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  • Now, if I was Iowa's Corpsman you'd be on my "Special Attention" list!
    If you are going for stents, just make sure they give you the "extended lifetime guarantee"!
    I didn't! Although mine were not included on the recall and it's been 9 years with no problems, you just can't trust that they weren't made in China these days! :confu:

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    • DesertSWO - Thanks for the information re. the disection of the after stack, etc. - wasn't exactly what I was needing to know, but does confirm the details of the stack as provided on my model.

      Ken_NJ - Thanks, but as my query states 1968 - this is the time period I'm concerned with, not the 82 refit.

      RustyB - First, I'm surprised you saw this - I thought you would already be "in the shop" undergoing repairs!!! Good luck with your procedure this week; let everything else go and worry about yourself! FYI, I am using your 82 photos you sent me of the NJ tied up to the pier in LB. They are very helpful, but due to the angle of one shot, the after stack's forward-most ladder is visible but it would be nice to have more upper detail. Ditto with the mag. compass platform. I will email you in a week or so, etc.

      SlaterDoc - In agreement 100%!! Also, your comment regarding the China connection - sadly, it's so true today. I see it everyday at work (in what's being purchased - CHEAP!).

      Hank

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      • Originally posted by SlaterDoc View Post
        Now, if I was Iowa's Corpsman you'd be on my "Special Attention" list!
        Back in the day, if a corpsman told you that he was putting you on his "Special Attention List", It normally meant that he was going to "Misplace" your shot record.

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        • Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
          Back in the day, if a corpsman told you that he was putting you on his "Special Attention List", It normally meant that he was going to "Misplace" your shot record.
          Back in my day, there were two lists!
          One where the record got "misplaced" and ......
          one where the shot got "misplaced"!

          My how things change though!
          Now-a-days, with us having all this gray hair (or no more hair) there is a new rating for the Med Dept!
          GHM = Geriatric Hospitalman!

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          • Well, today was the first day in months I was able to walk without a cane at the ready and the first day in months I was able to lift my left foot off the floor by itself and actually strut into the kitchen for my morning cup of coffee.

            The "procedure" they did on my yesterday was disappointing at first because everybody else told me I would walk out of the surgery center. Not so unless it was with a walker. Fortunately we had one at home as well.

            But after a certain --- umm --- how can I say this delicately ---- internal waste disposal, I felt it safe enough then to take a pain pill and had a real good night's sleep. I even did some shopping today but heeding the doctor's advice that it will take one to two weeks before I'm completely back in shape and the rubber baby buggy bumpers (say THAT fast 3 times) they put in between my tail bones have settled in I still used the handicap electric cart.

            Besides, they're fun to drive and remind me a little of my M-41A1 tank especially when I do a 180 in an aisleway.

            I'll be back to help (or bug) you guys again BUT, I'm going to my model train club meeting tonight. I've missed several because of other commitees and tonight's theme is electric and/or unconventionally powered (gas engine) trains. And I have a Milwaukee Road Doodlebug to show off.
            Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

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            • rubber baby buggy bumpers they put in between my tail bones
              Now you can bounce back even faster! Especially if you hit Iowa's deck, stern first! :Dancing-Banana:

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              • RustyB,

                Glad to hear you're on the mend! Lower back pain is the worst - I hope the procedure performed lasts a long time and you're back aboard where you belong!!

                Hank

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                • Glad to hear everything is going well Rusty
                  RIP Charles "Bob" Spence. 1936-2014.

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                  • I too am glad to hear you are on the mend Rusty.
                    Hope to seen you aboard the Iowa soon.
                    I sure enjoyed your last lecture on the Iowa's armor plating.
                    Craig Johnson

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                    • Great Report ......

                      Mr. L it is great to hear that all is working itself out of or in to the correct location.
                      My very best wishes.

                      FYI ( I am a CRI&P RR person myself in both O & HO, through I was a gandy on the MoP one summer during college )
                      Seems RRs and SHIPs must have something in common ?

                      Keep healing !

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                      • Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
                        Mr. L it is great to hear that all is working itself out of or in to the correct location.
                        My very best wishes.

                        FYI ( I am a CRI&P RR person myself in both O & HO, through I was a gandy on the MoP one summer during college )
                        Seems RRs and SHIPs must have something in common ?

                        Keep healing !
                        Thanks to all of you. And yes, Railroads and Ships (prior to nuclear & diesel) do have something in common. They are the most perfect examples of combining STEEL with STEAM and look powerful enough as well.

