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Easy way to explain different military units to non-military people

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  • Easy way to explain different military units to non-military people

    I need a way to explane to none military people what the diffrance is between an Army and a Regement .
    I'm tired of haveing to tell people that a Sgt. can not run a regment of inf.
    Also I'm tired of telling them that a Destroier can not stand up to a Battleship. So if any one know a list of what is what in military units I would like to have the link to use .

  • #2
    3 sections to a platoon, 3 platoons to a company, 3 companies to a battalion, 3 battlions to a brigade/regiment, 3 brigades/regiments to a division, 3 divisions to a corps, 3 corps to an army.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
      3 sections to a platoon, 3 platoons to a company, 3 companies to a battalion, 3 battlions to a brigade/regiment, 3 brigades/regiments to a division, 3 divisions to a corps, 3 corps to an army.
      Thank you .

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      • #4
        For a civie, easiest way is 12 men, 32 men, 100 men, 300 men, 1000 men, 10,000 men, 30,000 men, and 100,000 men. - ie, Corporal so-and-so commanded 12 men, Lt whatshisname was in charged of 32 men, Major Icantrememberhisname lead 300 men, etc.

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        • #5
          I thought a battalion had over 800 men and a brigade over 3,000 men. How can a Brigade be 1000 men?

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          • #6
            You're not military illiterate. Most 3rd world brigades are in fact just 1000 men and their battalions 2-300. We just flushed ours out to the full but even then, there's a big difference between East Bloc and West Bloc formations. East Bloc battalions are just 5-600 wheras our battle groups are 1000-1200. Chinese brigades are 2500-4000. Ours are 5000-8000. However, that is getting into the nitty gritty on formations and the taskings, way too much information for the military illiterate.

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            • #7
              In the Russian Army it was 11 to a squad, 3 squads (33) to a platoon, 3 platoons to a company (99+commander), 4 companies to a batallion, 4 battallions to a regiment, 3 infantry and one arty regiments to a division. Corps and Armies had variable strengths. Brigades were not really a standardized formation.

              EDIT: These are peace time numbers. During war time battallions would be strengthened to around 600 men by enlarging the companies.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                3 sections to a platoon, 3 platoons to a company, 3 companies to a battalion, 3 battlions to a brigade/regiment, 3 brigades/regiments to a division, 3 divisions to a corps, 3 corps to an army.
                I like this explanation for why in the Commonwealth, a Regiment can be an administrative grouping or another name for a Battalion:

                "Because it just is."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
                  3 sections to a platoon, 3 platoons to a company, 3 companies to a battalion, 3 battlions to a brigade/regiment, 3 brigades/regiments to a division, 3 divisions to a corps, 3 corps to an army.
                  Maybe that's the current standard, but I was a postal clerk with the 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vietnam and that doesn't fit the model we used. It's been 38 years and I'm not completely sure about the number of companies in infantry battalions, but I think there were four plus a headquarters company. the 503rd infantry regiment had 4 battalions, although the regiment term was primarily just a designation because it didn't have its own command structure.
                  the 3/319th Artillery had at least 4 companies or batteries.

                  The Brigade itself in addition to the 503rd Airborne Infantry had a battalion of mechanized infantry (1/50th) as well as a support battalion and some additional companies such as N/75th Rangers and E troop 17th Cav. I think our engineering unit was listed as a company. Individual infantry companies had about 100 men. Platoons were divided into squads as was the case in WWII.

                  The Brigade currently has only 2 infantry battalions ( as was the case when it arrived in Vietnam) as well as support units including Artillery and a Cav unit.
                  There must be no barriers for freedom of inquiry. R. Oppenheimer

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                  • #10
                    A lot of units don't fit the standard model. In fact, there is no such thing as a standard army anymore. Most units these days are cobbled together with what's available.

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                    • #11
                      Does anyone have an idea of French and former French Colonies military organization. A commandant de brigade usually leads just a few men.

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                      • #12
                        Anyone has an idea of French and former French colonies military organization? A commandant de brigade usually leads just a few men.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ndzesop View Post
                          Anyone has an idea of French and former French colonies military organization? A commandant de brigade usually leads just a few men.
                          Which way

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tankie View Post
                            Which way
                            When retreating from the front ..............and in the unlikely event of an advance to contact from the back ....... hope this helps Eric :)
                            sigpicFEAR NAUGHT

                            Should raw analytical data ever be passed to policy makers?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by T_igger_cs_30 View Post
                              When retreating from the front ..............and in the unlikely event of an advance to contact from the back ....... hope this helps Eric :)
                              Which gave rise to their name FROGS huh ,,, HOP on me tank mon ami , ve r goink to ze rear:)

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