Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Beretta 92FS

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Beretta 92FS

    Has anybody bought one of the Beretta 96FS .40 or heard good anecdotal information on them?

    SHYT! That should have been 96 not 92
    Last edited by TopHatter; 15 Apr 05,, 21:28.
    Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

  • #2
    Some people I know are quite pleased with the ones they own. I have shot one a few times and I have no complaints. I see no reason to trade in my HK or SIG for one.
    Removing a single turd from the cesspool doesn't make any difference.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't have a 96, but I have a 92FS. Accurate (1-1/2" @ 25yds. w/silvertips) and has never stovepiped on me. I usually carry my P220, because I don't like safeties, but the Beretta is an excellent pistol that points and balances very well.
      "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

      Comment


      • #4
        They are very well balanced, but any fied-barrel gun is more accurate.
        1-1/2" at 25 yds?!? To get that kind of accuracy you'd have to have GOOD custom sights (like those on target pistols), and the gun would have to be bolted to a bench rest.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sniperdude411
          1-1/2" at 25 yds?!? To get that kind of accuracy you'd have to have GOOD custom sights (like those on target pistols), and the gun would have to be bolted to a bench rest.
          Most people do not shoot as much as I do. When I am active, I shoot about 800 rounds/month on average with my handguns, and about 1000/week in competition with my shotguns. I am also a two-time Wa State smallbore champion.

          My best 3 shot group with the Beretta is 13/16" C-to-C, but that is not typical. But 1-1/2"- 1-3/4"" is average for my Beretta and Sig both, with 5 shot groups opening up to about 2-1/2". It's a very good shooting pistol. Any top quality service pistol should be capable of sub 2" groups in the right hands. My sig can do it too, as well as all of my S&W revolvers. The only handgun that I own that can't do that is my PPK/S, and it isn't designed to, since it's a straight blowback action, not a locking barrel.

          And I don't own a gun vise. A couple of sandbags on the hood of my truck works just fine when shooting for accuracy. If a full size handgun can't hold sub 2" groups, I sell it. Most every modern handgun has good enough sights to get this level of accuracy- it's about proper technique, breathing and trigger control, and knowing the gun.
          Last edited by highsea; 16 Apr 05,, 04:13.
          "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

          Comment


          • #6
            WEll, if you have that much experiance with your pistols, and some kind of rest, than I guess you could make that kind of grouping. But I've only seen that grouping on tv shows like Shooting USA.
            Any hints on the accuracy of the walther gsp?
            http://www.carlwalther.com/images/gs...rt_2661951.jpg

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sniperdude411
              Any hints on the accuracy of the walther gsp?
              That level of accuracy is not difficult to achieve with a good service pistol. Anyone should be able to do it with a little practice as long as they have a solid technique. I am not special in that respect.

              Wrt the Walther, never shot one, so I couldn't say, but it's a world class target pistol, so 3/8"-1/2" groups @25m should be well within it's capability with good match ammo.

              The conventional NRA slow-fire outdoor (50 yard) smallbore pistol target has a 1.8" x-ring. The Walther should be able to put all the shots inside that ring easily, I would expect a 10 shot group C-to-C around .9" (1/2 the dia. of the x-ring) from a machine rest, and an expert shooter should be able to match that on a good day with a standard rest.

              All my smallbore shooting was with rifles- M52 Winchesters, 40X Remingtons, and Anschutz 54's.
              Last edited by highsea; 16 Apr 05,, 17:33.
              "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

              Comment


              • #8
                Cool. I should get one of those to pick-off some annoying squirrels when I have enough money (maybe in 10 years).
                Now there was this one REALLY WEIRD target gun used in some competition on tv one day. It was in between a rifle and a pistol (.308 caliber); it was a bolt-action, single-shot, with a scope, a pistol grip, and the action was behind the grip. It looked like a stock-less rifle with a pistol-grip that was farther forward.
                Any clues on what it was?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Silhouette pistols. It used to be you had 2 choices, the Remington XP100 or the T/C Contender. The Remington was a bolt action with the layout you describe.

                  In the late 70's Silhouette shooting was gaining in popularity, and Weatherby came out with the CFP series, and various models have been in continuous production ever since. Today Savage makes one called the Striker, and Remington has reintroduced the XP100 as the XP100R. But these pistols all have the action above the grip, not behind like old XP100.

                  If the bolt is behind the grip like you describe, I would guess you saw the HS Precision 2000. It has the layout of the old XP100, and you can get it in .308. The XP100's were only offered in varmint calibers, IIRC.
                  "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X