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  • surfgun
    replied
    This article forcasts weeks of work. We shall see?

    http://news.usni.org/2015/12/14/litt...uld-last-weeks

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  • surfgun
    replied
    The thing is her next stop was to have been Mayport then off for San Diego. It is a good thing she broke down only 40 miles from the mouth of the Chesapeake and not 40 miles from the Panama Canal. So if she can not be fixed pier side at Little Creek, expect her to be towed onto and to spend the next few months at Norfolk Naval Shipyard.

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by surfgun View Post
    The USS Milwaukee, a ship the was built at a yard in Wisconsin, was also damaged and "repaired" and delivered late by the same yard has broken down and has to be towed into port!

    http://www.stripes.com/news/navy/nav...t-sea-1.383637
    One step forward and two steps back.

    Can't wait until the new FF and large combatant are built! Who knows what kind of assbackwardness we'll encounter.

    Maybe Zumwalt will come back from sea trials flying a broom and we can have some good news for a chance.

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  • surfgun
    replied
    The USS Milwaukee, a ship the was built at a yard in Wisconsin, was also damaged and "repaired" and delivered late by the same yard has broken down and has to be towed into port!

    http://www.stripes.com/news/navy/nav...t-sea-1.383637

    Leave a comment:


  • Tankersteve
    replied
    Besides the price increase for the sensors and weapons, what is the downside to this move? Are they losing the modular spaces to additional crew stations and increasing crew compartments for a larger crew? Are their weight limitations affecting stability?

    If you threw in the Mk46 30mm guns from the anti-small craft/swarm package and a Mk32 torpedo system, you no longer have a niche role ship, but instead a very capable multi-purpose ship. So what are we giving up? Hangar bays? Modular spaces? Potential speed? Or was the price such a tough nut to get beyond to get the numbers we desired?

    I know the ship doesn't have the same survivability standards or damage control systems of a larger Navy vessel. But I wouldn't be as anxious about a loved one on these frigate-looking vessels (or at least feel that they could give as good as they got) that at least have a serious punch to go with their speed and aviation systems.

    Tankersteve

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  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by kato View Post
    The ship will have CEROS-200 x-band illuminators for ESSM.

    TRS-4D is specifically built towards a theater-wide high target track number, i.e. full control of 1000+ targets in a 200-km-diameter theater - in the German version with fixed arrays and passing thru to a ANCS CMS; not sure if COMBATSS-21 on LCS/MMSC supports the same out of the box.
    Interesting. Thanks for the clarification.

    Leave a comment:


  • kato
    replied
    Originally posted by JRT View Post
    Or am I missing something?
    The ship will have CEROS-200 x-band illuminators for ESSM.

    TRS-4D is specifically built towards a theater-wide high target track number, i.e. full control of 1000+ targets in a 200-km-diameter theater - in the German version with fixed arrays and passing thru to a ANCS CMS; not sure if COMBATSS-21 on LCS/MMSC supports the same out of the box.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    Originally posted by kato View Post
    The choice of TRS-4D is interesting.

    Looks like TRS-4D is C-band, no?

    Not using S- and/or X-band for midcourse uplinks to RIM-162 ESSM would seem like a loss of a rather useful capability. Or am I missing something?


    Airbus Defense and Space, Inc. Provides TRS-4D Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Radars to the Freedom Class Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)

    May 18, 2015 14:32 ET
    SOURCE: Airbus Defense and Space, Inc.

    http://www.marketwired.com/press-rel...rs-2020861.htm

    Programmable TRS-4D Naval Radars Support Improved LCS Lethality, Self-Defense and Situation Awareness

    HERNDON, VA--(Marketwired - May 18, 2015) - Airbus Defense and Space, Inc. is now under contract with its affiliate, Airbus Defence and Space GmbH, to provide an additional TRS-4D naval radar for the U.S. Navy's Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program through Freedom Class LCS prime contractor, Lockheed Martin. The radar is planned to go aboard LCS-21 following the already planned installations of TRS-4D aboard LCS-17 and LCS-19.

    The TRS-4D radar for LCS is a rotating version of the Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) fixed panel TRS-4D radar currently going aboard the German F-125 class frigates. It combines mechanical and electronic azimuth scanning to achieve fast generation of target tracks.

