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Littoral Combat Ships

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  • jlvfr
    replied
    I wasn't even thinking about warhead size, but missile range. With that size, it can't be that much, which means that the LCS risks firing pretty much at the same time as an opponent...

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  • Skywatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    The Griffin has 13 pound warhead. Other than against a speedboat, what would that be good for?
    Shooting at anything pretty much of civilian origin, barring oil tankers and the like.

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  • surfgun
    replied
    The Griffin has a 13 pound warhead. Other than against a speedboat, what would that be good for?
    Last edited by surfgun; 12 Jan 11,, 22:08.

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  • jlvfr
    replied
    I can't find any mention on the missile's range but, considering it's components, it can't be much... wouldn't this force the LCS into a close range fight?

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  • HKDan
    replied
    It looks like the Navy is taking a look at Raytheon's Griffin missile as a possible replacement for the cancelled PAMS. If it works out and is adopted, it could be a major positive development for the LCS program. Griffin is a missile that was developed by Raytheon as a lightweight alternative to Hellfire for use on UAVs. It uses some parts from Javelin and AIM-9X.

    Raytheon Company: AUSA 2010: Griffin and Small Tactical Munition

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    And then there are those that would say either they arent needed by the USN for future operations or they cannot bring the costs in line. Guess they were wrong. Go figure.:whome:

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  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    It looks like the LCS costs are finally getting under control with the new contracts.
    Navy awards LCS deals to Lockheed, Austal - Navy News | News from Afghanistan & Iraq - Navy Times

    Related to this...

    U.S. Department of Defense
    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)
    N00024-11-C-2300
    N00024-11-C-2301
    Defense.gov: Contracts for Wednesday, December 29, 2010


    Lockheed Martin Corp., Baltimore, Md., is being awarded a fixed-price-incentive contract for the fiscal 2010-2015 block buy of Flight 0+ Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). The fiscal 2010 LCS Flight 0+ ship award amount is $436,852,639. There are additional line items totaling $54,742,639 for technical data package, core class services, provisioned items orders, ordering, a not-to-exceed line item for non-recurring engineering, and data items. The total amount of the contract is $491,595,278. The contract includes line items for nine additional ships and options for post delivery support, additional crew and shore support, special studies, class services, class standard equipment support, economic order quantity equipment, selected ship systems equipment for a second source and selected ship system integration and test for a second source which, if authorized/exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $4,570,604,367. The cumulative value excluding any option items related to the second source is $4,069,913,166. Work will be performed in Marinette, Wis. (56 percent); Walpole, Mass. (14 percent); Washington, D.C. (12 percent); Oldsmar, Fla. (4 percent); Beloit, Wis. (3 percent); Moorestown, N.J. (2 percent); Minneapolis, Minn. (2 percent); and various locations of less than one percent, each totaling seven percent. Work is expected to be complete by August 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year, except for fiscal 2010 RDT&E. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website with two offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-11-C-2300).

    Austal USA, LLC, Mobile, Ala., is being awarded a fixed-price-incentive contract for the fiscal 2010-2015 block buy of Flight 0+ Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). The fiscal 2010 LCS Flight 0+ ship award amount is $432,069,883. There are additional line items totaling $33,398,998 for technical data package, core class services, provisioned items orders, ordering, a not-to-exceed line item for non-recurring engineering, and data items. The total amount of the contract is $465,468,881. The contract includes line items for nine additional ships and options for post delivery support, additional crew and shore support, special studies, class services, class standard equipment support, economic order quantity equipment, selected ship systems equipment for a second source and selected ship system integration and test for a second source which, if authorized/exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $4,386,301,775. The cumulative value excluding any option items related to the second source is $3,785,807,006. Work will be performed in Mobile, Ala. (50 percent); Pittsfield, Mass. (17 percent); Cincinnati, Ohio (3 percent); Baltimore, Md. (2 percent); Burlington, Vt. (2 percent); New Orleans, La. (2 percent); and various locations of less than two percent each totaling 24 percent. Work is expected to be complete by June 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year, except fiscal 2010 RDT&E. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website with two offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-11-C-2301).



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    ( :bana: be careful not to slip on the celebratory dancing bananas )

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  • surfgun
    replied
    It looks like the LCS costs are finally getting under control with the new contracts.
    Navy awards LCS deals to Lockheed, Austal - Navy News | News from Afghanistan & Iraq - Navy Times

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  • Xtvpry
    replied
    The two Mk 46 30 mm guns on LCS 1 look great, but remember they will not be fitted as standard and this would not be an ideal choice for defeating sea-skimming missiles or aircraft - good for knocking out small boats though, I have to say.

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  • Dreadnought
    replied
    Normal life expectancy of ships like this (smaller surface combatants) is 25 years on the hull life. However, if maintained well perhaps a few years longer.

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