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Cruisers - how are they different from battleships?

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  • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
    I never even heard of an Asbestos Watch List. Is that for Naval Personnel? I remember making the rounds on the USS Leahy early in an overhaul and in the crew's head, first deck around frame 32, where three sailors tearing insulation off the pipes. It was asbestos so I shut the space down. They sent these sailors to the dispensary and subjected them to every test they could think of. I think they were more interested in covering the butt of the guy who ordered them to do the job.
    Yup, most steam engineers are on it because they were always finding asbestos all over the spaces. So much of it was used when those ships were new; especially if built in the 50s or very early-60s; and if you were a BT or a guy like me who was a boiler inspector, you were going to run across a lot of it in the fire box of a boiler. Other things will get you put on it as well; like Cellulube; the hydraulic fluid used in the aircraft elevator systems in the aircraft carriers. I owned them too; so I'm a double winner.

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    • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
      Yup, most steam engineers are on it because they were always finding asbestos all over the spaces. So much of it was used when those ships were new; especially if built in the 50s or very early-60s; and if you were a BT or a guy like me who was a boiler inspector, you were going to run across a lot of it in the fire box of a boiler. Other things will get you put on it as well; like Cellulube; the hydraulic fluid used in the aircraft elevator systems in the aircraft carriers. I owned them too; so I'm a double winner.
      Actually I was finding asbestos on ships built in the late 70's. The contractors would put it on the inside layer of the double layer insulations like the ones you'd find on main and aux steam.

      You can live with asbestosis, you might even have it. Mesothelioma can show up in a person's body even if they've have limited asbestos exposure.

      Since about the age of eight, I've been around and had my hands on and it asbestos, acetone, MEK, toulene, tri-chlor, red lead and so many other things, but last I checked my kidneys hadn't rotted out yet.

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      • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
        Actually I was finding asbestos on ships built in the late 70's. The contractors would put it on the inside layer of the double layer insulations like the ones you'd find on main and aux steam.

        You can live with asbestosis, you might even have it. Mesothelioma can show up in a person's body even if they've have limited asbestos exposure.

        Since about the age of eight, I've been around and had my hands on and it asbestos, acetone, MEK, toulene, tri-chlor, red lead and so many other things, but last I checked my kidneys hadn't rotted out yet.
        Yeah, I'm fine too, and not losing any sleep. They just take a look at me every once in a while. I rather doubt I'm going to croak from that any time soon. I have other physical problems from my 25 years of service that are far more pressing and debilitating. Like the fact that I need both hips and knees replaced. I used to run . . . a lot. Even at sea on a frigate. 17.5 times around the helo flight deck and hanger is one mile. I'd run a 10K doing that; switching directions every mile so that I'd get equal wear on my hips from leaning inboard. If we really rolling it was especially important to lean inboard. I need several vertebrae fused too. Anyway, I have trouble walking from my bed to the head these days, and that's why. I teach online now because it doesn't require any standing or moving around like teaching in the classroom did.

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        • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
          Even at sea on a frigate. 17.5 times around the helo flight deck and hanger is one mile.
          Like on the Brooke? I would have guessed that equaled 1/4 mile. Seriously. Rarely spent any time in the area unless it was working in a fan room in the hangar.

          The problem with being middle-aged is that I don't know if I'd have the same pains even if I wouldn't have spent a significant time in a shipyard.
          Last edited by Ytlas; 15 Jun 13,, 16:07.

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          • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
            Like on the Brooke? I would have guessed that equaled 1/4 mile. Seriously. Rarely spent any time in the area unless it was working in a fan room in the hangar.

            The problem with being middle-aged is that I don't know if I'd have the same pains even if I wouldn't have spent a significant time in a shipyard.
            Nah, on Brooke, you'd have had to run the main deck, which included the helo deck. I didn't do that simply because people were always opening doors and stepping out onto the deck. I did the exer-cycle and rowing machine at sea in Brooke. Same story on the cruiser. I tried it a few times, but I hate having to be that aware. It sort of interferes with the so called "runner's high." I waited till we pulled in to run. I'd run the helo deck and hanger on the Knox-class. No doors for anyone to step out of; just a fueling probe on each side to be mindful of.

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            • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
              Nah, on Brooke, you'd have had to run the main deck, which included the helo deck. I didn't do that simply because people were always opening doors and stepping out onto the deck. I did the exer-cycle and rowing machine at sea in Brooke. Same story on the cruiser. I tried it a few times, but I hate having to be that aware. It sort of interferes with the so called "runner's high." I waited till we pulled in to run. I'd run the helo deck and hanger on the Knox-class. No doors for anyone to step out of; just a fueling probe on each side to be mindful of.
              Did a lot of work on Knox class, mostly the six that were overhauled in Long Beach prior to be given to Taiwan. We rarely saw any work above the main deck, except for going inside the "Mack" or whatever it was called and all the way up to the top to fasten insulation pads. I can remember going down to the lower level of the fireroom when the boilers were lit and I couldn't find anyone around. I decided at that time I needed a coffee on the pier. I saw three sailors in the corner with their hands down each other's pants and giggling. That type of behavior was very common with the enlisted on the six ships I worked on.