    System characteristics of the TRS-4D are an excellent match for the environment faced by LCS and its evolution to a frigate. The radar's AESA technology delivers increased sensitivity to detect smaller targets with greater accuracy, as well as faster track generation to give LCS more time to react to advanced threats.

    This software-defined radar is programmable by the customer, enabling changes to radar characteristics to match future threats that evolve over the life of the ship. The ability to customize the characteristics of the TRS-4D helps enable LCS to evolve through its service life and adapt to evolving required operational capabilities and projected operational environments in an affordable manner.

    "Superior performance and adaptability for the future are key characteristics of the TRS-4D radar," said Mike Cosentino, President of Airbus Defense and Space, Inc. "It supports the LCS evolution to a frigate, meets current and future threats, and can readily be adapted to change over the service life of the ship."

    Combining multiple capabilities within a single radar is one way that TRS-4D contributes to the affordability of LCS. Employing state of the art AESA technology, the TRS-4D is a three-dimensional, multi-mode naval radar for surveillance, target acquisition, self-defense, gunfire support, and aircraft control. It automatically detects and tracks all types of air and sea targets, alleviating crew workload requirements. LCS affordability is further enhanced by the reliability of the TRS-4D's solid state system design, keeping maintenance costs low and further contributing to lower LCS life cycle costs.

    Littoral combat ships are fast, agile surface combatants optimized for operating in the highly trafficked near-shore regions of the world. Through its innovative modular design, LCS can be reconfigured for surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and mine countermeasures in the near term, and adapt its capabilities for changing threats and scenarios that will occur over its service life.

    To learn more about the Airbus Group's TRS-4D multi-mode naval radar system, visit us at http://northamerica.airbus-group.com.../Overview.html

    About Airbus Defense and Space, Inc.

    Airbus Defense and Space, Inc., headquartered in Herndon, Va., offers a broad array of advanced solutions to meet U.S. military and commercial requirements, including fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, homeland security systems, public safety communications, defense electronics and avionics, and threat detection systems. For the LCS program, the company has delivered all AN/SPS-75 radars on time and within budget and is committed to the same high standards for the TRS-4D. Airbus Defense and Space, Inc. is a division of Airbus Group, Inc., the U.S.-based operation of Airbus Group, a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services.

    About Airbus Group, Inc.

    Airbus Group, Inc. is the U.S.-based operation of Airbus Group, a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services. Airbus Group contributes more than $14.4 billion to the U.S. economy annually and supports over 245,000 American jobs through its network of suppliers.

    About Airbus Defence and Space GmbH

    Airbus Defence and Space is a division of Airbus Group formed by combining the business activities of Cassidian, Astrium and Airbus Military. The new division is Europe's number one defence and space enterprise, the second largest space business worldwide and among the top ten global defence enterprises.


    TRS-4D™ (AESA technology) Multi-mode Naval Radar

    http://northamerica.airbus-group.com.../Overview.html

    TRS-4D™ is Airbus Defense and Space, Inc.’s latest offering in the C-Band (NATO G-Band) multi-mode naval radar family. It is available with a single face rotating antenna and also as a four fixed-panel configuration.

    Using Gallium Nitride Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) sensor technology with multiple digitally formed beams, the new generation TRS-4D™ opens a new dimension for maritime missions that face advance threats with its increased sensitivity and ability to rapidly generate tracks.

    The single panel rotating version uses an innovative combination of electronic scanning technology and mechanical rotation, to paint contacts more often than radars that only rotate mechanically. This allows for unprecedented surveillance and unmatched threat detection and tracking performance to extend mission success and platform survivability. TRS-4D™ supports the countering of conventional and asymmetric threats.

    To ensure that current and emerging operational needs are covered, the new radar offers the following capabilities:
    •Outstanding reaction time. Supports survivability and lethality. Fast track initiation and confirmation. Superior detection of low-signature air and surface targets. Evaluation of threats based on proven, reliable classification strategies. Compatible with a variety of fire and forget weapons.
    •Advanced high-priority targeting. Accurate tracking of small, fast-moving targets and countering of asymmetric threats. Intensified threat surveillance for high-priority areas when tactical situation warrants.
    •Network enabled capabilities. Delivery of new capabilities for co-operative operations, such as unprecedented cued search and cued track.
    •High operational availability in extended missions. Use of highly reliable technology, designed for graceful degradation, eliminates a single point of failure. Supported by the same team that supports the market leader in multi-mode naval radars.
    •Designed for today and tomorrow. Flexible software-defined radar management, programmable by the customer if desired. Open standards, substitution of customer processing possible. Adaptable for emerging mission needs throughout a ship’s lifecycle.
    •Lower overall weight than previous systems, allows ships to recover reserve buoyancy that can be used to support other capabilities.

