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Destroyers - Fletcher Class

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  • #16
    Good story

    The account is fun to read.
    I need to google. Admiral james Holloway..
    Re examinig the events of the battle certainly adds to the lore of the Fletcher class destroyer.
    Last edited by blidgepump; 07 Oct 10,, 02:56.

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    • #17
      Interesting sidebar Wisconsin, about Admiral James Holloway and the Iowa going into drydock during WW II!
      Haven't read about this technique in any of stories recited in Rusty's Yellow Book !!!!!

      Holloway operated his battleship with characteristic flair, recalled Rear Admiral Ralph Kirk James, who had been the maintenance officer responsible for repair work on damaged ships at Manus when Iowa arrived at that base to fix shafting problems on 25 December 1944. "Jimmy Holloway was charging up the harbor with this big battleship, the biggest I'd seen, and I was getting more and more nervous." Alarmed, James warned Holloway to reduce his speed before entering the drydock. "'Oh no,' [Holloway] said...He got the ship just about halfway into the dry dock when he ordered full speed astern. The Iowa shook like a damned destroyer and stopped just where she was supposed to be." Unfortunately, the backwash from the engine reversal swept away the drydock support blocks from underneath the ship, and James and his crew had to spend an extra three hours resetting the blocks before Iowa could dock. Afterward, James discovered a grey streak in his hair. "I can tell you the moment it was born: when Holloway pulled his high-speed throttle-jockey stunt on me."[10] Wiki story.... from Wiki
      Last edited by blidgepump; 08 Oct 10,, 13:24.

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      • #18
        Plimsoll Line & Shearing Plate

        Plimsoll Line indicating the legal limit to which a ship may be loaded for specific water types and temperatures. This symbol must also be permanently marked, so that if the paint wears off it remains visible. The load line makes it easy for anyone to determine if a ship has been overloaded.

        So, I assumed the marks on the bow of the Kidd were welded?

        Shearing plate has only one ding, not bad for 65 + year old warship ?

        The dimples in the hull plating are caused by a ______________________ ?

        A. Unsecured anchor swinging in the breeze.
        B. Millwright venting his emotions with a munday mall after being shorted on his pay slip.
        C. Defective steel purchased at reduce cost from supplier to make up for cost over run.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by blidgepump; 08 Oct 10,, 18:13.

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        • #19
          I am enjoying this "feature" on the Fletcher class, and look forward to the next installment -- Thank you Bilgepump!

          So, I assumed the marks on the bow of the Kidd were welded? I have read that the rules call for the plimsoll marks to be welded on commercial ships, so they can't be easily altered. Looks like these are welded.

          Shearing plate has only one ding, not bad for 65 + year old warship
          If it is original, it looks like it may be a replacement

          The dimples in the hull plating are caused by aMy guess is A an anchor
          Last edited by USSWisconsin; 11 Oct 10,, 15:59.
          sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
          If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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          • #20
            Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
            Interesting sidebar Wisconsin, about Admiral James Holloway and the Iowa going into drydock during WW II!
            Haven't read about this technique in any of stories recited in Rusty's Yellow Book !!!!!

            Holloway operated his battleship with characteristic flair, recalled Rear Admiral Ralph Kirk James, who had been the maintenance officer responsible for repair work on damaged ships at Manus when Iowa arrived at that base to fix shafting problems on 25 December 1944. "Jimmy Holloway was charging up the harbor with this big battleship, the biggest I'd seen, and I was getting more and more nervous." Alarmed, James warned Holloway to reduce his speed before entering the drydock. "'Oh no,' [Holloway] said...He got the ship just about halfway into the dry dock when he ordered full speed astern. The Iowa shook like a damned destroyer and stopped just where she was supposed to be." Unfortunately, the backwash from the engine reversal swept away the drydock support blocks from underneath the ship, and James and his crew had to spend an extra three hours resetting the blocks before Iowa could dock. Afterward, James discovered a grey streak in his hair. "I can tell you the moment it was born: when Holloway pulled his high-speed throttle-jockey stunt on me."[10] Wiki story.... from Wiki
            Sounds like Jimmy Holloway was quite a cowboy - I had heard about his block scattering before
            sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
            If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

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            • #21
              Sonar Dome one never sees

              Fletchers were equipped with sonar equipment to detect submarines. Sonarmen were sometimes called "ping jockeys" because of the pinging sound made by sonar equipment monitoring for submarines. Diagrams viewed on several websites recite that the sonar dome is offset from the centerline. Attached is a view seen only by a few when the ship is drydocked.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Stern view

                DD-661, built by Federal, Kearney, NJ , with Two - 12' dia. three bladed propellers driven by geared turbines. Four Babcock & Wilcox, 565 PSI boilers with superheaters. This photo of the stern offers a good view of the screws, shafts, struts & rudder along with a little Mississippi River mud.
                Attached Files
                Last edited by blidgepump; 12 Oct 10,, 14:21.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
                  Interesting sidebar Wisconsin, about Admiral James Holloway and the Iowa going into drydock during WW II!
                  Haven't read about this technique in any of stories recited in Rusty's Yellow Book !!!!!

