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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by RustyBattleship View Post
    First of all, which ship are you referring to?

    Secondly, are the gas bottles tall and slender or short and fat?

    Finally, what color are they?

    Oxygen is green. Acetylene is yellow. Red are CO2 fire extinguishers. Some "bottle looking" equipment are actually water pumps such as P125's and P250's should the ship be taking on water. Others are just normal compressed air or Nitrogen to fill inflatable life boats. If the deck area is back aft between the ablative shields of the aft Tomahawk Launchers, they could be Helium bottles for weather balloons that were launched from that area.

    I would have to see that photo to come up with a better "guess".

    Some may not be gas bottles at all but inert SRBOC rounds not installed on their launchers yet.
    Looking at the photo of the model in post 1533. they are mounted on the main deck between the 2 5 inch gun mounts.

    Did ships in WW 2 normally have these out on the weather decks?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • RustyBattleship
    replied
    Originally posted by Pacfanweb View Post
    Maybe a dumb question, or one asked before: Is New Jersey longer (7 inches, I read) than her 3 sisters?
    The only dumb question is the one that is never asked.

    At one time, the New Jersey was considered the (overall) longest Battleship. But that was changed later on when she and the Missouri had the forward 20 mm gun tubs cut off at the bow. Only the Iowa and Wisconsin have those gun tubs still in place. With their protrusion PLUS the wind venturi shields the Iowa is about 1 or 2 inches longer.

    It really doesn't make that much difference. Our biggest concern was fitting them through the Gatun Locks of the Panama Canal that repeatedly crinkled up our bilge keels in the curved bottom corners of the locks. I recall getting a phone call (when I was the Structural Configuration Manager in the 1980's) from the Canal "Authority" asking me what the radius of the bilge strakes were. I told them to consider them "square" because if you drew a straight line down the shell plating and a straight line across the bottom plating they would cross at the tip of the bilge keel. They said they do NOT take the bilge keels into configuration. So I took my architects scale out on a cross section of the ship in a booklet of general drawings and told them the bilge plating only had a 4-foot radius.

    Ooops. I used the wrong scale. It's an 8-foot radius. I used the wrong scale. You know how much time and cost it is to straighten out a crinkled up bilge keel made of 3/8' thick steel (top and bottom plates) riveted together and filled with Balsa Wood soaked in a 50/50 mix of Pitch & Coal Tar?

    Besides, I had two Battleships pierside within walking distance of my office and busy writing up my travel order report from inspecting one BB in Norfolk and collecting the plans I needed to carry to inspect another one in Philadelphia, it's easy to turn that triangular piece of wood the wrong way.

    But now there is a wider canal open in Panama now so it doesn't make any difference anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pacfanweb
    replied
    Maybe a dumb question, or one asked before: Is New Jersey longer (7 inches, I read) than her 3 sisters?

    Leave a comment:


  • RustyBattleship
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    BBVet & Rusty,

    A landlubbers question...in the photo of the superstructure there are a variety of gas bottles in the open on the deck.

    What are they for?

    And more importantly, are they a fire or explosion hazard? Were they there in WW 2 or were these a later installation?

    Thanks from a grunt!
    First of all, which ship are you referring to?

    Secondly, are the gas bottles tall and slender or short and fat?

    Finally, what color are they?

    Oxygen is green. Acetylene is yellow. Red are CO2 fire extinguishers. Some "bottle looking" equipment are actually water pumps such as P125's and P250's should the ship be taking on water. Others are just normal compressed air or Nitrogen to fill inflatable life boats. If the deck area is back aft between the ablative shields of the aft Tomahawk Launchers, they could be Helium bottles for weather balloons that were launched from that area.

    I would have to see that photo to come up with a better "guess".

    Some may not be gas bottles at all but inert SRBOC rounds not installed on their launchers yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    BBVet & Rusty,

    A landlubbers question...in the photo of the superstructure there are a variety of gas bottles in the open on the deck.

    What are they for?

    And more importantly, are they a fire or explosion hazard? Were they there in WW 2 or were these a later installation?

    Thanks from a grunt!

