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  • LCS 3 Fort Worth
    Attached Files
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

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    • Another shot of (PCU) LCS-4:

      "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

      Comment


      • I just saw this about a concept for a new missile for the LCS. While it is strictly a conceptual design at this point, it could conceivably go a long way towards addressing one of the most common complaints of the design, its light armament.
        http://defensetech.org/2012/01/18/bo...hips/#comments
        Last week we showed you this photo I took of a mysterious missile that Boeing had on display at the Surface Navy Association’s annual convention just outside of DC.

        I had never seen, or heard of, this missile before and no one at Boeing’s booth could talk about the weapon. Well, a spokeswoman with Boeing’s Phantom Works division just emailed me to explain that the Joint Air-Breathing Multi-Role Missile (JABMM) is being designed for use by the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). Remember, the sea service replaced the canceled Non-Line of Sight missile system as one of the LCS’ primary weapons with Raytheon’s tiny Griffin missile – a munition that was originally designed as a smaller alternative to Hellfire antitank missiles for use by UAVs. Well, the JABMM is a purpose-built weapon designed to take out fast moving enemy ships, aircraft and possibly even incoming missiles, explains Phantom Works spokeswoman Deborah VanNierop in the following email:

        The JABMM or Joint Air Breathing Multi-Role Missile is a surface engagement weapon enlisting air breathing propulsion capabilities for greater range than some current solid rocket propelled missiles. It could be used as an air interceptor or surface engagement weapon against fast moving vessels.

        The JABMM is designed to fit into deck mounted canisters aboard U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) for ease of ship integration.

        The JABMM would be launched out of its canister by a solid rocket booster and then at take over speed the turbo-jet air breathing engine would take over.

        The JABMM is currently a conceptual design.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by HKDan View Post
          The JABMM would be launched out of its canister by a solid rocket booster and then at take over speed the turbo-jet air breathing engine would take over.
          Anything with a "turbo-jet" in the description sounds expensive to me.
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          • Originally posted by JRT View Post
            Anything with a "turbo-jet" in the description sounds expensive to me.
            Yeah, I wonder what a production AUR of this would run. Missiles are going to be expensive, but this will be of little use if it comes out at a couple million a pop. I also wonder roughly what the intended range is.

            Comment


            • What really gets me is how all the internet forums keep slamming the LCS.

              But not a word is mentions about the F*&k story the LPD-17 program is. 7 ships already built. And not 1 considered mission capable. None capable of conducting operations except in a passive environment. And its sliding under the radar.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
                What really gets me is how all the internet forums keep slamming the LCS.

                But not a word is mentions about the F*&k story the LPD-17 program is. 7 ships already built. And not 1 considered mission capable. None capable of conducting operations except in a passive environment. And its sliding under the radar.
                Nothing like good PR ;)

                Comment


                • More "good LCS news."

                  By Michael Fabey [email protected]
                  WASHINGTON

                  The U.S. Navy has already altered its Freedom Class Littoral Combat Ship, LCS-1, to address problems uncovered in testing, but the ship still needs to be fundamentally redesigned, say leading defense analysts.

                  They base their conclusions on briefings from the Aviation Week Intelligence Network (AWIN) on the findings of Navy and industry reports detailing the vessel’s hull and deckhouse cracking and engine problems. AWIN was given exclusive access to the documents. The analysts also call for an investigation into how the ship was accepted in such — in their view — questionable shape. LCS-1 was built by a Lockheed Martin-led team.

                  AWIN subscribers can click here to read the complete story on the reports’ findings and the rebuttal from the LCS team.

                  “What the documents show is grounds for questioning this LCS variant’s viability,” says Ben Freeman, national security investigator for the Project On Government Oversight, who also was briefed on the reports.

                  “If the reports outlined are as serious as indicated, then there may be some significant redesign work required — even beyond the modifications to LCS-1 that have been made based on initial lessons learned with the first hull,” says Bob Nugent, vice president of advisory services for consultancy AMI International’s Washington operations.

                  As a result of hull cracking issues on LCS-1, the ship designed to be the Navy’s cheetah of the seas and envisioned as comprising about half of the service’s future surface combatant fleet was limited to a “safe operating envelope” in which it could travel no faster than a laden cargo freighter in sea-state 5 conditions, the reports show.

                  Analysts were equally dismayed about the reports’ findings on the engine failure reported earlier with the ship. The Rolls-Royce Trent MT30001 gas turbine engine shut down when components failed because of corrosion and oxidation following a number of significant and unexpected ingestions of seawater over an 18-month period.