                        Okay. I confess. I do have a couple of diesel locos for the MILW RR but most are steam. Well, except for my Bi-Polar which is all brass and my wife paid 500 bucks for it to give to me. I opened the box the other day and the crappy sponge rubber deteriorated and has left the engine looking crappy. We will need to go to another forum for this, but I need to know how to clean it up.

                        Well, gotta do something before my Orthopedist will let me go back aboard the Iowa. Did get the go ahead this morning from my Cardiologist -- for a couple of months anyway.
                        Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

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                        • Get well Rusty, and thank you for all the patience you have given me over the years!

                          Shadow01

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                          • Got another question, this time about the (modernized) Queen Elizabeth class's torpedo protection. From what I'm able to find out, it consisted of I 'think' 2 void? compartments for sure, separated by the double bottom, completely unclear if there's two plates with a space there or not, followed by a 2 inch/50mm holding bulkhead, 16 feet total depth. The outermost 5 feet are in an external bulge, for whatever's it worth. Inside of the armored bulkhead is (I 'think') a single large fuel oil tank, around 14 feet deep. Total depth is either 16 feet void-void-2" bulkhead, or 30 feet void-void-armored bulkhead-liquid-(completely unreinforced? bulkhead). Not the most impressive system, although I'd love to be wrong on any of the details, that would likely make the system stronger.

                            I'm wondering how that compares in terms of effectiveness to the Scharnhorst's 14 ft void-liquid-armored bulkhead, or the KGV's 13 ft void-(really narrow liquid layer)-void-armored bulkhead system. Machinery spaces behind them in both cases. The brits rated the KGV's against a 1000 lb warhead; considering that much better systems were rated lower by just about every other country, I feel it's rather obvious it's nowhere near that good. They also rated the QE's against a 700 lb warhead, but I suspect that's rather high.

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                            • For Rusty -

                              I'm curious as to whether or not NEW JERSEY gained or lost overall tonnage in her 1981-82 refit. Was a determination made by LBNSYD as to total weight reduction from removal vs any weight gain (if any) from the modernization and addition of the various missile systems, magazines, electronics, etc.? I would surmize that this calculation would obviously have effected her overall trim and underway performance.

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                              • Originally posted by bbvet View Post
                                For Rusty -

                                I'm curious as to whether or not NEW JERSEY gained or lost overall tonnage in her 1981-82 refit. Was a determination made by LBNSYD as to total weight reduction from removal vs any weight gain (if any) from the modernization and addition of the various missile systems, magazines, electronics, etc.? I would surmize that this calculation would obviously have effected her overall trim and underway performance.
                                There was definitely a weight gain. I have the data report from our Scientific Design Section somewhere around here. But I can give you the basic numbers.

                                The heaviest weights we REMOVED were four 5"/38 twin gun mounts at 85 tons each for a total of 340 tons. Their ammunition magazines down on the 3rd deck were converted into Air Conditioning Machinery rooms so the weight varied very little one way or the other. Without looking up any photos or plans, we removed all 40mm gun shields which were 5/8" thick STS armor (which was 3/4" thick on BB's 63 & 64) which was about 18 to 20 tons of steel. Both fore and aft masts were removed and replaced with a large Tripod Mast. The boat and airplane crane on the fantail was also removed and its machinery room became the compartment for the Nixie Winch. The catapults were already removed from all ships after the Korean War as we did not have any use for that type of airplane anymore.

                                Now, I can't give you the weights of the various machinery we installed because my job was to concentrate on structural integrity and armor plating. But if you can find the manuals, we added (1) twin drum NIXIE winch for torpedo decoys, (1) Boat Handling Boom with winches on the port side aft, a Refueling At Sea kingpost on the stbd side, (8) York Air Conditioning plants, new electronic receivers and repeaters for the new RADAR antennas, (8) Tomahawk Armored Box Launchers, (16) armored Harpoon tubes and converted some crew and officer quarters into electronic or command spaces well protected with new armor plate above, bellow and all sides.

                                My initial calculations for an Advance Material List for all new structures called for 400 tons of Ordinary Strength Steel plate and Tee Bar framing. The list was then topped off with 400 tons of HY-80 armor plate of various thicknesses from 1/4" to 1 1/2".

                                All in all we removed perhaps 500 tons of "equipment" from the ship which was replaced with at least 800 tons of steel and perhaps another 200 to 300 tons of weapons and electronics.
                                Able to leap tall tales in a single groan.

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