    Leave a comment:


  • RustyBattleship
    replied
    Originally posted by Pacfanweb View Post
    Question about all of the Iowa museums:

    Can the main turrets be traversed/rotated? I know it'd probably have to be done manually, but is it possible? They aren't disabled in any way, are they?

    What got me wondering was the Missouri's recent activities for the anniversary of the surrender. At the actual surrender, both forward turrets were turned to starboard a bit. I thought that'd be pretty neat if they replicated that for the commemoration. Didn't know if they could, though.

    Since the agreement with the Navy states that they have to be kept in the same condition they were received in, I'd think this would be possible.

    What does anyone (probably Rusty would be the most likely) know about this?

    Thanks
    The turrets can be manually operated at anytime we want. We had to do that with turret II on the Iowa to bring it to 0 degrees azimuth. Then the barrels can also be elevated or depressed manually. No problem except the gear reduction to traverse an 1800 ton turret or elevate a 118 ton gun barrel takes a LOOOOOONG time with relief operators standing by. A couple of cute girls standing by to massage the arms and shoulders would be okay too. If our wives approve.

    Technically the restrictions no longer apply to the Missouri or the New Jersey. So you can "fire up" the hydraulics to make it easier and faster. Actually, there are only 3 restrictions that still apply to the Iowa and Wisconsin. We cannot operate the CREW'S Galley (but we can reopen the Chief's galley, Officer's galley and Captain's galley). We cannot reactivate the Navigational systems (for Navigation). We cannot unlock the propeller shafts and reactivate the boilers and engine rooms for propulsion. Well, if we cannot move the ship, we can still activate the RADAR (not for navigation) but for early warnings of an incoming Tsunami. If we cannot turn the propellers, we could reactivate a boiler or two for heating (only) of the ship (but in Southern California that won't be necessary).

    The New Jersey has already installed a 16" shell hoist system (that works) and cut people accesses through the lower barbette and the turret foundation for visitors to see the stowage racks of 16" shells. I (as a Naval Architect and Armor specialist) don't like that, BUT if the cuts were done cleanly and the inserts well preserved, I know how to weld them back together.
    Last edited by RustyBattleship; 08 Sep 16,, 05:47.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pacfanweb
    replied
    Question about all of the Iowa museums:

    Can the main turrets be traversed/rotated? I know it'd probably have to be done manually, but is it possible? They aren't disabled in any way, are they?

    What got me wondering was the Missouri's recent activities for the anniversary of the surrender. At the actual surrender, both forward turrets were turned to starboard a bit. I thought that'd be pretty neat if they replicated that for the commemoration. Didn't know if they could, though.

    Since the agreement with the Navy states that they have to be kept in the same condition they were received in, I'd think this would be possible.

    What does anyone (probably Rusty would be the most likely) know about this?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • bigjimslade
    replied
    My information wish list

    Folks, this is my current wish list for Iowa class information to complete the computer model. It may seem like a long list but it is very short compared with what I started out with. Would anyone be interested in information sharing? I have over 1,600 photos of blueprints and microfilm. I also have a table of offsets in Excel as well as many other measurements.

    Any help on this wish list would be appreciated:
    • Heights of MK-37 Director Bases
    • Measurements for MK-37 Directors
    • Measurements for boat davits
    • Measurements for Armored Box Launchers
    • Measurements for Phalanx Guns
    • Measurements for Harpoon Launchers
    • Measurements for Stacks
    • Measurements for the NJ’s EW platforms on the main director tower (Have for MO/WI/IA)
    • Photo references showing the area behind the helicopter control booth (Plans show 6" between the back and the director tower. What is between? A gap? Filler?)
    • Photo references showing the area at the forward edge of the forward phalanx Platform (Plans show a circular step but I see nothing like that in distance photos)
    • Photo reference showing how the forward phalanx platform is supported.
    • Measurements of the hoods and periscopes on the 16 inch turrets (especially the range finder hoods).
    • Measurement for the bulwark on the NJ (Have for IA and WI)
    • Measurements of the Nixie Bolster.
    • Measurements of the Discone platform.
    • Measurements of antennas and platforms (e.g., those above the bridge and forward of the Tomahawk platform).
    • Measurements of the Roller Chock
    • Photoreference showing the bow chock as it meets the hull shell.
    • Measurements of the breakwater
    • Measurements of the “projection booth” at the stern.
    • Measurements of the SLQ-32
    • Measurements of the Bulwark around the boats on the NJ (or others)

