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  • #16
    Inspection Report # 1

    On 17 August 2018 I arrived in Norfolk to commence a two (2) day inspection of the USS Wisconsin, BB-64.

    The "Whisky" is permanently moored across from city hall in downtown Norfolk @ # 1 Waterside Drive.

    Mr. R. Clayton Allen is Battleships Operations Manager.
    Cell phone # 757-323-5405.
    Office # 757-664-1067.
    email - Clayton.Allen@Norfolk.gov

    A long story short " the email address on the website https://nauticus.org/ is non responsive. info@nauticus.org

    After e-mailing Clayton and cc-ing the info.nuaticus.org address I've still not got a response from the "Info address".
    No one at the reception desk could identify "who reads e-mails sent to that address".

    As I didn't have a first name contact until 1 P.M. on Friday, and Clayton Allen's daughter was getting married on 18 August I was scrambling to make "good contacts".

    The Public Relations Specialist Beth Bilderback appeared a bit overwhelmed by my appearance. (Photo attached.)
    I began to suspect the Nauticus attraction and the actual volunteers running the show for BB-64 are not exactly a hand in glove operation. Obviously the staff was unprepared for special requests. I have no doubt if you'd like to book an overnight stay aboard the Whisky it would be a smooth event. But as I was on a technical mission the wheels began to fall off the wagon.

    So it was time to avoid the negative responses being generated to my inquires and change my plowing technique.

    Enter Nicole Nussbaum !

    This young woman understood immediately that I was not looking for the normal "this is the port side and the other is starboard tour" geared for grade school kids. While she couldn't change city policy or override the rules she did get me in touch with the "docents with the keys".... and that made all the difference for the remaining time available on Friday and got me a "first up" start on Saturday.

    With the grocery list of requested photos from thread followers a course was charted and the battery condition of both cameras checked.

    For orientation the photos start at the bow and proceed along the port side towards the stern and then forward on the starboard side.
    As I shoot in a very high resolution (6MB) each photo requires downsizing to fit on the WAB.
    Please remember I've got a regular job and editing will be a slow process.
    All comments will be appreciated as I'm no expert on the Iowa's.

    So let's start at the bow.... the distinctive lines of the Iowa hull are illustrated in this photo.
    The black paint was applied last year. I learned that you can use special underwater $400/gallon paint and never take the ship out of the water.
    The docents couldn't provide an accurate answer but estimated BB-64 has not seen a "drydock" since the 1990's.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by blidgepump; 28 Aug 18,, 19:50.

    Comment


    • #17
      BP wrote (in part):
      Please remember I've got a regular job and editing will be a slow process.
      All comments will be appreciated as I'm no expert on the Iowa's.
      So far, very nice indeed!! A comment on your bow-on photo. Most folks are not aware that when ships go into "mothballs" i.e., prepared for long term storage at a pier, they are sealed up, parts removed, all ammo, food, etc. removed - which, reduces the overall weight of the ship. In drydock, the ship is sealed up on all openings underside and the waterline is repainted at a LOWER level than the normal operational waterline - thus it rides higher in the water and seems a bit taller. The draft marks (small white numbers) are also reset to reflect the lower waterline. If you were to compare this shot with a similar one from her operational days you would see what I'm describing.

      Keep up the excellent "photo tour" of the ship!!!

      Hank

      Comment


      • #18
        As a docent at a private museum myself it is often difficult to meet all requests from visitors, special or otherwise.

        I admit I operate on a different realm but when I want the "special tour" I start reaching out to the site about 6 months ahead of time if possible. That usually gets me successful access on the day(s) of my trip. I also talk to peers to see if they have backdoor contacts. Admittedly I tend to visit battlefields, museums, etc., but just a thought for future considerations.

        And I must admit I always preferred the Iowas bristling with the World War 2 armaments!
        “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
        Mark Twain

        Comment


        • #19
          bilge pump thanks for the great photos and excellent commentary! Your camera resolution, two cameras, composition, and clarity indicate one of great talent! Your images are definite eye candy for me! It surely supersedes mine by an extremely large margin! The bow shot is a great one! Thanks for shareing
          To add to bbvet’s excelent description of decommissioning, while the ship is in dd , catholic protection for the hull is installed. The ships interior is zoned, a complete DH (dehumidification system)is installed , and flooding alarm is also installed. There is much more, NSTM chapter 50 covers the process, which is available on line for those interested in a little light reading. http://www.hnsa.org/wp-content/uploa...4/07/ch050.pdf.

          As I recall in NISMD a ships status goes from ready reserve through a series of designations and finely stricken from naval record at which point all preservation stops Andy’s prepared for a museum or she is prepared for the breaker. Many museum requests happen early so the ship is in the best possible condition if the request is approved. If I am not mistaken the Iowa’s benefited from the early request. As I have been to the Massouri and Wisconsin as museums both in excellent shape. In particular the Wisconsin since she was berthed in Norfolk while still in ready reserve. When she was finely stricken she was in remarkable condition! And if I think not sure she was also given a coat of paint just prior to being berthed in Norfolk another benefit!

          Again thanks for the commentary and the photos bilgepump as bbvet says keep them coming!

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
            Arrived back home tonight and started unpacking.
            Almost 1200 jpegs were captured during the inspection of the USS Wisconsin & the Norfolk Naval Yard.

            Over the coming weeks I'll attached the imagines for your viewing enjoyment with the detail you probably will not find on Wiki or Goggle !
            Is there a little "trickery" in that first pic, lol? The superstructure looks to be viewed from centerline, while the bulk of the ship is viewed from a few degrees off the starboard bow. And what's up with the port side?
            It all makes for a very impressive view, regardless.

            Is she in her last configuration? I see Tomahawk launchers and Harpoon canisters, I think.

