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  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by jrb1537 View Post
    Freedom (LCS-1) suffered an engineering casualty recently, too. Seems that a seal failed, allowing sea water into the engine lube oil system for the propulsion diesels.
    In the article below, it seems interesting that an engine was damaged, is now in need of replacement or overhaul, and yet three months later, "No final decision has been made yet on the options for follow-on repairs to Freedom related to the July 11 engineering casualty.”

    LCS Freedom CO fired after engine damages

    Defense News
    10/14/2016

    The head of the surface Navy on Thursday fired the commanding officer of a littoral combat ship that damaged one of its main propulsion diesel engines in July.

    Vice Adm. Tom Rowden cashiered the CO of Crew 106 of LCS Freedom, Cmdr. Michael Wohnhaas, “due to loss of confidence in his ability to effectively lead and carry out his assigned duties,” Naval Surface Force Pacific said in a Friday release announcing the removal.

    “The loss of confidence followed an investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding damage to the ship's number 2 main propulsion diesel engine (#2 MPDE) that occurred in the operation areas off the coast of southern California on July 11,” the SURFPAC release said. “No final decision has been made yet on the options for follow-on repairs to Freedom related to the July 11 engineering casualty.”

    Navy Times’ sister publication Defense News reported in August that the Freedom’s diesel engine was damaged by a crewmember's error and would need to be completely rebuilt or replaced entirely.

    The Freedom’s engine casualty was followed six weeks later by the engineering breakdown on LCS Coronado, which forced the ship to return to port for repairs at the start of its maiden deployment. Two weeks later, the Montgomery was forced to lock its port propellers and return to port to get fixed only three days after its commissioning. The beleaguered LCS class has suffered five engineering mishaps in the last year, intensifying the scrutiny for the new ship class. Amid these incidents, Rowden ordered a safety standown for all LCS engineering in August and has ordered all engineers on the ships, officers and enlisted, to re-train and re-certify.

    Wohnhaas is the second LCS CO fired this year in the wake of engineering problems. In March, the CO of the Fort Worth was ousted amid a probe into the damages to the ship’s propulsion gears on deployment.

    Wohnhaas has been temporarily reassigned SURFPAC. Capt. Matthew McGonigle, the deputy commodore of LCS Squadron 1, will act as the temporary CO.

    Wohnhaas is a 1996 Naval Academy graduate who had been slated to command the future LCS Detroit, according to his official bio. Wohnhaas did not immediately respond to requests for comment Friday.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisV71
    replied
    Montgomery is probably getting a reputation as a hard luck ship...

    Tug collides with LCS Montgomery, cracks the hull
    By: David B. Larter, October 6, 2016 (Photo Credit: Austal USA)
    The littoral combat ship Montgomery can’t seem to catch a break.

    Less than three weeks since a pair of engineering casualties sent the trimaran into port for repairs, Montgomery took a hard knock from a tug as it sortied from Mayport, Florida ahead of the Hurricane Matthew.

    The Tuesday collision opened up a foot-long crack amidships along a weld seam, about three feet above the waterline, according to a report obtained by Navy Times. The crack was letting in about a gallon of water every three minutes until sailors plugged the quarter-inch crack with wedges, the report said.

    Sailors installed dewatering systems to the space; the ship does not need to come back into port.

    The accident happened in choppy waters with winds gusting up to 30 nautical miles-per-hour in Mayport harbor.

    "As the ship was departing the [Mayport] basin, pilot requested tugs come along the starboard side to push Montgomery further from the quay wall and the aft landed hard on the starboard side" the report reads.

    Sailors also reported five of the horizontal beams in the hull – called stringers – were bent.

    Naval Surface Force Pacific confirmed to report in a statement, adding that an investigation was underway to determine the cause of the fender-bender.

    "USS Montgomery (LCS 8) sustained a crack to its hull while getting underway from Naval Station Mayport under orders to sortie Oct. 4,” the statement read. “This crack resulted in minor seawater intrusion, but was contained by the crew. An investigation into possible causes is underway, and the ship will receive more permanent repairs upon her return to port.”

    Montgomery, alongside the cruiser Anzio and amphibious assault ship Iwo Jima, were sortied from Mayport ahead of the storm, which is expected to slam into Florida’s east coast as a massive Category 4 hurricane.

    The Air Force Hurricane Hunters measured the storms’ winds overnight at 125 mph, and the storm is expected to strengthen as it approaches Florida tonight.

    Montgomery suffered a pair of engineering failures within 24 hours, the Navy announced Sept. 16. The ship pulled into Mayport on its own power for repairs, which were under warranty from the manufacturer.

    https://www.navytimes.com/articles/t...racks-the-hull

    Leave a comment:


  • kato
    replied
    Originally posted by Tankersteve View Post
    Also, while acknowledging how little I know about ship damage control
    Swift was built to civilian standards and pretty much didn't have any builtin damage control. Aluminium vs anti-ship missiles is a thing since the Falklands.

    Missile was likely a C-802. Threat scenario - for LCS - should be seen with a bit of a grain of salt, given the Houthi aren't exactly some backwater militia. Where others would resort to suicide bombers these guys instead have been firing upgraded SCUDs at Saudi military targets several hundred miles behind the front quite regularly over the past 18 months. And with far more success than say Iraq in '91. These ain't the kinda guys where the USN would send a LCS. At least not alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tankersteve
    replied
    Whew

    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    Makes me wonder about the aluminium in the Independence-class. Also, while acknowledging how little I know about ship damage control, it is kind of impressive that she didn't burn to the waterline.

    Tankerstev

    Leave a comment:


  • jlvfr
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    Wooooow...

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    Here is some food for thought.

    http://gcaptain.com/photos-show-cata...issile-attack/

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    Video: launch of Wichita.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b_wnwFpw26g

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    An updated report on LCS 8 engineering casualty.

    https://news.usni.org/2016/09/16/lit...rs-engineering

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    LCS 8 Montgomery suffers an engineering casualty .

    https://news.usni.org/2016/09/16/lit...rs-engineering
    Gotta say that is one stupid looking ship from above. Makes me want to send a torpedo on it's way towards the forward 1/3.

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    I"m thinking about designing some art using all of the surpluse damaged gear sets out of these blenders known as the LCS!

    Leave a comment:


  • SteveDaPirate
    replied
    Wow another one? I'm wondering how much of this is the engineering in the ships and how much is operator error with the weird manning.

    My hunch is that it is largely the manning system they cooked up since both classes of LCS have been afflicted by repeated engineering casualties and their internal stuff has different designs.

    Leave a comment:


  • jlvfr
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    LCS 8 Montgomery suffers an engineering casualty .

    https://news.usni.org/2016/09/16/lit...rs-engineering
    ... seriously?!

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    LCS 8 Montgomery suffers an engineering casualty .

    https://news.usni.org/2016/09/16/lit...rs-engineering

    Leave a comment:


  • Monash
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    LCS 13 Wichita is to be launched on September 17th.

    http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/...5-wichita.html
    Quoting from the attached article:

    "Plagued by cost overruns, design and survivability issues, the planned LCS fleet has been winnowed from an original projected force of 52 ships. To fill that gap, the Pentagon has announced a multi-mission frigate."

    Its starting to sound like the Navy is losing its appetite for the LCS program and has decided to go with a 'proper' or more conventional frigate design. What chance they decide to cut their loses and pursue other options (say a modified EPF) or just try and get the LCS mine hunting suit up and running and buy just enough of them for this primary role and maybe anti-piracy work as a secondary task.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    LCS 13 Wichita is to be launched on September 17th.

    http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/...5-wichita.html
    A new witch...

    Leave a comment:

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