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  • Recheck the division of your hand calculator. 388'-0"/48=8'-1" for overall length and 72'-3"/48=1'-6". Still a pretty good size model. One of the other members of this forum builds fiberglass hulls for model builders of similar ships but mostly in 1:96 scale. I don't know if he has this one or not but you can punch up his website; Welcome to the Scale Shipyard.

    Thanks for the link, I've spoke with your friend previously. As noted most everything is 1:96. and his selection of USN battleships are WWII. Some beautiful models however.

    The 388' of Maine is @ waterline. Overall length was 394'
    Builders calc works just fine. :)


    Mick

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    • A few of Olympia while passing by. You will note in the stern shot that her aft turret has indeed been painted "Buff" instead of its original white as noted by Janes. I do have a clearer shot of the stern that I will post when I find it.
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      Last edited by Dreadnought; 15 Oct 11,, 20:59.
      Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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      • Engine room pic from the web. This is the starting platform.
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        Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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        • Her Commemmoration Tablet to the USS Maine. Made from metal recovered from USS Maine.
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          Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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          • There is something absolutely "poetic" about a triple-expansion engine. For a long time I had visions of building a functioning model of one of them. Actually for years I wanted to build live steam of any type, but just couldn't find my way both financially and space-wise to make it happen. So I've sublimated... RC, trains, ships... all kinds of stuff. Someday...

            I remember the first time I saw that engine and marveled at the ability of turn of the Century manufacturers to make a crankshaft as large as they are with the machines available at the time.

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            • Yes, they are amazing.
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              Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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              • These are the SS John Browns Triple Expansions. Still running to this day.
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                Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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                • Dreadnought, These are beautiful!

                  Thank you for posting!

                  There is something absolutely "poetic" about a triple-expansion engine. For a long time I had visions of building a functioning model of one of them. Actually for years I wanted to build live steam of any type, but just couldn't find my way both financially and space-wise to make it happen. So I've sublimated... RC, trains, ships... all kinds of stuff. Someday...

                  I would agree with the beginning of this statement, and understand completely the rest. :)


                  Mick

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                  • Dread, are the yellow lines running down the side of the connecting rods for lubricating oil?

                    BTW, found this really cool graphic of a triple-expansion engine on Wikipedia; this explains what it is to us non-naval types:

                    Last edited by Stitch; 16 Oct 11,, 05:17.
                    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

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                    • I believe those are pressure oil lines on the connecting rods- and that was a late addition to this type of engine - the earlier (19th century) engines didn't have forced lubrication - it first appeared on VTE dreadnoughts in the USN (in this timeframe - it may have been used on some other ships first). It looks like this engine still uses oil cups on the slide valve rods. The oilers on this ship would be busy.
                      sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
                      If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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                      • Originally posted by USSWisconsin View Post
                        I believe those are pressure oil lines on the connecting rods- and that was a late addition to this type of engine - the earlier (19th century) engines didn't have forced lubrication - it first appeared on VTE dreadnoughts in the USN (in this timeframe - it may have been used on some other ships first). It looks like this engine still uses oil cups on the slide valve rods. The oilers on this ship would be busy.
                        I figured it as some kind of drip lubrication line. I watched a program on TV and all a guy did on his watch was to oil on each revolution.

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                        • Yes, they are "bleed" lubrication lines however when I spoke with the Engineering head, he also relayed those red railings you see inbetween the rods are access for "manual" lubrication as well as maintenance. Yes, they actually had to reach into those engines while running in order top maintain them. These are the very same platforms used in the Titanic movie for the Engine room shot. This was the John Brown's engine spaces, Titanics footage comes from the Jerimiah O'Brien that is out on the West Coast. John Brown sails from Maryland.

                          Both of these ships still sail on a regular basis and a crew well schooled on their operation. Definately worth taking a cruise on one if you ever get the chance.
                          Last edited by Dreadnought; 16 Oct 11,, 19:58.
                          Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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                          • Triple expansion vs. stern wheeler..

                            Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
                            Yes, they are "bleed" lubrication lines however when I spoke with the Engineering head, he also relayed those red railings you see inbetween the rods are access for "manual" lubrication as well as maintenance. Yes, they actually had to reach into those engines while running in order top maintain them. These are the very same platforms used in the Titanic movie for the Engine room shot. This was the John Brown's engine spaces, Titanics footage comes from the Jerimiah O'Brien that is out on the West Coast. John Brown sails from Maryland.

                            Both of these ships still sail on a regular basis and a crew well schooled on their operation. Definately worth taking a cruise on one if you ever get the chance.
                            The maritime museum in Manitowac has a Triple Expansion on display which uses an electric drive to simulate the movement of a triple expansion steam engine.
                            Very nicely presented if you are ever in the neighborhood. A couple of weeks ago I was allowed into the engine room of the Belle of Louisville, a 1910 era stern wheeler. The boiler is now fired by oil and carries 190-lb of steam. The feed water pumps, connecting rods and poppet valves all had drip cups and the oilers were busy during the two-hour run on the Ohio while we stayed pleasantly warm. I imagine a hot steamy engine room of a Liberty ship in the South Pacific was not any cooler. ;)

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                            • As a Louisville resident, my wife and I are going to make a point of getting a ride. I didn't realize it was still steam driven until I read an article in the "What's Happening in Greater Louisville" events booklet.

                              My high school class trip ('63) was to Bear Mountain State Park up the Hudson River on a horizontally powered steam side-wheeler. I was an industrial arts major and this beautiful green, steel and brass machine was amazing. It was the best part of the trip.

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                              • I love ships engine rooms, they are one of my favorite things to look at - even better when they are in operation. The first one I ever saw was on the car ferry Milwaukee Clipper (got a peak during a trip across Lake Michigan with my family), I was very young (6 or 7) and was more impressed by the pipes, valves, ladders and gratings, so I barely remember the engines themselves, big dark machines as I recall them (they didn't let me get very close either). I do remember how noisy they were, quadruple expansion, single screw (learned this recently).
                                Last edited by USSWisconsin; 18 Oct 11,, 03:08.
                                sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
                                If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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