                  Lockheed Martin and the Navy say the Freedom has since been repaired and upgraded to address the issues identified during that time and is scheduled to be redelivered to Naval Sea Systems Command (Navsea) soon with an eye toward re-evaluating its operational limitations.

                  “Navsea isn’t familiar with any new official ‘reports,’ either from Navy or industry sources, indicating the issues ... either new or as alarming [as indicated],” said Navsea spokesman Christopher Johnson when asked about the report’s findings and analysts’ conclusions.

                  “If it were my boat, I would tie the ship up and have a commercial tug take it back to the builder and demand he fix her,” defense analyst and Navy-issues author Norman Polmar says. “I’d stop production until that first ship is fixed and guarantee that similar problems don’t occur on the follow-ons.”

                  Comment


                  • Here we go again with the politicians.


                    Navy Names Littoral Combat Ship Gabrielle Giffords

                    Story Number: NNS120210-25 Release Date: 2/10/2012 3:57:00 PM

                    From Department of the Navy

                    WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 10 that the next Independence variant littoral combat ship (LCS) will be named USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10).

                    The selection of Gabrielle Giffords, designated LCS 10, honors the former congresswoman from Tucson, Ariz. who is known for supporting the military and veterans, advocating for renewable energy and championing border security. Giffords recently resigned from Congress to recover from wounds she sustained in an assassination attempt in 2011.

                    "The Navy motto is Semper Fortis, Always Courageous," said Mabus during a ceremony held in the Pentagon Courtyard. "Unwavering courage has defined the Navy for 236 years and it is what we expect, what we demand of our Sailors every single day. So it's very appropriate that LCS 10 be named for someone who has become synonymous with courage, who has inspired the nation with remarkable resiliency and showed the possibilities of the human spirit."

                    Mabus also announced the ship's sponsor will be Roxanna Green. Green is the mother of Christina-Taylor Green, the nine-year-old girl who was killed while attending the meeting of constituents where Giffords was shot. A ship's sponsor plays an important role in the life of the ship, naval tradition holds that her spirit and presence guide the ship throughout its service life.

                    "On that dark, tragic day now more than a year ago, Christina-Taylor Green was taken from us. A nine-year-old who had just been elected to the student council, she wanted to become a more active participant in our democracy. Her mother, Roxanna Green, continues to express her daughter's hope for the future and, as the President said, "of a nation as good as she imagined."

                    "I am pleased to honor Gabrielle Giffords and the people of Arizona with the naming of this ship," said Mabus. "Giffords and the ship's sponsor, Roxanna Green, are sources of great inspiration and represent the Navy and Marine Corps qualities of overcoming, adapting and coming out victorious despite great challenges."

                    The ship is part of a dual block buy of LCS class ships announced by Mabus in December 2010. By procuring both versions of the LCS - Lockheed Martin's semiplaning monohull and General Dynamic's aluminum trimaran - the Navy is stabilizing the LCS program and the industrial base with an award of 20 ships each; increasing ship procurement rates to support operational requirements; sustaining competition through the program; and enhancing foreign military sales opportunities. Both designs meet the Navy's LCS requirement. However, the diversity provided by two designs provides operational flexibility.

                    Littoral combat ships perform a vital role in the Navy's ability to execute DoD's Defense Strategy. USS Gabrielle Giffords will be designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal waters. A fast, agile surface combatant, the LCS provides the required warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions close to the shore, such as mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and surface warfare. The LCS class of ships will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed out quickly as combat needs demand. These mission packages are supported by special detachments that will deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine, undersea and surface warfare missions.

                    Gabrielle Giffords will be 419 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 103 feet, displace approximately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. The construction will be led by Austal Shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala.

                    This is the 16th ship to be named for a woman and the 13th ship to be named for a living person since 1850. This is the first ship to bear Giffords' name.

                    For additional information about the Littoral Combat Ship class, visit The US Navy -- Fact File: Littoral Combat Ship Class - LCS.

                    For more news, visit The U.S. Navy.

                    Comment


                    • Well, at least the unit costs are inching downward.

                      Navy orders four more LCS vessels
                      By Christopher P. Cavas - Staff writer
                      Posted : Friday Mar 16, 2012 18:10:13 EDT
                      Construction contracts for four more Littoral Combat Ships were awarded March 16 by the Navy, bringing the total number of LCS vessels under order or in service to 12.

                      Lockheed Martin received $715 million for two ships, or $357.5 million apiece.

                      Austal USA received $691.6 million for two ships, at $345.8 million each.

