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Littoral Combat Ships

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  • kato
    replied
    The usual assumption is that they bought the design from a Russian design company who was trying to peddle just this to the Russian Navy a bit over a year ago.

    Realistically, if they procure them in numbers, the focus will likely be on pretty much providing helicopter platforms to operationally replace the extant fleet of Type 037 subchasers and other littoral craft, filling the ASW-focus role that the Type 022 missile boats and Type 056 corvettes don't cover.

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  • bfng3569
    replied
    China's New Frigate Design Looks Awfully Familiar


    The three-hull design is more heavily armed than the American ship that inspired it.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/mili...-hull-frigate/

    A new frigate design being built for China's People's Liberation Army Navy bears a striking resemblance to the U.S. Navy's littoral combat ship. The design, as reported by Jane's Defense Weekly, uses a three-hull trimaran design and is more heavily armed than the Independence-class LCS ships.

    A model of the ship design was being exhibited by the China Shipbuilding Trading Company at the IDEX 2017 arms show in Abu Dhabi. According to JDW, the ship displaces 2,450 tons and has a length of 465 feet. The ship is powered by diesel engines powering an electric propulsion system, giving it a cruising speed of 25 knots and the ability to sprint between 30 and 35 knots. It has a crew of more than 100.

    The ship is impressively armed for its small size, packing a 76-millimeter gun in the bow, with a field of 16 or 32 vertical launch missile silos behind it. It also has two box launchers of four anti-ship missiles each, two 30-millimeter close-in weapon systems, and a pair of decoy rocket launchers for deflecting incoming missiles. The ship is built to support up to two helicopters with two hangars and a large helicopter landing pad.

    The ship is very, very similar to the U.S. Navy's Independence-class Littoral Combat Ships. The Independence class is roughly the same weight but 50 feet shorter and with typically thirty percent fewer crew. It is also capable of much greater speeds, "sprinting" for short distances at up to 45 knots. The baseline version of the U.S. Navy's trimarans have only a single, smaller 57-millimeter gun and two 30-millimeter guns. A new, upgunned version of the ship adding Hellfire anti-surface missiles and a new over-the-horizon anti-ship missile may begin construction next year.

    It's unclear why the Chinese Navy would want these ships. China already has a monohull frigate class, the Type 054A Jiangkai II. While the Type 054As are fifty percent larger in tonnage than the new trimaran design, the assembly line is already up and running having already produced 23 of the frigates. Trimaran hulls offer increased stability in high seas and wider hulls to accommodate side-by-side aircraft hangars. This suggests that aviation—both manned and unmanned—is going to be a bigger part of the Chinese Navy's surface fleet of the future.

    This is not the first Chinese trimaran. The two relatively new Type 917 salvage and rescue ships serving with the North and East Sea Fleets also sport a three hull configuration.

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  • surfgun
    replied
    Yes the current operators (valet service), are banging the snot out of the clientels vehicles! Thank you, Jimmy Carter!

    Leave a comment:


  • jlvfr
    replied
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Another one set to sail.

    Ok, odds and bets on when this one has her first engineering issue!

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/28/politi...rds/index.html
    Keep it away from the Canal!

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Another one set to sail.

    Ok, odds and bets on when this one has her first engineering issue!

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/28/politi...rds/index.html

    USS Gabrielle Giffords at nation's service
    Zachary Cohen-Profile-Image

    By Zachary Cohen, CNN

    Updated 4:10 PM ET, Wed December 28, 2016
    Navy commissions controversial vessel
    Navy commissions controversial vessel

    Navy commissions controversial vessel 00:59

    (CNN)The USS Gabrielle Giffords is set to sail.
    The Navy accepted delivery of the $475-million littoral combat ship from shipbuilders during a ceremony in Mobile, Alabama, last week.
    Named in honor of the former Arizona congresswoman who was shot in the head and badly wounded in 2011, the vessel is the ninth littoral combat ship to join the fleet.

    It is also the 16th naval ship to be named for a woman.
    The Navy expects to receive a total of 26 LCS ships, which come in two versions, the Independence class and Freedom class.
    The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin and the Independence variant is built by Austal USA. The Giffords vessel is of the Independence class.
    The official transfer of the ship -- which took four years to build -- from Austal USA to the Navy marks the final milestone before it is commissioned into active service, which is planned for 2017, according to the Navy.

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  • Tankersteve
    replied
    https://warisboring.com/the-u-s-navy...0eb#.ncxhltu2b

    The current JCIDS process is purpose-built for complex programs like LCS. This article really breaks down how the Navy worked to circumvent it, to the detriment of all except the stockholders of the builders...

    Tankersteve

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  • jlvfr
    replied
    Originally posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Sort of like paper, rock, scissors. The paper hull of the Montgomery hit the rock wall of the canal. Usually paper wins so something went wrong here...
    Nah, the rock scissored up the hull... ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Sort of like paper, rock, scissors. The paper hull of the Montgomery hit the rock wall of the canal. Usually paper wins so something went wrong here...