    TRS-4D™ enables operational capabilities in both blue water and littoral environments.

    Functional Capabilities
    •3D air volume surveillance with fast target alert
    •High range resolution surface surveillance
    •Target designation to combat management system for AAW and ASuW
    •Surface gun fire control with splash detection
    •Ship-controlled helicopter approach (SCA) support
    •Jammer detection, tracking and suppression
    •Cued search with enhanced detection performance for a dedicated sector
    •Cued track with high-accuracy target tracking for missile guidance
    •Sector scanning with non-rotating antenna
    •Target classification
    •Integrated IFF
    •Easy integration with various combat management systems

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  • Stitch
    replied
    Originally posted by JA Boomer View Post
    Wow. An LCS with VLS for ESSM, Harpoon launchers, and a 3" deck gun. An actually frigate! Sounds like a good ship to me. Beware the folly of turning a under-armed, under-manned tin can into a warship I suppose...
    I'm thinking the NSM would be a better fit for the LCS; the Harpoon is getting a little "long in the tooth", even the Blk. III . . .

    Leave a comment:


  • kato
    replied
    The choice of TRS-4D is interesting.

    Originally posted by jlvfr View Post
    Four ships for 11.25 billion... plus whatever overuns occur... that's over 2.5 billion per ship... they'd be better of buying some Arleigh Burke-class ships...
    With that layout, electronics and armament? It's the smaller brother of the F125. For around twice the pure procurement cost per ship. Don't forget the 11.25 billion include support costs.
    Last edited by kato; 04 Nov 15,, 19:16.

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  • jlvfr
    replied
    Four ships for 11.25 billion... plus whatever overuns occur... that's over 2.5 billion per ship... they'd be better of buying some Arleigh Burke-class ships...

    Leave a comment:


  • JA Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by JRT View Post
    I haven't seen this mentioned here yet, so here is some more related news.
    (gets VLS, but no 5-inch gun)
    Wow. An LCS with VLS for ESSM, Harpoon launchers, and a 3" deck gun. An actually frigate! Sounds like a good ship to me. Beware the folly of turning a under-armed, under-manned tin can into a warship I suppose...

    Leave a comment:


  • JRT
    replied
    I haven't seen this mentioned here yet, so here is some more related news.
    (gets VLS, but no 5-inch gun)

    Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Multi-Mission Surface Combatant (MMSC) Ships

    http://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales...ant-mmsc-ships

    Media/Public Contact: pm-cpa@state.gov
    Transmittal No: 15-68

    WASHINGTON, Oct. 20, 2015 - The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for Multi-Mission Surface Combatant (MMSC) Ships and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $11.25 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on October 19, 2015.

    The Government of Saudi Arabia has requested a naval modernization program to include the sale of Multi-Mission Surface Combatant (MMSC) ships and program office support. The Multi-Mission Surface Combatant program will consist of:
    • Four (4) MMSC ships (a derivative of the Freedom Variant of the U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Class) that incorporate five (5) COMBATSS-21 Combat Management Systems (four (4) installed, one (1) spare) with five (5) TRS-4D Radars (four (4) installed, one (1) spare)
    • Five (5) Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) (Mode 4- and Mode 5-capable) UPX-29 (four (4) installed, one (1) spare)
    • Five (5) Compact Low Frequency Active Passive Variable Depth Sonar (four (4) installed, one (1) spare)
    • Eight (8) MK-41 Vertical Launch Systems (VLS) (two (2) eight-cell assemblies per ship for 16 cells per hull)
    • Five-hundred thirty-two (532) tactical RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles (ESSM) (one hundred twenty-eight (128) installed, twenty (20) test and training rounds, three hundred eighty-four (384) spares)
    • Five (5) AN/SWG-l (V) Harpoon Ship Command Launch Control Systems (four (4) installed (one (1) per ship), one (1) spare)
    • Eight (8) Harpoon Shipboard Launchers (two (2) installed four-tube assemblies per ship)
    • Forty-eight (48) RGM-84 Harpoon Block II Missiles (thirty-two (32) installed, sixteen (16) test and training rounds)
    • Five (5) MK-15 Mod 31 SeaRAM Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) (four (4) installed, one (1) spare)
    • One-hundred eighty-eight (188) RIM 116C Block II Rolling Airframe Missiles (RAM) (forty-four (44) installed, twelve (12) test and training rounds, one hundred thirty-two (132) spares)
    • Five (5) MK-75 76mm OTO Melara Gun Systems (four (4) installed, one (1) spare)
    • Forty-eight (48) 50-caliber machine guns (forty (40) installed (ten (10) per ship), eight (8) spares); ordnance; and Selective Availability Anti-Spoofing Module (SAASM) Global Positioning System/Precise Positioning Service (GPS/PPS) navigation equipment


