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  • I wonder how many marines would be put aboard a ship that only has 40 sailors?

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    • Originally posted by surfgun View Post
      I wonder how many marines would be put aboard a ship that only has 40 sailors?
      I think one possible use might be a forward arming and refueling point lillipad for UH-1Y and AH-1Z operating from a more distant amphib. How many would be needed?
      Last edited by JRT; 09 Dec 11,, 13:10.
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      • More on ONR's priorites... some of which relates to the littorals.


        ONR Maps Priorities For S&T Dollars

        Aerospace Daily & Defense Report

        12/12/2011

        The U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) will focus its spending more intently on the development of autonomous and unmanned systems, according to the agency’s recently released science and technology (S&T) strategic plan.

        “Increased proliferation of inexpensive lethal threats targeting individual warfighters and high-value assets, combined with continued rapid advances in computing, power and energy, robotics, sensors and position guidance technologies drives the requirement to augment expensive manned systems with less expensive, unmanned fully autonomous systems that can operate in all required domains,” ONR says in its new plan.

        The strategic plan includes eight other focus areas, including assuring access to the maritime battlespace. “The complexity of the littoral battlespace and changing environmental conditions, such as increased open water in the Arctic Ocean, demands advanced high-resolution environmental observation and prediction capabilities,” ONR says. “Innovative approaches (not requiring perfect knowledge) to modeling and simulations of complex environments, including interactions with systems, form a key part of this challenge.”

        ONR also wants to hone expeditionary and irregular warfare to “deliver enhanced capabilities across all warfighting functions in order to enable littoral access and crisis response across the range of military operations. These investments will facilitate sea-based, decentralized operations by high-performing, highly lethal, network-enabled small units capable of aggregating and disaggregating to meet the operational requirements of the most austere and complex environments. Specific areas for increased capability development include mobility, communication, sustainment and training.”

        ONR wants to help establish information dominance as well. “Spectrum dominance is a key component,” ONR says, “which includes efforts that focus on sensors, electronic warfare and electronics, and employing these sensors and capabilities to understand and shape the battlespace, as well as disrupting the threat’s sensors from doing the same.”

        ONR also is looking for better platform design and survivability. “The development of design tools capable of rapidly analyzing and evaluating novel air, ground and sea/coastal/riverine platforms with advanced system performance characteristics is a high priority,” the office says.

        Power and energy improvements also have made ONR’s priorities list as the agency looks to “increase naval forces’ freedom of action through energy security and efficient power systems” and increase “combat capability through high energy and pulsed power systems.”

        ONR also wants to enhance the Navy’s ability for power projection and integrated defense. “This focus area strives for significant enhancements in naval time-sensitive strike capabilities,” ONR says.
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        • Personally, I hate S&T's, because if they aren't done in co-operation with the users and aimed towards what they want (as opposed to generating volume in some "good idea" fairies yearly plan), then they are just an aspirational bucket list with little relevance to force development.
          Linkeden:
          http://au.linkedin.com/pub/gary-fairlie/1/28a/2a2
          http://cofda.wordpress.com/

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          • Looks like Indy will be in Florida through the winter.

            LCS Independence staying in Florida, for now

            BY CHRISTOPHER P. CAVAS - STAFF WRITER | NAVY TIMES
            WEDNESDAY DEC 21, 2011

            All of the Navy’s new Littoral Combat Ships are to be homeported at San Diego, where most of the shoreside support for the new type of ship is concentrated. The first LCS, Freedom, has been based there since spring 2010, and the second ship, Independence, was to have made its way west by now.

            But Independence is still in Florida, splitting its time between the Atlantic coast base at Mayport and the Naval Surface Warfare Center along the Gulf Coast Panhandle in Panama City.

            The ship has been carrying out an extensive series of tests and trials of gear associated with the mine warfare mission module, and more work remains to be done before heading west. As a result, the move to San Diego likely won’t happen until at least March.

            A chief factor according to Rear Adm. Jim Murdoch, head of the LCS effort at the Naval Sea Systems Command, was “my desire to make sure we got through a very comprehensive developmental test for the mission package.”

            Murdoch said Wednesday the delay was not due to any problem with the ship itself.

            Panama City, Murdoch said, “is where the warfare experts are.” And for mine warfare, he noted, “the bottom type is understood.”

            Other factors included a recent crew turnover — the ship swaps Blue-Gold crews about every four months — and the passage last week of a defense appropriations bill for fiscal 2012.

            “We’re gratified that Congress has passed an appropriation bill,” Murdoch said. “That allows us to work much more efficiently. Now the schedule starts to clear up for us very nicely.”

            The Gold crew that just took over the ship will complete developmental testing in Florida, Murdoch said, then take the ship through the Panama Canal to southern California.

            The waterfront there, however, won’t be seeing the ship routinely pull in and out of port for awhile. Soon after arriving, the ship will enter dry dock for an extensive post-shakedown availability overhaul, expected to take several months.

            And here is some recent news about the RMMV, a snorkeling semi-submersible that has an attached deployable tethered UUV that will be operated from and tended by Indy class LCS.