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    Here is a hi-Rez photo of LCS Montgomery: note the patches on the port side particularly the aft corner and I think one can see some of her Panama Canal damage on her bow.

    http://www.navy.mil/management/photo...-FC195-045.JPG
    Last edited by surfgun; 12 Nov 16,, 01:38.

    Leave a comment:


  • surfgun
    replied
    Classic!

    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    "Under control of the local Panama Canal Pilot, the ship impacted the center lock wall and sustained an 18-inch-long crack between her port quarter and transom plates. The crack is located 8-10 feet above the waterline and poses no water intrusion or stability risk."

    That's an easy fix...
    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by JRT; 31 Oct 16,, 23:55.

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  • jlvfr
    replied
    That's it, it's official: the ship is cursed. Call a priest...

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisV71
    replied
    You've got to be kidding me...

    Littoral Combat Ship USS Montgomery Damaged Transiting Panama Canal

    By: Sam LaGrone
    October 31, 2016 4:59 PM

    The Littoral Combat Ship USS Montgomery (LCS-6) suffered damage during a transit through the Panama Canal on its way to its new homeport in San Diego, Calif., USNI News has learned.

    Montgomery, was crossing from the Atlantic to the Pacific when the LCS collided with one of the walls of the lock and suffered damage to the hull on Oct. 29, Cmdr. Ryan Perry with U.S. 3rd Fleet told USNI News on Monday.

    “Under control of the local Panama Canal Pilot, the ship impacted the center lock wall and sustained an 18-inch-long crack between her port quarter and transom plates,” Perry said.
    “The crack is located 8-10 feet above the waterline and poses no water intrusion or stability risk.”

    The ship is now on the Pacific side of the canal heading to its new homeport.

    Damage through the canal transit is the third incident to occur to Montgomery since the ship commissioned in September.

    Days after its commissioning, the Austal USA-built Montgomery suffered two separate engineering casualties on Sept. 13 on its first intended transit of the Panama Canal.

    “The first casualty happened when the crew detected a seawater leak in the hydraulic cooling system. Later that day, Montgomery experienced a casualty to one of its gas turbine engines,” read a September statement.
    Then on Oct. 4, when the ship was scrambling from Naval Station Mayport, Fla. to avoid the path of Hurricane Matthew, the ship “took a hard knock from a tug,” according to a report in Navy Times.

    The following is the complete Oct. 31, 2016 statement from U.S. 3rd Fleet

    On Oct. 29 USS Montgomery (LCS 8) sustained damage to her hull while transiting Southbound through the Gatun and Pedro Miguel locks of the Panama Canal. Under control of the local Panama Canal Pilot, the ship impacted the center lock wall and sustained an 18-inch-long crack between her port quarter and transom plates. The crack is located 8-10 feet above the waterline and poses no water intrusion or stability risk.

    The ship has continued her transit as scheduled, has now exited the Panama Canal and is expected to arrive at her new homeport of San Diego next month.

    https://news.usni.org/2016/10/31/uss...ged-transiting

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  • surfgun
    replied
    Detroit (rock city) is to commission on October 22nd.

    http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/...1-detroit.html

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  • JRT
    replied
    Davidson: 'We are going to get unmanned only through LCS'

    Inside Defense
    10/12/2016


    PORTSMOUTH, VA -- The Navy will make strides in developing and deploying unmanned systems through the Littoral Combat Ship, according to the head of all naval forces based on the East Coast.

    The ship's large mission bays lend themselves well to operating unmanned vehicles compared to other surface vessels, Adm. Philip Davidson, the chief of Fleet Forces Command, said here Oct. 12 during a keynote address at the Expeditionary Warfare Conference.

    "We are going to get unmanned only through LCS," Davidson said, highlighting how the limited space, weight, cooling and power margins on guided missile destroyers and other ships will limit them to operating only smaller unmanned vehicles.

    "That big mission bay, we are going to be extraordinarily grateful for as we think about that capability set moving forward," he said.

    The Navy is developing several unmanned systems to operate off of LCSs. The Common Unmanned Surface Vehicle will carry minehunting and influence gear as part of the LCS mine countermeasures mission package. The Knifefish unmanned underwater vehicle, meanwhile, will hunt for mines as part of the mission package as well.

    Two MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicles are currently in use aboard the LCS Coronado (LCS-4) deployed in the Western Pacific. The MQ-8B and the larger MQ-8C will carry sensors as part of both the surface warfare and mine countermeasures mission packages, respectively.

    Though not planned for incorporation into any of the mission packages, the Navy’s LCS program executive office is also responsible for developing the Large Diameter Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (LDUUV).

    The surface Navy, meanwhile, recently began implementing changes to the way it will man, operate and maintain LCSs.

    ...

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