                  Holloway operated his battleship with characteristic flair, recalled Rear Admiral Ralph Kirk James, who had been the maintenance officer responsible for repair work on damaged ships at Manus when Iowa arrived at that base to fix shafting problems on 25 December 1944. "Jimmy Holloway was charging up the harbor with this big battleship, the biggest I'd seen, and I was getting more and more nervous." Alarmed, James warned Holloway to reduce his speed before entering the drydock. "'Oh no,' [Holloway] said...He got the ship just about halfway into the dry dock when he ordered full speed astern. The Iowa shook like a damned destroyer and stopped just where she was supposed to be." Unfortunately, the backwash from the engine reversal swept away the drydock support blocks from underneath the ship, and James and his crew had to spend an extra three hours resetting the blocks before Iowa could dock. Afterward, James discovered a grey streak in his hair. "I can tell you the moment it was born: when Holloway pulled his high-speed throttle-jockey stunt on me."[10] Wiki story.... from Wiki
                  *Iowa was drydocking in Manus for emergency repairs to her #3 shaft that slipped 3" in her strut bearing. The real entry for this event is very interesting, but Wiki is Wiki. Holloway is also noted for risk during the Korean War. In August of 1950 he took Missouri to sea despite a hurricane threatening the East Coast. She suffered damage but damage they deemed negligible. Other CO's also proved the ships handling capabilities in a few instances of note.
                  Last edited by Dreadnought; 12 Oct 10,, 15:47.
                  Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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                  • #24
                    It seems being Captain of a Destroyer breeds confidence that carries with an officer as his career progresses ?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
                      It seems being Captain of a Destroyer breeds confidence that carries with an officer as his career progresses ?
                      I would think being the Captain of any ship under the USN or CG would carry with him everywhere he goes and for how long he lives. Just my opinion though.
                      Last edited by Dreadnought; 13 Oct 10,, 05:12.
                      Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Hell, most jobs and position of authority will carry people wherever they go, and people will carry that authority with them wherever they go.

                        I was the Brigade CO's personal tank gunner. Best tank gunner in a 2,500 person brigade. Damn straight I carried that with me
                        Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                        Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

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                        • #27
                          I always felt it was the Fletcher class that won the war ... they were the heart and soul of the small-ship Navy.1
                          (1) Lt. Comdr. Fred Edwards, Destroyer Type Desk, Bureau of Ships, 1942, quoted in Holland, Rear Admiral W. J., Jr., USN (Ret), ed.; The Navy, page 115, 2000, Naval Historical Foundation, Washington

                          Confidence is a good character trait when directing a 2100 ton ship in harms way.

                          This concludes the first part of thread of the USS Kidd. ( below the boot top )

                          The second part will take the reader on a tour of the Kidd's flush deck.
                          A design that added structural strength, although it did make them rather cramped as the pictures that follow will illustrate.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
                            “I always felt it was the Fletcher class that won the war ... they were the heart and soul of the small-ship Navy.”1
                            (1) Lt. Comdr. Fred Edwards, Destroyer Type Desk, Bureau of Ships, 1942, quoted in Holland, Rear Admiral W. J., Jr., USN (Ret), ed.; The Navy, page 115, 2000, Naval Historical Foundation, Washington

                            Confidence is a good character trait when directing a 2100 ton ship in harms way.

                            This concludes the first part of thread of the USS Kidd. ( below the boot top )

                            The second part will take the reader on a tour of the Kidd's flush deck.
                            A design that added structural strength, although it did make them rather cramped as the pictures that follow will illustrate.
                            Many refered to them as a backbone of the USN during WWII. The stories these men can tell of their time at sea and on rough seas is just incredible to say the least. Some of us have been privy to some of these stories from chance encounters with such men.
                            Last edited by Dreadnought; 13 Oct 10,, 14:40.
                            Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Abve the boot top

                              The next section of review will address specific features / design/ and weapons system of the Fletcher Class Destroyer beginning on deck. Thanks to the restoration effortrs of the USS Kidd many features provide an excellent example of a Fletcher well preserved.

                              Note the attached jpeg illustrating the classic profile view of a ship sent into harms way with the weapons system to silence the enemy.
                              Attached Files

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by blidgepump View Post
                                Note the attached jpeg illustrating the classic profile view of a ship sent into harms way with the weapons system to silence the enemy.
                                The Kidd has the "Late war" AA mod. Forward torpedo tubes removed for the gun director towers and quad 40s. That program started in Apr 45. Eventually about 50 Fletchers recieved the mod but by wars end only about 8 made it to the combat zone.

                                Cannot mention the Fletchers without bringing up great ships like the Johnson. Her CO said at the commissioning
                                "This is going to be a fighting ship. I intend to go in harm's way, and anyone who doesn't want to go along had better get off right now."
                                Lt. Cmdr. Ernest E. Evans

                                And fight she did.. The first ship in Taffy 3 to turn towards the Japanese fleet, without orders. Commander Evans would be awarded the Medal Of Honor (posthumous) for his actions that day. Leading the charge that turned back the Japanese Center Force and the Yamato

                                And a few of my favorites to show different camo measures.

                                Have I ever mentioned that Fletchers are my favorite ships?

                                Sumner/Gearings come a close second though
                                Attached Files
                                Last edited by Gun Grape; 16 Oct 10,, 01:36.
                                Human Scum. Proud Never Trumper

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