            LCS Remote Minehunting System Reaches Reliability Milestone

            14:20 GMT, December 16, 2011 WASHINGTON | The Remote Minehunting System (RMS) completed the first of three phases of reliability testing Nov. 17, at the Lockheed Martin facilities off the coast of Palm Beach Florida.

            The system successfully completed more than 500 hours of mission testing, including conduct of 33 missions over the 5 month testing period with the Remote Multi Mission Vehicle (RMMV) operating with the AN/AQS-20A mine-hunting sonar. The tests validated reliability improvements made to the RMMV Design in this first reliability increment.

            "Initial analysis of the data indicates that we have met or surpassed all testing and program objectives and we obtained the required data needed to proceed to the next phase," said Steve Lose, program manager for the Remote Minehunting System Program.

            A critical component of the mine countermeasures mission package for the littoral combat ship class, RMS will provide an off-board mine reconnaissance capability, designed to conduct rapid reconnaissance of bottom and moored mines from the deep-water region to the very shallow water region. The RMS will aid in the determination of the presence of mines and help identify safe routes or operating areas around potential minefields.

            The RMS is a combination of the RMMV, coupled with the towed AN/AQS-20A mine-hunting sonar system. The RMMV is an unmanned, autonomous, semi-submersible, high endurance, low-visibility system that will be operated and maintained from the LCS. The vehicle has self-contained control, propulsion, power, and navigation. The AN/AQS-20A sonar system is designed to detect, classify, and localize mine-like contacts and identify bottom mines.

            The program will now begin preparing for the next phase of in water reliability testing, scheduled to commence in fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012. RMS will also be an integral part of ongoing LCS mine countermeasures mission package developmental testing scheduled for first-quarter of fiscal year 2012.

            PEO LCS, an affiliated Program Executive Office of Naval Sea Systems Command, provides a single Program Executive responsible for acquiring and sustaining mission capabilities of the Littoral Combat Ship class, beginning with procurement, and ending with fleet employment and sustainment. The combined capability of LCS and LCS mission systems is designed to dominate the littoral battle space and provide U. S. forces with assured access to coastal areas.

            ----Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships, Public Affairs Office

            U.S. Navy Factfile: Remote Multi-Mission Vehicle - (RMMV)

            Description The Remove Multi-Mission Vehicle - RMMV is an unmanned, autonomous semi-submersible, high endurance, low-visible system that will be operated and maintained from the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). RMMV will be capable of both line-of-sight and over-the-horizon operations. The off board vehicle will have self-contained control, propulsion, power, and navigation features. As many as two RMMVs may be operated from the LCS simultaneously. It will be capable of real-time communications of mine reconnaissance sensor data as well as automatic search and recording modes. The RMMV will tow the AN/AQS-20A minehunting sonar system for detection, classification, and localization of mine-like contacts and mine identification of bottom mines. The host ship, will be equipped to conduct data processing, display, recording, and to communicate tactical mine reconnaissance data to other Naval forces. Fueled for long endurance, the RMMV’s diesel marine engine and high-efficiency propulsor will drive the 7 meter long vehicle at speeds exceeding 16 knots. A streamlined snorkel/mast, which is the vehicle’s only visible feature above the water, draws air into the engine and provides a platform for RF antennas and an obstacle avoidance system. The RMMV’s high coverage search rate can find mines in deep and shallow water with high probability. The RMMV can be pre-programmed to perform autonomously or be manually controlled via data link. The RMMV will be capable of being off board for greater than 24 hours. To preserve fuel, if rapid recovery is not possible, the RMMV can “sleep” until it receives new instructions.

            Background Naval mines pose a significant threat to U.S. and allied shipping, particularly in navigation choke points and transit lanes. The RMMV, as the workhorse of the Remote Minehunting System (RMS) which also includes the towed AN/AQS-20A minehunting sonar system, shall be capable of accomplishing Mine Counter-Measure (MCM) missions in forward fleet operating areas by employing shipboard equipment that allows integration, deployment, and operation of the individual sensor systems from a shipboard environment. RMMV, as part of the RMS, will satisfy the U.S. Navy’s need for an organic (off-board) surface ship mine reconnaissance capability in order to conduct rapid reconnaissance of bottom and moored mines from the deep-water region to the very shallow water region, and determine the presence of mines and safe routes or operating areas around potential minefields.

            Point Of Contact Office of Corporate Communication (SEA 00D) Naval Sea Systems Command Washington, D.C. 20376

            General Characteristics, Remote Multi-Mission Vehicle - (RMMV)
            Contractor: Lockheed Martin – Riviera Beach, FL.
            Date Deployed: A reliability growth program has been fully implemented to support achievement of Milestone-C review in FY 2014.
            Unit Cost: Approximately $12 million (in 2006 constant year dollars)
            Length: 23 ft. Diameter: 4 ft.
            Weight: 14,500 lb. average (including AN/AQS-20A)

            Last Update: 28 November 2011

            Last edited by JRT; 24 Dec 11,, 01:42. Reason: added another news report
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            • Look what is coming off of the production line.
              Navy News Service - Eye on the Fleet

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              • Originally posted by JRT View Post
                I think one possible use might be a forward arming and refueling point lillipad for UH-1Y and AH-1Z operating from a more distant amphib. How many would be needed?
                LOL...Lillipad...haven't heard that term in a loooong time!

