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  • DocHayes
    replied
    My two favorite parts: lighting the boilers and watching the bow of the Mo crash into the waves.

    During my visits to the USS North Carolina, I often sat on the bridge, looking at both forward turrets, imagining what it would have looked like from there to be haze gray and underway. The size of those ships never ceases to amaze me.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    The Nevada's entire SHP output is just about 1/2 the SHP on one screw of the Iowas which are 53,000 shp each.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 27 Oct 12,, 22:02.

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  • USSWisconsin
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
    Yeah, I had to look at that again, I have Nevada at approx 26,500 SHP since she had geared turbines instead of the reciprocating machinery that Oklahoma had at the time and 12 of the smaller Yarrow boilers. She also ran heavy bunker "c" fuel unlike the 80's upgraded Iowas running distiliate fuels. Faster response times and less heating time on the machinery.
    Wikipedia had 24,800 though I'm sure you used a better source, I was lazy... Nevada had North Dakota's turbines, they replaced her originals in 1931. North Dakota was rated for 21 knots, but weighed about 7500 tons less, and Nevada had been sitting around in tropical waters, building up marine growth for a while and had a lot of extra weight added in the 1930's (she did 20.5 on trials with her original machinery - which was newer than the ND machinery). I had read somewhere that she was in the slow wing which travelled at a best speed of 18 knots as a group - with her reciprocating machinery sister, Oklahoma, being the slowest.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    Originally posted by USSWisconsin View Post
    Flank speed for USS Nevada would have been around 19 knots by late 1941, and she had a little less than 25,000 SHP about a tenth of what an Iowa might make with emergency overload - Iowa might even have pulled that off (with hot boilers).
    Yeah, I had to look at that again, I have Nevada at approx 26,500 SHP since she had geared turbines instead of the reciprocating machinery that Oklahoma had at the time and 12 of the smaller Yarrow boilers. She also ran heavy bunker "c" fuel unlike the 80's upgraded Iowas running distiliate fuels. Faster response times and less heating time on the machinery.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    Dunno about that...he protested the orders to begin with and was probably scared out of his mind the entire time. :red:
    Probably because we could very well be talking about Smedberg in the same way we talk about William D. Brown.
    Well, look at Jimmy Holloway and his radical manuvering of the ships at times. There are also others that have tested the reaction time and manuverability in closer confinments such as entering drydock and tearing through a battle group in the opposite direction to loop around and be on station. I dont think the captain would show any worries but the helmsman and navigator is a completely different story.

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  • USSWisconsin
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
    One further about handling in the harbor (not scifi) Consider Nevada got underway under "hot iron" her boilers warmed up. Two shafts with less then 1/4 of the Iowas SHP and approx 6' less draft at full displacement. 1 rudder. The Iowas, 4 shafts, 4 times the SHP, 2 massive rudders, deeper in draft and longer but by far move manuverable. There are several images of the Pearl Harbor BB's together during drills, in very close proximity.

    An area alot smaller then Pearl Harbor.

    And from what is told the Iowas at full displacement (before retirement) would have 5'-0" and sometimes less in most US ports they visited, New York, Philly etc.


    *TH, he followed his orders but I bet he did so with a BIG smile.
    Flank speed for USS Nevada would have been around 19 knots by late 1941, and she had a little less than 25,000 SHP about a tenth of what an Iowa might make with emergency overload - Iowa might even have pulled that off (with hot boilers).

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
    *TH, he followed his orders but I bet he did so with a BIG smile.
    Dunno about that...he protested the orders to begin with and was probably scared out of his mind the entire time. :red:
    Probably because we could very well be talking about Smedberg in the same way we talk about William D. Brown.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    One further about handling in the harbor (not scifi) Consider Nevada got underway under "hot iron" her boilers warmed up. Two shafts with less then 1/4 of the Iowas SHP and approx 6' less draft at full displacement. 1 rudder. The Iowas, 4 shafts, 4 times the SHP, 2 massive rudders, deeper in draft and longer but by far move manuverable. There are several images of the Pearl Harbor BB's together during drills, in very close proximity.

    An area alot smaller then Pearl Harbor.

    And from what is told the Iowas at full displacement (before retirement) would have 5'-0" and sometimes less in most US ports they visited, New York, Philly etc.


    *TH, he followed his orders but I bet he did so with a BIG smile.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 26 Oct 12,, 22:49.

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
    Well, I can recall reading about the Iowa under Capt Smedberg during machinery trials tearing around Alcatraz Island (San Fransico Bay) and the Golden Gate Bridge twice with all of the fast moving currents at 20+knots.
    A bit of trivia about that speed run...
    Captain Smedberg had apparently been ordered to do the trials in the Bay, over his protests.

    Unbeknownst to him, watching was Chester Nimitz, who called him afterwards and admonished him for handling such large and valuable warship in such confined and dangerous waters.

    Smedberg replied that he'd been ordered to do so, but Nimitz countered that he should've refused the order.

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  • Ytlas
    replied
    Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
    An interesting thought though, Nevada sortied as fast as she could to escape the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor with alot more obsticles namely, the other moored ships that morning and the dredge.
    There was a Leahy class or Belknap class CG that was speeding out of Pearl Harbor and put a gash in the hull and promptly needed drydocking. I used to remember the name of the ship and did look it up, but the name escapes me. Not good to go speeding around inside the harbor.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisV71 View Post
    The Flank Speed in Pearl Harbor cracked me up. The ship would run hard aground before they could go anywhere...
    An interesting thought though, Nevada sortied as fast as she could to escape the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor with alot more obsticles namely, the other moored ships that morning and the dredge.

    Although, Missouri would never achieve flank speed that quickly, the distance around Ford Island could be navigated rather quickly until the turn at Hospital Point.

    A map to show Nevada's location.
    map of pearl harbor

    A map to show Missouri's location:
    Pearl Harbor Maps, Location, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Pure science fiction I know but just a thought.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 25 Oct 12,, 23:13.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    Well, I can recall reading about the Iowa under Capt Smedberg during machinery trials tearing around Alcatraz Island (San Fransico Bay) and the Golden Gate Bridge twice with all of the fast moving currents at 20+knots.

    Grant it that Pearl Harbor is more shallower but does not see the currents that the Bay does.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 24 Oct 12,, 22:54.

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  • Ytlas
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisV71 View Post
    The Flank Speed in Pearl Harbor cracked me up. The ship would run hard aground before they could go anywhere...
    I liked that scene also. Little ambitious since they were still at the pier. I can only remember watching one ship leaving the pier without assistance of tugs.

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by DonBelt View Post
    Lack of reality wasn't the point- the point was after everyone I've ever met that worked on a museum ship, everyone I read on this board and endless conversations with my former shipmates, seeing the way the docents and crew members on the Missouri came out of the woodwork ready to bring the ship back to life struck a chord with me. Dumb story or not, realistic in its portrayal of how the ships work or not- who hasn't thought about bringing their old ship back for one last cruise?
    I have to say, that was some damn good film making right there. The engineering guy ticking off all the problems with using the Missouri, including his lack of manpower...and the camera keeps cutting to the former crew, silently standing like ghosts, just waiting for the characters to catch up with the audience.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    The boilers would not come up to steam that quickly from a cold light off. It takes several hours to raise steam from being cold and all during this time you are treating water for the boilers make up etc and all systems and piping that needs warming first or things tend to break if they are cold. The light off torch etc is correct though although minus the safety shroud..

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