    Also included in this sale in support of the MMSC are: study, design and construction of operations; support and training facilities; spare and repair parts; support and test equipment; communications equipment employing Link 16 equipment; Fire Control System/Ceros 200 Sensor and Illuminator; 20mm Narwhal Gun; Nixie AN/SLQ-25A Surface Ship Torpedo Defense System; MK-32 Surface Vessel Torpedo Tubes; WBR-2000 Electronic Support Measure and Threat Warning System; Automatic Launch of Expendables (ALEX) Chaff and Decoy-Launching System; ARC-210 Radios; Combined Enterprise Regional Information Exchange System (CENTRIXS); Automated Digital Network System; publications and technical documentation; personnel training and training equipment; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support.

    In addition, this case will provide overarching program office support for the SNEP II to include: U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support, and other related elements of program support to meet necessities for program execution. The estimated value of MDE is $4.3 billion. The total estimated cost is $11.25 billion.

    This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security goals of the United States by helping to improve the security of a strategic regional partner, which has been, and continues to be, an important force for political stability and economic progress in the Middle East. This acquisition will enhance the stability and maritime security in the sea areas around the Arabian Peninsula and support strategic objectives of the United States.

    The proposed sale will provide Saudi Arabia with an increased ability to meet current and future maritime threats from enemy weapon systems. The Multi-Mission Surface Combatant ships will provide protection-in-depth for critical industrial infrastructure and for the sea lines of communication. Saudi Arabia will use the enhanced capability to keep pace with the rapid advances in technology and to remain a viable U.S. coalition partner in the region.

    The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

    The principal contractor for the Multi-Mission Surface Combatant will be Lockheed Martin Corporation of Bethesda, Maryland. There are no known offset agreements in connection with this potential sale.

    Implementation of this proposed sale will require the assignment of additional U.S. Government and/or contractor representatives to Saudi Arabia.

    There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

    This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

    All questions regarding this proposed Foreign Military Sale should be directed to the State Department's Bureau of Political Military Affairs, Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, pm-cpa@state.gov.
    Last edited by JRT; 04 Nov 15,, 15:24.

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  • gunnut
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    LOL yep, actually 115 meters according to Wiki but close enough. The author took meters figure, called it feet and then converted from there back to meters.

    Ah well :-D
    Did he work on Mars Climate Orbiter?

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  • HKDan
    replied
    I have to say that I am rather surprised to see how quickly this is going to happen. I know the need is pressing, verging on desperate, but OTH missiles on deployed LCS within the next 12 months is a couple of years faster than I have ever seen this capability mentioned in print. Its Chris Cavas too, so the source is pretty good.

    LCS To Get Missiles for Next Deployment

    http://www.defensenews.com/story/def...navy/74477482/

    WASHINGTON — The US Navy’s push to increase the lethality of the littoral combat ship (LCS) is getting a major and somewhat unexpected boost with word that an over-the-horizon (OTH) surface-to-surface missile will be installed on-board the next LCSs to deploy.

    Rear Adm. Pete Fanta, director of surface warfare at the Pentagon, issued a directive on Sept. 17 calling for the installation of an unspecified OTH missile aboard the Freedom and the Coronado, the next two LCSs scheduled for deployment. The Freedom is to deploy to the Western Pacific during the first quarter of calendar year 2016, while the Coronado is to follow in the second or third quarter.

    “The objective is to install the OTH missile system aboard all in-service LCS deploying to forward operating stations starting in fiscal year 2016,” Fanta wrote in the directive, “as well as on all under-construction LCS prior to their commissioning ceremonies.”