                      The funds do not include government-furnished equipment needed to fully outfit each ship, such as weapons or communications equipment.

                      All the ships were funded in the 2012 defense spending bill.

                      Lockheed will build the Little Rock (LCS 9) and Omaha (LCS 11) at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard in Marinette, Wis. The ships are to be delivered in February and August 2016, respectively, according to the 2013 budget.

                      Austal USA will build the Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and Sioux City (LCS 12) at its yard in Mobile, Ala. The Giffords is to be delivered in August 2015, while the Sioux City is to follow in March 2016.

                      All four ships are part of two 10-ship, fixed-price incentive block buys covering ships from each builder from 2010 to 2015.

                      Two classes of LCS are in production: Lockheed’s LCS 1-class single-hull ships and Austal USA’s all-aluminum trimaran LCS 2 class. So far, all odd-numbered ships are built to the Lockheed design, while Austal USA’s ships are even-numbered.

                      The first two LCS ships are in commission, and two more are to enter service this year. The Fort Worth (LCS 3) is to be delivered in June from Lockheed, and Austal USA is aiming for a March 2013 delivery of the Coronado (LCS 4).

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
                        Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 10 that the next Independence variant littoral combat ship (LCS) will be...

                        The ship is part of a dual block buy of LCS class ships announced by Mabus in...

                        By procuring both versions of the LCS - Lockheed Martin's semiplaning monohull and General Dynamic's aluminum trimaran - the Navy is stabilizing the LCS program and...

                        Both designs meet the Navy's LCS requirement. However, the diversity provided by two designs provides operational flexibility. ...

                        The LCS class of ships will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages...

                        For additional information about the Littoral Combat Ship class, visit The US Navy -- Fact File: Littoral Combat Ship Class - LCS.
                        The Navy's political spin doctors seem to put significant effort into emphasizing that they have characterized LCS as one class of ships with two designs/variants/versions/blocks, both meeting their requirements, the "diversity" providing operational flexibility.





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                        Last edited by JRT; 19 Mar 12,, 00:54.
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                        • Here is an article outlining some of the continued issues with LCS-1 Freedom.
                          What Price Freedom? Questions Of Worthiness Surround LCS-1

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                          • Admiral Rowden on LCS:

                            EXCLUSIVE: Navy Still Thrashing Out LCS Tactics, Design, Top Admiral Acknowledges

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                            • LCS program lauded, but Freedom not yet ready
                              By Christopher P. Cavas - Staff writer
                              Posted : Wednesday May 9, 2012 18:32:28 EDT
                              A pre-inspection assessment last week of the first Littoral Combat Ship rated the Freedom a “no-go” to proceed to a more comprehensive inspection scheduled for later this month.

                              The ship’s crew and contractors, said the senior inspector in an internal message, “were not prepared for the [pre-] inspection,” and “were unfamiliar with the conduct of [Board of Inspection and Survey] material checks.”

                              Half — 14 — of the inspected areas were rated “red,” or no-go. Eight categories received yellow marks, while six were rated green, or go. One of the 29 rated areas was not demonstrated.

                              RELATED READING

                              Navy: Trials successful for newest LCS (May 7)

                              LCS Independence arrives at its San Diego home (May 2)

                              While the inspector noted that the ship’s crew demonstrated “a good positive attitude” and was able to properly “self-assess,” the internal message noted that, “safety programs aboard the ship are non-existent.”

                              The Freedom has spent much of the past year undergoing an overhaul and a series of repairs, most notably a period in drydock in March and April to fix a broken shaft seal that resulted in minor flooding. The unscheduled repairs meant the crew had fewer opportunities to take their ship to sea.

                              “This is a process,” Cmdr. Jason Salata, a Navy spokesman in San Diego, said of the inspections. “The crew has to prove to us they’ve met the requirements that they can proceed forward and conduct the material inspection with the Board of Inspection and Survey” — known throughout the Navy as INSURV.

                              The Type Commander Material Inspection (TMIT) reviews were instituted by the Naval Surface Force last summer, Salata said, to better prepare ships for INSURV inspections.

                              “We want to provide a maximum level of confidence in the ship’s ability to conduct a material inspection,” he said.

                              Since the TMITs were begun, Salata said, six of 11 ships — including the Freedom — received the “high risk/no-go” rating. Three were rated “medium risk” and only two ships were dubbed “ready to proceed.”

                              The inspections for three of the high risk ships were rescheduled, while two successfully passed INSURVs.