            That second pic is proof that we've got the best guy to share pictures with us! That's a "Wow" pic! "1942 U.S.NAVY" made me smile. "WT 30910" (the weight?) made my eyes get big. But I'm puzzled at "NO 14012". Does anybody know what that means?

            Thank you Blidgepump!!!

            And thank you to all who contribute information and explanations!!!

            Comment


            • #21
              Cruiser,

              After checking out online anything anchor, I'm coming up nil. However, my senses tell me that the No. 14012 indicates the Part No. or possibly the Contract No. for that anchor. Maybe someone else has a bit more clarity on this.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by bbvet View Post
                Cruiser,

                After checking out online anything anchor, I'm coming up nil. However, my senses tell me that the No. 14012 indicates the Part No. or possibly the Contract No. for that anchor. Maybe someone else has a bit more clarity on this.
                She was built in Philadelphia Navy Yard. Having worked in many shipyards not much happens in any shop unless there is a work order. Could the above No be a work order # for then PNSY foundry? I believe the shipyard had a foundry back then as did most navy yards of the period and in those days they tried to keep as much as possible in house, to minimize logistical problems, and the fact that one does not see in the photo the navy inspectors stamp of acceptance of a contract item (an anchor with a rope around the stock and flukes I think) would also indicate it was forged in house. Just a thought.

                Comment


                • #23
                  BM9,

                  I believe you've solved the riddle! I did find the explanation (as you gave) regarding USN stamp of acceptance from vendor items, etc. This would have been a PNSY foundry item, pretty surely! Good reply!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Turn the other cheek....

                    Originally posted by bbvet View Post
                    BM9,

                    I believe you've solved the riddle! I did find the explanation (as you gave) regarding USN stamp of acceptance from vendor items, etc. This would have been a PNSY foundry item, pretty surely! Good reply!
                    To offer another view of the starboard anchor please note the casting mark reciting Norfolk (?)
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      No Photoshop...

                      Originally posted by Cruiser View Post
                      Is there a little "trickery" in that first pic, lol? The superstructure looks to be viewed from centerline, while the bulk of the ship is viewed from a few degrees off the starboard bow. And what's up with the port side?
                      It all makes for a very impressive view, regardless.

                      Is she in her last configuration? I see Tomahawk launchers and Harpoon canisters, I think.

                      That second pic is proof that we've got the best guy to share pictures with us! That's a "Wow" pic! "1942 U.S.NAVY" made me smile. "WT 30910" (the weight?) made my eyes get big. But I'm puzzled at "NO 14012". Does anybody know what that means?

                      Thank you Blidgepump!!!

                      And thank you to all who contribute information and explanations!!!
                      While the angles for capturing imagines is challenging the photos haven't been "Photo Shopped"
                      Using available light and shadow is often very effective on Haze Gray painted surfaces.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Head bumping .... # 64

                        Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                        As a docent at a private museum myself it is often difficult to meet all requests from visitors, special or otherwise.

                        I admit I operate on a different realm but when I want the "special tour" I start reaching out to the site about 6 months ahead of time if possible. That usually gets me successful access on the day(s) of my trip. I also talk to peers to see if they have backdoor contacts. Admittedly I tend to visit battlefields, museums, etc., but just a thought for future considerations.

                        And I must admit I always preferred the Iowas bristling with the World War 2 armaments!
                        Albany I agree with you on both counts. I like the WWII config best!

                        Attempts to contact the Whisky folks stared last January via email.
                        A former BB-64 docent made contact and was most gracious with his time, but he'd remarried and is now a docent on BB-63.
                        This was a hard ship to get connections versus the Fletchers experience. A great learning curve when I manage to work in the Iowa & Missouri.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by blidgepump; 28 Aug 18,, 04:11.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Anchor # ??? ...

                          Originally posted by bbvet View Post
                          Cruiser,

                          After checking out online anything anchor, I'm coming up nil. However, my senses tell me that the No. 14012 indicates the Part No. or possibly the Contract No. for that anchor. Maybe someone else has a bit more clarity on this.
                          The Port and Starboard anchor have different numbers... so I'm guessing the Norfolk Yard used this as a Serial number(?)
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            BP,

                            That would be a good guess - this is strange as she was built in Philadelphia Navy Yard, perhaps Norfolk provided the anchors...obviously, at least, on this ship! I wonder what the others have stamped on their anchors.

                            Excellent photos, BTW!!! Very clear and detailed!
                            Last edited by bbvet; 28 Aug 18,, 11:18. Reason: additional Kudos

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Where have you gone Baldt anchor...

                              Originally posted by bbvet View Post
                              BP,

                              That would be a good guess - this is strange as she was built in Philadelphia Navy Yard, perhaps Norfolk provided the anchors...obviously, at least, on this ship! I wonder what the others have stamped on their anchors.

                              Excellent photos, BTW!!! Very clear and detailed!
                              The high resolution digital imagines help illustrate specific visuals.

                              Mr. "L" had spent some time educating me on USN anchors with the discussion only advancing as far as "Baldt Anchors & anchor chain" before his passing.
                              I recall his mentioning that the USN did cast some anchors but the recitals did not advance long enough to capture his massive knowledge about the Iowa's.
                              There was a navy diver who wrote on one of the WAB threads that he'd recovered at least one Navy anchor. From posted Youtube videos loosing an anchor may occur more that I realized.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Got it...I realized afterward that sounded a bit preachy...didn't mean it.

                                You obviously know just what the hell your doing!

                                TBH I haven't been to Nauticus for about 8 or 9 years. My appreciation at the time was that the Wisconsin was considered a separate entity that happened to be "parked" outside.

                                Any better relationship today?
                                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                                Mark Twain

                                Comment

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