    The LCS has been without a surface-to-surface missile since the cancellation in 2010 of the Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) missile, a program managed by the US Army that would have provided LCS with a significant weapon. Ever since, the service has been searching for a suitable replacement. A shipboard launch system for the Hellfire missile is being developed for smaller targets, but that weapon is unable to inflict significant damage on larger ships -- a role the OTH is meant to fill.

    An OTH weapon is to be included in the LCS frigate variant now under development. The Navy has issued a request for information to industry for the frigate missile, and a request for proposals is expected later this year, but no missile has yet been chosen.

    Fanta’s directive does not mention a specific missile, but it’s understood from sources that the missiles for the initial installations will be the Boeing Harpoon and Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM).

    The idea, sources confirmed, is to try out both kinds of missile on both LCS variants, each ship deploying with only one model of missile installed.

    The Harpoon is a tried-and-true weapon that has armed most US warships since the late 1970s. It is a normally mounted in launch canisters, usually grouped in a quad pack. Most ships carry two quad packs, for a total of eight weapons – the maximum number of weapons per ship specified in Fanta’s directive. Boeing has been at work to improve the weapon, in particular to give it longer range.

    The Norwegian-built NSM, by contrast, is not a US program of record and is not in service with any US platforms, although it is in service with the Norwegian Navy. It is the only naval strike missile to be fired from an LCS, however. In a simple demonstration test, a single missile box launcher was loaded aboard the Coronado and fired on Sept. 23, 2014. The launcher sat on a rudimentary platform exhausting over the ship’s flight deck, and the missile was not integrated into the Coronado’s combat system.

    Fanta’s directive, in fact, notes that “full integration with the LCS combat system is not required. A stand-alone console or computer terminal capable of consummating an engagement is sufficient for initial fielding.”

    The directive, to the Program Executive Officer for Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) and Program Executive Officer for Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS) at the Naval Sea Systems Command, calls for the installation of “the maximum number of missiles possible within the space, weight, power and cooling margins available. The initial design should be able to spiral to an eventual goal of eight missiles per ship.”

    The missile system chosen, Fanta stipulated, “must be technologically mature with a demonstrated range.”

    Fanta acknowledged in the directive that the missile installation on ships about to deploy is ahead of previous guidance, but noted the action is in line with moves to increase the lethality and survivability of the Navy’s small combatants.

    The first priority for the new LCS frigate, he noted, is for an OTH surface-to-surface missile capability.

    Numerous proposals have been provided by industry on how to fit missiles into the LCS designs. Lockheed Martin has offered vertical launch systems (VLS), usually in eight-cell groups, for the LCS 1 Freedom class, and such an installation is being provided on versions of the design approved for sale to Saudi Arabia.

    Austal USA, builder of the LCS 2 Independence class all-aluminum variant, has also offered designs that include VLS.

    Fanta, however, is said to prefer box launchers for LCS -- simpler, less costly and with less of an impact on a ship’s design. Drawbacks include the general inability to modify box launchers to accommodate improved or different missiles over the course of a ship’s service life.

    The Freedom – the oldest LCS in service – is preparing for its second deployment to the western Pacific, where it will relieve the Fort Worth. The Coronado will be making the first deployment for the Independence class, which has been focusing on developing the mine-countermeasure mission module.

    One element of the missile installation yet to be determined is how the shipboard system will be managed – either by the crew or the mission detachment that comes aboard to operate the modules.

    The OTH system will be considered part of the surface warfare package, a Navy source said, and might also be carried when the ship is fitted with the anti-submarine warfare package. Out of the question, however, is its use when the mine countermeasure module is embarked. The greater weight of the mine module, the source said, precludes carrying the missiles.

    It is also not clear what effect the directive will have on ships now under construction or set to enter service. The Milwaukee, third ship of the Freedom class, was accepted by the Navy on Oct. 16 and is to be formally commissioned Nov. 21 in a ceremony in her namesake city. The Jackson, third ship of the Independence class, was delivered to the Navy on Aug. 11 and is to be commissioned Dec. 5 in Gulfport, Mississippi.

    More ships are nearing completion both at Fincantieri Marinette Marine, which builds the Freedom-class ships in Marinette, Wisconsin, and at Austal USA, building Independence-class ships in Mobile, Alabama.
    Last edited by HKDan; 27 Oct 15,, 05:52.

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