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              • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
                Did a lot of work on Knox class, mostly the six that were overhauled in Long Beach prior to be given to Taiwan. We rarely saw any work above the main deck, except for going inside the "Mack" or whatever it was called and all the way up to the top to fasten insulation pads. I can remember going down to the lower level of the fireroom when the boilers were lit and I couldn't find anyone around. I decided at that time I needed a coffee on the pier. I saw three sailors in the corner with their hands down each other's pants and giggling. That type of behavior was very common with the enlisted on the six ships I worked on.
                Never saw that kind of thing. I knew who the gay people were though. Kind of difficult not to. However, don't ask, don't tell.

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                • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
                  Never saw that kind of thing. I knew who the gay people were though. Kind of difficult not to. However, don't ask, don't tell.
                  It was so bad on these ships that no yardbird wanted to walk into isolated compartments for fear of what they might see. One machinst who went out on sea trial said it was fairly common for sailors to share the same rack for comfort. I really don't care what they do as long as I don't see it or as long as it doesn't become a danger.

                  Wasn't really sure about the officers' dedication either. One night on graveyard I went up on the port catwalk by the bridge and there were two officers (I think) squatting, each with a cigarette in one hand and passing a bottle of Cognac back and forth.

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                  • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
                    It was so bad on these ships that no yardbird wanted to walk into isolated compartments for fear of what they might see. One machinst who went out on sea trial said it was fairly common for sailors to share the same rack for comfort. I really don't care what they do as long as I don't see it or as long as it doesn't become a danger.

                    Wasn't really sure about the officers' dedication either. One night on graveyard I went up on the port catwalk by the bridge and there were two officers (I think) squatting, each with a cigarette in one hand and passing a bottle of Cognac back and forth.
                    Sounds like the DESRON commander had some command climate issues. The only drinking I was ever aware of was the Airedales in Constellation who often self-medicated after long periods of air ops when we were deployed for 10 months, twice, during the Iranian hostage crises. There was a real problem with the rest of the enlisted crew, some members of which brewed their own poison. A large pickle jar, some fruit juice, and a package of baker's yeast was all that you needed. A lot of the crew got very drunk, and occasionally very sick, drinking that stuff.

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                    • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
                      Sounds like the DESRON commander had some command climate issues. The only drinking I was ever aware of was the Airedales in Constellation who often self-medicated after long periods of air ops when we were deployed for 10 months, twice, during the Iranian hostage crises. There was a real problem with the rest of the enlisted crew, some members of which brewed their own poison. A large pickle jar, some fruit juice, and a package of baker's yeast was all that you needed. A lot of the crew got very drunk, and occasionally very sick, drinking that stuff.
                      In the yards I never ran across any alcohol on U.S. ships. On the Australian ships they were allowed two cans of Olympia beer daily. For some American sailors they resorted to huffing the old TempCo-brand "Nut Buster" or Anchor Adhesive. The Anchor Adhesive was thickened toluene (airplane glue). We even had trouble keeping the stuff away from our temporary employees. The mess cooks used Nut Buster to kill cockroaches so I don't know why anyone would want to huff that stuff even though it had a nice smell.

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                      • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
                        In the yards I never ran across any alcohol on U.S. ships. On the Australian ships they were allowed two cans of Olympia beer daily. For some American sailors they resorted to huffing the old TempCo-brand "Nut Buster" or Anchor Adhesive. The Anchor Adhesive was thickened toluene (airplane glue). We even had trouble keeping the stuff away from our temporary employees. The mess cooks used Nut Buster to kill cockroaches so I don't know why anyone would want to huff that stuff even though it had a nice smell.
                        No idea. I could wait till we hit the beach. Actually, I don't drink much since 1986. Kind of tried to drink all there was when I was a student at SWOSCOLCOM Department Head course. I found that there was always more to drink. So while I didn't stop altogether, I changed my attitude on that front. I will have a couple socially and that's it.

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                        • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
                          Yeah, I'm fine too, and not losing any sleep. They just take a look at me every once in a while. I rather doubt I'm going to croak from that any time soon. I have other physical problems from my 25 years of service that are far more pressing and debilitating. Like the fact that I need both hips and knees replaced. I used to run . . . a lot. Even at sea on a frigate. 17.5 times around the helo flight deck and hanger is one mile. I'd run a 10K doing that; switching directions every mile so that I'd get equal wear on my hips from leaning inboard. If we really rolling it was especially important to lean inboard. I need several vertebrae fused too. Anyway, I have trouble walking from my bed to the head these days, and that's why. I teach online now because it doesn't require any standing or moving around like teaching in the classroom did.
                          Everyone I've known has packed on the pounds after they quit running, so running really can't be that great in the long run... There was a pro bowler who once stated (as I remember), "I don't run if I can walk. I don't walk if I can stand. I don't stand if I can sit. I don't sit if I can lay." I'm laying here right now typing this.

