done thing."

    Story from BBC NEWS:
    BBC NEWS | UK | England | Manchester | Award for 'bravest street in WWI'

  • #2
    From just 60 houses 161 men volunteered in the Great War 1914-18.They were very patriotic. Everyone was signing up so it was the done thing.
    Kudos, a well deserved honour :)
    When our perils are past, shall our gratitude sleep? - George Canning sigpic

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    • #3
      Werent they nicknamed , the old pals brigade , or something along those lines , kudos indeed .

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      • #4
        If my memory serves they were indeed encouraged to enlist en mass like this and were termed something like 'Pals Battalions/Brigades' - of course the downside being that when entire units were wiped-out that specific towns and villages lost many people, rather than the casualties being spread out.........think of the effect of a Pals Division at the Somme etc

        Brett.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Enterpriser View Post
          If my memory serves they were indeed encouraged to enlist en mass like this and were termed something like 'Pals Battalions/Brigades' - of course the downside being that when entire units were wiped-out that specific towns and villages lost many people, rather than the casualties being spread out.........think of the effect of a Pals Division at the Somme etc

          Brett.
          Yes, exactly.

          BBC - History - The Pals Battalions in World War One

          In America, we had much of the same experience in our Civil War. Since units were raised on a geographic basis a hard battle could be devestating to a locality for years to come. We saw soem of this with our National Guard units in World War 2, but to a lesser extent.

          As for would the generationof today meet thsi kind of a challenge?

          Depends on how you asked them.
          “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
          Mark Twain

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
            Would the Generation of Today be like These Guys. ?
            One would hope. Time will tell though. Unfortunately, I'm sure such a time may come again.

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            • #7
              My only thoughts on this are that the streets of Manchesterstan today are full of large families claiming large sums off the state, and would feel that it isn't for them to to risk their all for a country that they want no part of, accept the cash handout's.

              JMHO.

              Tony
              Yet another ex-tankie of 1 RTR origin.

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              • #8
                The British Army today is very similar. Take my Old Regiment for example, we had 4 to 5 brothers from about 7 or 8 families, we even had sisters married to brothers, so basically we had whole families in the Regiment. In my Squadron alone there were 5 guys from my class back at school.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
                  The British Army today is very similar. Take my Old Regiment for example, we had 4 to 5 brothers from about 7 or 8 families, we even had sisters married to brothers, so basically we had whole families in the Regiment. In my Squadron alone there were 5 guys from my class back at school.
                  I am going to assume that you mean either one Tank regiments soldier's sister was married to another soldier in the same Tank Regiment or alternatively that a set of brothers in the Regiment were married to a set of sisters from another family............otherwise

                  Brett.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Enterpriser View Post
                    I am going to assume that you mean either one Tank regiments soldier's sister was married to another soldier in the same Tank Regiment or alternatively that a set of brothers in the Regiment were married to a set of sisters from another family............otherwise

                    Brett.
                    You are correct, badly worded on my part.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Enterpriser View Post
                      I am going to assume that you mean either one Tank regiments soldier's sister was married to another soldier in the same Tank Regiment or alternatively that a set of brothers in the Regiment were married to a set of sisters from another family............otherwise

                      Brett.

                      Otherwise they would be American transplants from Virginia

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                      • #12
                        I don't think I would volunteer for a WW1 style war sorry, those chaps were probably ill prepared for the realities of what they would be facing, were in a nationalistic furor and Ive read that the tons of peer pressure from people on the home front towards young men was unbearable. Now WW3 ill go might as well New York wont last long anyway :(
                        Last edited by Doomarias; 15 Sep 09,, 03:21.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Doomarias View Post
                          I don't think I would volunteer for a WW1 style war sorry, those chaps were probably ill prepared for the realities of what they would be facing, were in a nationalistic furor and not to mention the tons of peer pressure from people who couldn't go towards young men. Now WW3 ill go might as well New York wont last long anyway :(
                          D, WWI was touted as the war to end all wars. To them, this WAS the BIG ONE. Just like WW3 would be to you.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gun Grape
                            Otherwise they would be American transplants from Virginia
                            West Virginia, you mean. Or Arkansas. (Sorry zraver. :P )
                            I enjoy being wrong too much to change my mind.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ArmchairGeneral View Post
                              West Virginia, you mean. Or Arkansas. (Sorry zraver. :P )
                              AG And Gunny

                              A pox on both of you. And that's rich coming from one guy who lives in the Redneck Riviera and another who self proclaims to be from the boonies of the boonies!

                              It would be Kentucky of which you speak, anyway.

                              As for the kids today? I believe they would do it...at least the kids I know.

                              And I also believe we already had WW 3...it was called the Cold War.
                              “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                              Mark Twain

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