                              Many of the degraded areas on the Freedom “are already in the process of being corrected,” Salata said, and the TMI team is scheduled to go back on the ship later this week to assess its progress.

                              The Freedom’s INSURV inspection currently is scheduled for May 22 to 24 at San Diego.

                              “There will be three underway rehearsals with Freedom before the INSURV,” Salata said. “There’s a bit of resiliency that needs to be put in there. That’s why practice helps.”

                              The TMIT review did not raise alarm bells for the director of surface warfare at the Pentagon.

                              “I think the results point to some of the uniqueness associated with LCS,” Rear Adm. Thomas Rowden told reporters on a conference call Wednesday. “There are also contractor personnel to demonstrate [functions] as well as ship’s force.

                              “I am fully confident the ship and contractors and Surface Force are going to address these issues,” Rowden declared.

                              Rowden and Rear Adm. Jim Murdoch, program executive officer for the LCS program, spoke to reporters about recent developments with the LCS program.

                              The Independence (LCS 2) reached its new homeport of San Diego on May 2, joining up with the Freedom, while the Fort Worth (LCS 3) successfully completed acceptance trials on May 4 on Lake Michigan.

                              “We were very pleased to be able to present a complete ship,” Murdoch said of the Fort Worth, built by Fincantieri Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wisc., under prime contractor Lockheed Martin.

                              “We tested in the Great Lakes everything we could test,” he said. “We demonstrated full power very smoothly. The number of trials cards” — major problem areas needing attention — “was reduced from over 50 on LCS 1 to less than 10 on LCS 3.

                              “We are very pleased with how LCS 3 is shaping up,” Murdoch said.

                              “That the trial is such a success is just indicative of how we are moving forward with the program,” declared Rowden.

                              Both officers were asked about repeated criticisms of the LCS program in the press and from some members of Congress.

                              “We are confident of the past successes on LCS,” Rowden said. “The Navy routinely expects issues to arise from first-of-class ships. Repairs are made as required. This also allows us to incorporate changes in follow on ships and we’re doing that.

                              “Sure there’s criticism, and it kind of helps us sharpen what we need to do,” he added.

                              “I expect a lot of criticism because we’re different,” Murdoch said. “We’re modular. People say it isn’t adequately defensible, but I think differently. … We can put things in the mission package without having to change the ship. That’s a tough message for people to accept.

                              “I accept the criticism,” Murdoch said. “I welcome it.”

                              ———

                              TEXT OF THE MAY 7 TYPE COMMANDER MATERIAL INSPECTION REPORT ON THE USS FREEDOM. SOME EDITS HAVE BEEN MADE FOR CLARITY.
                              TYPE COMMANDER MATERIAL INSPECTION

                              R 071920Z MAY 12

                              FM COMNAVSURFPAC SAN DIEGO CA

                              TO USS FREEDOM

                              INFO COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI

                              COMNAVSURFPAC SAN DIEGO CA

                              PRESINSURV VIRGINIA BEACH VA

                              COMLCSRON SAN DIEGO CA

                              COMLCSRON ONE

                              BT

                              UNCLAS

                              MSGID/GENADMIN/COMNAVSURFPAC SAN DIEGO CA/0805/MAY//

                              SUBJ/TYCOM MATERIAL INSPECTION REPORT FOR USS FREEDOM (LCS 1)//

                              REF/A/MSGID:DOC/INSURV/28FEB2008/4370.1//

                              REF/B/MSGID:DOC/INSURV/06JUN2008/4730.3//

                              REF/C/MSGID:DOC/COMUSFLTFORCOM/11MAR2008/4790.3//

                              REF/D/MSGID:DOC/INSURV/26OCT1999/4730.11//

                              REF/E/MSGID:DOC/OPNAV/26DEC2007/5090.1//

                              REF/F/MSGID:DOC/OPNAV/30MAY2007/5100.19//

                              REF/G/MSGID:DOC/NAVSEA/15APR2004/9593.2//

                              REF/H/MSGID:DOC/CNSP/22SEP2011//

                              NARR/REF A IS INSURVINST 4730.1 SERIES, MATERIAL INSPECTIONS OF SURFACE SHIPS.

                              REF B IS INSURVINST 4730.3 SERIES, TRIALS OF SURFACE SHIPS.

                              REF C IS COMUSFLTFORCOMINST 4790.3 SERIES, JOINT FLEET MAINTENANCE MANUAL (VOL IV).

                              REF D IS INSURVINST 4730.11 SERIES, DOCUMENTATION OF DISCREPANCIES.