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                • Navy Christens Littoral Combat Ship Coronado


                  From Department of Defense

                  WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The Navy will christen the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Coronado, Saturday, Jan. 14, during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony in Mobile, Ala.

                  The Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development & Acquisition, Sean Stackley, will deliver the principal address at the ceremony. Susan Keith will serve as the ship's sponsor. Additionally, Keith helped launch the Coronado Historical Association's "Home of a Naval Aviator" sign project and grew up with her father and stepfather serving in the Navy. Vice Adm. Stanhope C. Ring, her father, was a pilot who commanded an aircraft carrier air group during the Battle of Midway during World War II. Her stepfather, Rear Adm. Aaron Putnam "Put" Storrs III, belonged to the Navy's first aerial acrobatic team, which was the forerunner of the Blue Angels. The ceremony will be highlighted by Keith breaking a bottle of champagne across the bow to formally christen the ship, which is a time-honored maritime tradition.

                  The ship's name recognizes the city of Coronado, Calif., and honors the city's deep ties to the U.S. Navy. Coronado has been home to Naval Air Station North Island and Naval Amphibious Base, since 1917. Two previous ships have been named after this city: USS Coronado, a Tacoma-class patrol frigate, earned four battle stars for supporting landings in New Guinea and Leyte during World War II and the USS Coronado, an Austin-class amphibious transport dock later re-designated as an auxiliary command ship, served as flagship for the Third Fleet and was decommissioned in 2006.

                  Designated LCS 4, Coronado is an innovative surface combatant designed to operate in littoral seas and shallow water to counter mines, submarines and fast surface craft threats in coastal regions. The ship is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep. Coronado will address a critical capabilities gap in the littorals and conduct the Navy's mission to enhance maritime security by deterring hostility, maintaining a forward presence, projecting power and maintaining sea control.

                  A fast, agile, and high-technology surface combatant, Coronado will be a platform for the launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. To meet increased demand for mission-tailored packages, its modular design will allow the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine countermeasures, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis. The LCS class ships have the ability to swap out mission packages in a matter of days - adapting as the tactical situation demands. The modular approach allows the Navy to incorporate new and improved systems into the fleet as advanced technologies mature, providing flexibility and evolving capability.

                  Coronado will be manned by two rotational crews, Blue and Gold, similar to the rotational crews assigned to large submarines. These core crews are augmented by one of the three types of mission package crews and an aviation detachment. The commanding officer of the Blue crew will be Cmdr. John Kochendorfer, from Dana Point, Calif. The commanding officer of the Gold crew will be Cmdr. Michael "Shawn" Johnston, from North Carolina. After commissioning, the ship will be homeported in San Diego, Calif.

                  Constructed by General Dynamics in the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Ala., Coronado is the second of the Independence-variant in the LCS class.

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                  • Heard about this a couple of days ago; it looks funny without the mast and the (operational) Phalanx.
                    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

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                    • Originally posted by Stitch View Post
                      Heard about this a couple of days ago; it looks funny without the mast and the (operational) Phalanx.
                      Realized about a minute after I posted that you had hit that topic earlier. ...sorry. Agree that it looks funny in that semi complete stage. I caught this the other day where a VP from Lockheed stated that from here on out the Lockheed version will be "cookie cutter" http://www.dodbuzz.com/2012/01/10/sn...-cutter-phase/ Sure hope thats not wishful thinking. LCS is not without serious concerns, but every time I see a photo of a FFG looking like its on life support, I wish they would build these faster.

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                      • Originally posted by HKDan View Post
                        Realized about a minute after I posted that you had hit that topic earlier. ...sorry. Agree that it looks funny in that semi complete stage. I caught this the other day where a VP from Lockheed stated that from here on out the Lockheed version will be "cookie cutter" http://www.dodbuzz.com/2012/01/10/sn...-cutter-phase/ Sure hope thats not wishful thinking. LCS is not without serious concerns, but every time I see a photo of a FFG looking like its on life support, I wish they would build these faster.

                        The USN has FFG's in reserve, they dont look that bad at all just alot of milage. IMO, I bet several could be refinished and serve a few more years. The question is, is it worth it.
                        Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

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                        • Originally posted by Dreadnought View Post
                          The USN has FFG's in reserve, they dont look that bad at all just alot of milage. IMO, I bet several could be refinished and serve a few more years. The question is, is it worth it.
                          IMHO, no. Its not that I think the LCS is a perfect design, but compared to the FFGs that are in the fleet today, I far prefer the LCS and its potential for greater flexibility. I really do hope that the Navy's choice to proceed with the split buy proves wise and that these ships enter the fleet asafp.

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                          • nicer photos here


                            LCS 4 Coronado
                            Attached Files
                            “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

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                            • Lcs1
                              Attached Files
                              “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

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                              • Lcs 2
                                Attached Files
                                “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

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