    Leave a comment:


  • RustyBattleship
    replied
    Originally posted by bbvet View Post
    Sure hate to disagree with anyone, but the following photo of BB-64 in Norfolk may solve the question:

    [ATTACH]41936[/ATTACH]
    This also was a Google search. Don't see this on the other 3 IOWAs.

    Hank
    You got me. I should have expected that. I only had a 6 day inspection of "Wisky" when she was in dry dock in Philadelphia. Though I was selected as the Party Chief, I didn't stand around peering over the shoulders of the other engineers from LBNSY. I have a photo of me climbing the mast of the ship named after my home State on my birthday.

    But BB-64 had a few things added to her that were to be added to her other sisters. For example, She has four out-of-the-weather vestibules for access to the 04 level bridge. But no sketches or plans were available so I had to measure and sketch them up myself.

    Also on the Pan Deck of all three turrets a deluge tank was also installed to be half filled with water to dump any smoldering propellant bag into. I had to sketch up the location each tank was on in all three turrets. Getting into Turret III would have made me pass by the Sliding Padeye --- IF it was already there. I definitely would have had the ships photographer take photos of it and I would have sketched up its location. So I have to assume that they were added on later.

    Or, it is also possible she had only the one on the Starboard side and as I approached Turret III from the Port side and would not have noticed the unit. I know I approached from the port side because I had the ship's photographer take a photo of the boat handling boom Winch that I cannibalized off the Chicago.(see page 212 of my "yellow" book that shows the Winch.

    Therefor I stand corrected. Actually I'm sitting down, but you get the idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigjimslade
    replied
    I cannot find this detail on any of the others. It must be WI-only thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • bbvet
    replied
    bjs,

    This IS a photo of WISCONSIN, not one of the other IOWAs!!! I've asked the resident staff volunteer on WISCONSIN over on Model Ship Forum to see what he can find out about the equipment. He also has a photo in his album taken in May 2007 that shows this equipment as installed. Actually, I think the photo I posted from Google was originally his photo. Wonder how THAT happened?

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • bigjimslade
    replied
    It's definitely not on the NJ. It looks like that's a distinguishing identification feature.
    The NJ also does not have railings around connection between the kingpost and the O1 level.

    Leave a comment:


  • bbvet
    replied
    Sure hate to disagree with anyone, but the following photo of BB-64 in Norfolk may solve the question:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	USS-Wisconsin showing padeye.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	702.3 KB
ID:	1469165
    This also was a Google search. Don't see this on the other 3 IOWAs.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • bigjimslade
    replied
    It sounds, then, like something that was considered but never implemented on the Iowas.

    Leave a comment:


  • RustyBattleship
    replied
    Originally posted by JRT View Post
    I probably should not answer this because I am far from an expert on the subject matter, but that aside the drawing states that it is a "MODEL D-16 SLIDING PADEYE", 24 feet tall, located on and above the main deck at Frame 149.

    The sliding padeye in the following picture (Google found it) might not be the same as Model D-16, but is a similar device. My limited understanding is that it is used for underway replenishment. And I suspect that might be the "HELO CONTROL STATION PLATFORM" visible behind the item, but also am not at all sure about that.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]41935[/ATTACH]

    Here is another sliding padeye:

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]41934[/ATTACH]
    You are right on the money with the Sliding Padeye. It saved hundreds of hours Replenishing at Sea and solved many problems we had with other receiving systems.

    BUT, we never installed any on a Battleship. The turret you see in your first photo is probably the USS Salem. Your second photo I think was taken either at Port Hueneme, CA or at the Replenishment test center in Colt's Neck, NJ. The angled kingpost on the right WAS installed on all four Iowas for Refueling at Sea to replenish their escort ships.

    Leave a comment:

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