                              REF E IS OPNAVINST 5090.1 SERIES, ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES PROGRAM MANUAL.

                              REF F IS OPNAVINST 5100.19 SERIES, NAVY SAFETY AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH (SOH)

                              INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION PROCESS FOR OIL POLLUTION ABATEMENT (OPA) SYSTEMS IN U.S. NAVY SURFACE SHIPS AND CRAFT.

                              REF H IS CNSPINST 4730.2, TYCOM MATERIAL INSPECTION (TMI) PROCESS.//

                              POC/CANDELARIA, G.T./LCDR/UNIT:CNSP-N45/NAME:SAN DIEGO, CA

                              /EMAIL:GILBERT.CANDELARIA(AT)NAVY.MIL/TEL:619-556-1219//

                              GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. A TMI WAS CONDUCTED ON USS FREEDOM (LCS 1) IN SAN DIEGO, CA FROM 3-5 MAY, 2012. THE TMI TEAM (TMIT) ASSESSES FREEDOM AS A HIGH RISK TO PASS THEIR SPECIAL TRIAL AND DOES NOT RECOMMEND THE SHIP PROCEED TO THEIR SCHEDULED SPECIAL TRIAL UNTIL THE SHIP COMPLETES A SATISFACTORY RE-DEMONSTRATION.

                              2. SENIOR INSPECTOR COMMENTS: USS FREEDOM (LCS 1) IS EVALUATED AS A "NO-GO" AND IS NOT RECOMMENDED TO PROCEED WITH THE SCHEDULED SPECIAL TRIAL (ST). FREEDOM'S CREW AND CONTRACTORS WERE NOT PREPARED FOR THE INSPECTION. BOTH ENTITIES WERE UNFAMILIAR WITH THE CONDUCT OF INSURV MATERIAL CHECKS. EXECUTION OF THE SOE WAS VERY POOR. THERE WAS CONFUSION BETWEEN CONTRACTOR AND CREW RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF EQUIPMENT CHECKS. THE INSPECTION EXPERIENCE LEVEL FOR THE MAJORITY OF THE CREW IS LOW ALTHOUGH THEY DID DEMONSTRATE A GOOD POSITIVE ATTITUDE. THE CREW AND CONTRACTORS NEED TO CONTINUE TO FAMILIARIZE THEMSELVES WITH THE SHIP'S EQUIPMENT, OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES, IMPROVE IN PRESENTATION/DEMONSTRATIONS AND AGGRESSIVELY MANAGE/COORDINATE SOE. THE SHIP WAS CLEAN. SEVERAL AREAS REQUIRE PRESERVATION. SAFETY PROGRAMS ABOARD THE SHIP ARE NON-EXISTENT. THE SHIP DID DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO SELF-ASSESS. HOWEVER, THEY ARE NOT AGGRESSIVELY REPORTING AND PURSUING RESOLUTION OF THE DEFICIENCIES THEY HAVE IDENTIFIED.

                              3. DEMONSTRATION RESULTS:

                              A. FULL POWER-RED

                              B. QUICK REVERSAL ASTERN-RED

                              C. QUICK REVERSAL AHEAD-RED

                              D. STEERING-GREEN

                              E. ANCHOR DROP-YELLOW

                              F. AFFF TEST-RED

                              G. SD DTE-YELLOW

                              H. LONG RANGE AIR SEARCH- GREEN

                              I. 57MM LIVE FIRE-GREEN

                              4. FUNCTIONAL AREA RESULTS:

                              A. AVIATION-RED

                              B. COMMUNICATIONS-RED

                              C. INFO SYSTEMS-GREEN

                              D. NAVIGATION-YELLOW

                              E. OPERATIONS-RED

                              F. WEAPONS-YELLOW

                              G. AUXILIARIES-RED

                              H. ELECTRICAL-RED

                              I. MAIN PROPULSION-RED

                              J. DAMAGE CONTROL-RED

                              K. DECK-RED

                              L. ENVIR PROTECTION-YELLOW

                              M. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH-RED

                              N. MEDICAL-YELLOW

                              O. VENTILATION-YELLOW

                              P. HABITABILITY-GREEN

                              Q. SUPPLY-YELLOW

                              R. ABILITY TO SELF-ASSESS-GREEN

                              S. 3M SPOTCHECKS-RED

                              T. ATIS DATABASE-NOT DEMONSTRATED

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                              • Thought I'd attach this thread since it's sort of related. It shows USS Independence going through the Panama Canal when she was en route to San Diego back in mid-April.

                                http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/nav...e-lcs-2-a.html

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