                          I came out of this mess ok. Have two bad knees (one from high school) which very rarely bother me. My lungs apparently still are clear. I have "Trigger finger" on each hand and nerve damage, but I've also never been middle aged before. My hearing is excellent. During the shipyard closure physical, the doctor asked me three times if I was sure I worked on the ships for 20 years. I'm glad I saved my hearing so I can hear the constant "Boom, boom, boom" music of all these dimwits trying to develop tinnitus.

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                          • Originally posted by Ytlas View Post
                            Everyone I've known has packed on the pounds after they quit running, so running really can't be that great in the long run... There was a pro bowler who once stated (as I remember), "I don't run if I can walk. I don't walk if I can stand. I don't stand if I can sit. I don't sit if I can lay." I'm laying here right now typing this.

                            I came out of this mess ok. Have two bad knees (one from high school) which very rarely bother me. My lungs apparently still are clear. I have "Trigger finger" on each hand and nerve damage, but I've also never been middle aged before. My hearing is excellent. During the shipyard closure physical, the doctor asked me three times if I was sure I worked on the ships for 20 years. I'm glad I saved my hearing so I can hear the constant "Boom, boom, boom" music of all these dimwits trying to develop tinnitus.
                            Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for my hearing. It's shot too. I wore hearing protection, usually, but sometimes to hear things properly, like a spindle bearing on a lube oil purifier eating itself, you have to pull your mouse ears off and really listen. Add to the the airplanes that landed on my roof for three years; the "shirts" on the flight deck dropping chocks and chains on my roof; the general noise of vent fans and all like that; the crack of 5" guns (and trust me, they hurt more than a 16" in my opinion, any day. The 16" "boom," which is kind of nice. Those 5" rifles are like a .30-06 on steroids. A real nasty "crack" that ratchets your jaws down tight); and all the noise attendant to two major overhauls, including dry docking, plus all the time I spent in shipyards with the PEB doing light off exams on various ships, and I have lost basically my mid-range hearing. What does that mean? Well, if we met face to face, you probably wouldn't notice anything initially . . . until you caught me reading your lips. I used to tell my high school students when I was teaching history for six years not to be offended if I was staring intently at their faces when they were asking me questions; I just needed to make sure that what I thought I was hearing was indeed what they were saying. They were pretty good sports about it. Actually, I loved teaching those kids; it was just the assholes (Can I say that? If not, just tell me and it won't happen again) in the administration I couldn't stand. A bunch of petty, political nonsense and no gonads on their part into the bargain. They weren't worth the powder it would have taken to blow them away. Shall I tell you how I really feel?

                            Anyway, I don't hear well, but I don't wear hearing aids . . . yet.

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                            • Wow, this thread has strayed! Have to say I never saw any activities like that on my ship, although there were rumors once in a while. I knew of a few guys who would sneak booze onboard for long cruises or even pot which they would sit in the aft intake plenum (spruance class) and smoke but it wasn't widespread and it was mostly old-timers. (this was the 80's and by oldtimers I mean 60's-70's sailors) Most of them were Vietnam vets who had health issues and were self medicating. Good guys though who did their jobs and were reliable. Back to cruisers though. When we would go up the James river to the yards, there was an old heavy cruiser that I used to see tied up pierside on the opposite side from the yard piers. Long gone now, probably 1986-87 last time I saw her. Any ideas what ship this might have been?

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                              • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
                                Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for my hearing. It's shot too. I wore hearing protection, usually, but sometimes to hear things properly, like a spindle bearing on a lube oil purifier eating itself, you have to pull your mouse ears off and really listen. Add to the the airplanes that landed on my roof for three years; the "shirts" on the flight deck dropping chocks and chains on my roof; the general noise of vent fans and all like that; the crack of 5" guns (and trust me, they hurt more than a 16" in my opinion, any day. The 16" "boom," which is kind of nice. Those 5" rifles are like a .30-06 on steroids.
                                Of course this string has strayed, they all do when I participate.....

                                I'd use hearing plugs and then the aural protectors if it was really loud. Like working forward on a Leahy or Belknap in the emergency forward gas turbine generator space with the Equipment Cleaners operating the heavy deck grinders right above us taking off the non skid. I stood on the aft Tomahawk deck and watched the New Jersey test fire it's aft 16" guns. Didn't seem that loud, but the concussion would raise the collar of my jacket each shot. Few times I worked in a ship at the water line or below and there would be a ship at the SAC site pinging sonar. Ear plugs never helped then. I can remember being home all weekend "Hearing" the pinging sequences.

                                Did you know Admiral Prout III well? He was the only admiral I almost met. I was working on the John Young (I think) on a Sunday when I heard "USS Carl Vinson Battlegroup, arriving." I just knew that meant admiral, but since I was in #1MMR putting insulation pads on the waste heat boiler I figured I'd avoid him. After a while I look up and there's the admiral standing there watching me work. He gave me a big friendly smile and walked away without saying a word. It was only a few days later he was in the plane crash. Later that week a co-worker pointed out the flag on the fantail flying at half staff. We had no idea why the flag was that way. I couldn't find any information until a couple of months later when I received the "Proceedings" magazine. I remember he was wearing a pair of those (I considered) ugly bluish gray coveralls that I'd seen a lot of you PEB people wear. :)

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