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  • +2 Top!

    Hey desert this isn't a BB question but it fits, in your opinion what is a better alternative to steam plants now? Obviously GTs are great but I seem to recall a certain convo we had before and you weren't very impressed today's "engineers"on GTs :D. Just curious, if only they could make a big naval version of a new LT1!


    Let's hold off on the answer until Zumwalt is "under way, making way" for the first time. I believe in my heart that variations of her all electric propulsion and electrical power distribution plant fed by some combination of LM2500, MT30 and/or diesel generation, driving either jet pumps a la the LCS or AZIPODs like HMS Queen Elizabeth is the wave of the future, but until I see "Agent Orange" on the move I'll withhold comment.

    I will say this though; give me USS Gerald R. Ford's reactors, steam generators, SSTGs, and electrical distribution system, coupled with either LCS jet pumps or QE's, AZIPODs and you'll catch me with a raging engineering hard on! :)

    I was very upset when GRF's designers didn't take that leap of faith and give her electric drive like QE. No balls, no blue chips. :(

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    • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
      Let's hold off on the answer until Zumwalt is "under way, making way" for the first time. I believe in my heart that variations of her all electric propulsion and electrical power distribution plant fed by some combination of LM2500, MT30 and/or diesel generation, driving either jet pumps a la the LCS or AZIPODs like HMS Queen Elizabeth is the wave of the future, but until I see "Agent Orange" on the move I'll withhold comment.
      I'm reading Ghost Fleet by P. W. Singer and August Cole right now. It takes place several years from now and interestingly enough, in the beginning of that book, Zumwalt is laid up in Suisun Bay and described as a failure with her two sisters having been scrapped incomplete. I'll be curious how the real one performs.

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      • Originally posted by ArmorPiercing88 View Post
        Why didn't the navy replace the 5 inchers with the modern type turrets they were using on other ships at the time, like the Ticos? Would have dramatically reduced manpower needs, right?

        BTW visited the New Jersey today. Very cool being aboard, but bummed that more things below deck weren't available, like on the North Carolian.
        Perhaps I can explain the differences between Gun Turrets and Gun Mounts. Take a close look at the diagrams desertswo put on this thread. Absolutely perfect descriptions of the difference.

        The foundation of a Gun Turret is built as part of the ships hull structure because of the weight of the turrent and the amount of recoil shock tranfering on down and then dispersed through the ships hull.

        A Gun Mount, on the other hand, only goes as far down through its Upper Handling Room and is welded to the deck. It is not part of the ship's structure but a weapons system attached to the weather deck.

        Army and Marine Battle tanks, however, describe their gun housing as a "Turret" which is not quite correct. A tank turret is merely "mounted" on the hull of a tank via its roller path or traversing ring. A little confusing to some people as much of a tank's components use Naval nomenclature for their description. The main body of the tank that holds the crew, contains the engine and allows a turret to be attached to it is called the "HULL". Any stowage (or manned as in WW I) "compartments" mounted or welded to the sides of the hull are called "SPONSONS". The front of the tank hull is called the "BOW". Therefore in some of the tanks designed before the Korean War that had a crewman manning a machine gun to the right of the tank driver was called a "BOW GUNNER"

        This all comes from the British Navy who shipped the first tanks to inter WW-I were built by the British NAVY. Their track design was a result of such promising off-road travel when Winston Churchill witnessed a demonstration of the American built HOLT TRACTOR. Every military service was involved in developing the first full tracked tanks. The British Navy built them for the British Army and the first tank driver to test them was a pilot from the Royal Air Force.

        Umm, no. We did refrain from identifying the sides of a tank hull as Port or Starboard. After all, most of them were not built to float like a boat.
        Last edited by RustyBattleship; 04 Sep 15,, 18:56.
        Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

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        • ^^^

          What he said!!! :)

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          • DSWO wrote:
            Anyway, a lot of those guys who man those 5/38s would be there anyway because someone has to buff the tile outside the COs stateroom. I bet bbvet knows exactly what Im talking about.
            Oh, jeez!! How could I forget??? The BUFFER was the MOST important piece of equipment on the ship. One simply did NOT attempt to visit any berthing area or passageway during or after Morning Quarters when the BUFFER was in operation!!! It surprises me that the Navy did not have a designated rate for this important job - say a BFSN, or BF3!

            But, DSWO is correct in that the Watch, Quarter, & Station Bill was the guide to where everyone was assigned during any shipboard evolution - and it could be anywhere on the ship, regardless of your "job" (MOS to grunts). As an example, on my first ship, a FLETCHER class DD - USS STODDARD (DD-566) for my General Quarters billet, I was assigned to Mt. 33 as a 2nd loader and before the end of our 66-67 cruise, moved to 1st loader. I was also on the Away Boarding Party manning a BAR. This was due to starting out in 1st Division (deck gang), not the fact that I moved on to the ship's office and became a PN3 prior to transfer in '68. On NEW JERSEY the General Quarters billets were pretty much already assigned when I came aboard and I ended up getting a spot as a phone talker in a first aid station adjacent to Turret 3, below decks. I tried to get a Weapons Dept. GQ billet but the XO wouldn't hear of it, even after going to him personally with my prior DD combat experience. I think Ed Snyder (our CO) would have been ok with it, but I wasn't about to go higher than the XO; we got along well and I didn't want to push it. In later years, Capt. Snyder & I had a very good relationship - a wonderful person all the way around.

            Getting back to the topic (sort of) - after our 66-67 Westpac Cruise in STODDARD, when awards were handed out, our ship's barber got a Navy Commendation Medal for his role as a 5"/38 Mount Captain during one of our high-speed NGFS runs along the North Vietnamese coast. So, GMG's were not always the ones manning the mounts (or turrets).

            I also share DSWO's position that steam plant vessels are a thing of the past - too manpower intensive, dangerous, and costly - esp. with today's generation of questionable manpower (and I use the term "man"power very loosely) - NOT the Navy I would join, most assuredly.

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            • I don't know about you, but at OCS we used to sit on them and go for a ride! :D

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              • Like this?



                I'm impressed with the Navys buffer riding skills

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                • ^^

                  Well, HELL YA'!!!

                  You know, junior officers of the sea services have to be able to actually DO all sorts of reprehensible things before we can, with a straight face, tell young sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and Marines, "Kids, don't try this at home!!!"

                  I swear, those people at the academies spend four years studying the fine art of "Getting Over On The Chain of Command."
                  Last edited by desertswo; 08 Sep 15,, 01:01.

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                  • Originally posted by desertswo View Post
                    ^^

                    Well, HELL YA'!!!

                    You know, junior officers of the sea services have to be able to actually DO all sorts of reprehensible things before we can, with a straight face, tell young sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and Marines, "Kids, don't try this at home!!!"

                    I swear, those people at the academies spend four years studying the fine art of "Getting Over On The Chain of Command."
                    I think that's called "Cross Training" or is it "What ever works -- Do it." Fortunately many of them make very fine officers and at least rise up to the rank of a silver eagle on their lapels. Such as a certain retired Captain on this board we all know and highly respect.
                    Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

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                    • Originally posted by RustyBattleship View Post
                      I think that's called "Cross Training" or is it "What ever works -- Do it." Fortunately many of them make very fine officers and at least rise up to the rank of a silver eagle on their lapels. Such as a certain retired Captain on this board we all know and highly respect.
                      I wonder how he would do in a pillow fight...?

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                      • Spin recovery .....

                        So this is how sailors learn to keep their cookies down at sea ......

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                        • Such as a certain retired Captain on this board we all know and highly respect.
                          I am going to "coin" a new phrase/title! What with all the work and effort that many so-called "retired" members of the services (yes, that includes you, Rusty) dive into after "so-called" retirement, it's time for one! (I think that was a run-on sentence!)
                          So, from here on we should be addressing certain individuals as "Ready Inactive"! Actually there should be no such thing as "retired" anymore! The class should be titled "Inactive Reserve"! That is until the "body hits the scrap heap"!
                          Yea, yea yea! I hear both of you already! "I'm already in the scrap heap"!

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                          • Originally posted by SlaterDoc View Post
                            I am going to "coin" a new phrase/title! What with all the work and effort that many so-called "retired" members of the services (yes, that includes you, Rusty) dive into after "so-called" retirement, it's time for one! (I think that was a run-on sentence!)
                            So, from here on we should be addressing certain individuals as "Ready Inactive"! Actually there should be no such thing as "retired" anymore! The class should be titled "Inactive Reserve"! That is until the "body hits the scrap heap"!
                            Yea, yea yea! I hear both of you already! "I'm already in the scrap heap"!
                            So you have gone to the breakers to be dismantled.

                            Scrap heap is so beneath you.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by SlaterDoc View Post
                              I am going to "coin" a new phrase/title! What with all the work and effort that many so-called "retired" members of the services (yes, that includes you, Rusty) dive into after "so-called" retirement, it's time for one! (I think that was a run-on sentence!)
                              So, from here on we should be addressing certain individuals as "Ready Inactive"! Actually there should be no such thing as "retired" anymore! The class should be titled "Inactive Reserve"! That is until the "body hits the scrap heap"!
                              Yea, yea yea! I hear both of you already! "I'm already in the scrap heap"!
                              Oh did you ever hit the nail on the head. When you "retire" you should never just sit down in front of the TV, reorganize your family photo albums and have a gardener mow your lawn monthly.

                              Get up out of that recliner and DO something. Take me for example. Even before retiring I was already working with the ICPA to find homes for the Battleships. After retirement I went to work at a friend's cabinet shop. Repaneld my entire kitchen all by myself. Started a model train collection as a less physical hobby. Burned a lot of midnight oil developing the plans for finding a home for the Iowa. Wrote a book on the history of LBNSY. I'm not a cow pasture pool fan, but those of you who are just grab your clubs and take off for the Golf course once a week.
                              Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

                              Comment


                              • Broadway ???

                                This illustration is reportedly of the USS Missouri BB-63 taken during construction.
                                If so, is the area outlined in yellow the area known as "Broadway on an Iowa Class BB"?
                                Attached Files

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