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F/A-22 Raptor Makes First Public Flight

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  • F/A-22 Raptor Makes First Public Flight

    F/A-22 Raptor Makes First Public Flight at Edwards Air Show

    October 29, 2003

    By Airman 1st Class Matthew Dillier
    Air Force Flight Test Center Public Affairs

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AFMCNS) - The F/A-22 Raptor made its first public flight Oct. 25-26, making a few passes over the crowd gathered for the 2003 Edwards Open House and Air Show.

    "It represented a lot of work by the company and the government to showcase what is clearly going to be the air dominance fighter of the future," said Col. Joe Lanni, F/A-22 Combined Test Force director. "I'm very proud to be a participant."

    The F/A-22 Raptor, developed at Aeronautical Systems Center located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the replacement for the F-15 Eagle air-superiority fighter and will become operational early this century. It combines stealth design with the supersonic, highly maneuverable, dual-engine, long-range requirements of an air-to-air fighter, and it also will have an inherent air-to-ground capability, if needed, Air Force officials said.

    The F/A-22's integrated avionics gives it first-look, first-shot, first-kill capability officials said will guarantee United States air dominance for the next three decades. The Raptor first took to the air here for flight tests Sept. 7, 1997 and is currently undergoing additional testing.

    Officials said the F/A-22 came about to develop, field and support the next-generation, air-dominance fighter weapon system, and establish the standard for acquisition excellence.

    "We showed some of the jet's basic maneuverability and speeds," said Lanni. "This was just an opportunity to see this great machine in the air."

    According to Maj. Jim Dutton, a Raptor pilot, helped people see the aircraft's capabilities.

    "Since this is the 100th anniversary of powered flight, we wanted to get the Raptor in the airshow," said Dutton. "We wanted to show the public what a great jet we have."

    Lanni said this not only helped Edwards' partnership with the surrounding community, but the relationship with the Air Force and the Department of Defense as well.

    "The whole point of this program is to help our forces flow into enemy countries," said Lanni. "It's important for the Army soldiers and Marines on the ground. The sons and daughters who go into combat will have the best support and equipment there is."

    The Raptor was one of many aircraft that performed during the open house and air show.

    http://www.military.com/NewsContent?file=102903_FA22
    "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

  • #2
    THE INVISIBLE" BECOMES VISIBLE

    The radar boasts one principal plus: its ability to function in the meter-wave band makes it invulnerable to homing and anti-radar missiles effective in other wave-bands. Secondly, the radar can detect so-called "invisible" aircraft, including STEALTH technology planes.
    t is interesting to note that throughout its 78 year-long history, Nizhni Novgorod Television Plant has never kept a low profile, despite the fact that nearly 80% of the hardware it produced was ordered by the military. Contrary to usual procedures, this enterprise always had fairly famous names. The names changed, as did production. Whereas in Spring 1917, the Electrotechnical Works (the plant's first name) commemorated its birthday by producing military field and outpost telephone versions for the warring army, now the plant specializes in the production of unique meter-wave radar sets.
    The latest novelties, the radar sets, types 55Zh6-1 and 1L13-3, were shown twice, in 1992 and 1993, at Nizhni Novgorod
    International Fair and at MOSAEROSHOW exhibition in Moscow. They attracted the interest of experts at the recent exhibition of weaponry in Abu-Dhabi.
    Diagram depicting the operation of 55Zh6-1 and 1L13-3 meter-wave radar


    Times have changed and now the plant can openly demonstrate its weaponry and offer it for sale. Now, let us consider the
    specifics of the radars, which impressed the specialists, both Russian and foreign, and led them to be frequent guests at the
    plant ever since. The 55Zh6-1 is a high tech, ground-based, three-coordinate circular scanner set operating in the meter-wave band. It detects current (and future) airplanes, helicopters, cruise missiles, balloons and other air objects in the Diagram depicting the operation of 55Zh6-1 and 1L13-3 meter-wave radarface of the most intensive clutter and electronic countermeasures.

    The radar boasts one principal plus: its ability to function in the meter-wave band makes it invulnerable to homing and antiradar missiles effective in other wavebands. Secondly, the radar can detect so-called "invisible" aircraft, including STEALTH technology planes. Indeed, this aircraft's invisibility is based on itsspecial shape, which produces an extremely small signal return. In the meter-wave band used in radar technology, an aircraft's size is commensurate with wavelength, and its shape is no longer important. The "invisibility" of such aircraft is also due to their radio-absorbent coating.
    However, to attain a marked decrease in "visibility" in the meter-wave band, one must ensure a substantial increase in the thickness of the "smearing".

    This inevitably ends up with a greater mass of the aircraft and, consequently, a degradation in its flying characteristics.

    The radar reveals its reliability in all meteorological conditions. It ensures failproof performance at minus 50 C and can withstand almost unlimited heat.

    Environmental humidity doesn't affect its performance. An apparently cumbersome antenna mast retains its serviceability under conditions of an ice-slick and 35 m/s wind.

    The radar reveals good mobility. Its structures, devices and mechanisms are arranged on eight semi-trailers towed by trucks and can be moved by rail, air and water. It can be set up by a crew within less than 24 hours (22 hours, to be precise) without preliminary training, by merely looking in the manual. After turning on the power, it is operational within seconds.

    The radar may be controlled equally well from the radar post located in the van and a remote control station equipped with seats for the commander (or operations duty officer), guidance navigator and operator. The remote station contains radar control equipment and three indicators. It uses a cable link and is effective at a distance of 1 km from the radar. In addition, it allows connection of another similar radar.

    The mobile radar on march

    The radar displays target position in a three coordinate system. Its coverage is 500 km in range, 40 km in height (16 deg. in elevation) and is unlimited in azimuth. The guaranteed detection ranges for a fighter flying at altitudes of 10,000 m and 20,000 m are 300 km and 400 km, respectively; the targets flying at an altitude of 500 m can be detected with confidence at a distance of at least 65 km. It has a fighter detection ceiling of 60 km. As well as the numerous indisputable advantages of the meter-wave band, the radar also preserves a coordinate measuring accuracy. The rms errors do not exceed 500 m in range, 850 m in height and 24 in azimuth.

    The electronic altimeter determines target elevation as well as range and azimuth, and also ensures a fairly high rate of output of the coordinates in two modes: in semi-automatic mode, when the operator singles out the targets for tracking, and in automatic mode - the coordinates of the locked-on targets are produced by a special computer. By sending an interrogation radio signal via the "Parol" (password) IFF system, the target can be identified to establish its national status.

    It also provides for an air situation simulator, which displays the picture on an indicator screen without emitting radio pulses.

    This is extremely useful during the training of radar crews. It also comprises a built-in functional test and diagnostics system. Information can be obtained on full readiness of the radar for operation or location of a trouble within the shortest possible time. As the equipment is built of units and the optimum number of spares is furnished with a set of spare parts and accessories, the location and replacement of the faulty component do not affect, for all practical purposes, the promptness of the crew's actions.

    The 1L13-3 two-coordinate
    radar

    The radar may be supplied with electrical power from industrial mains. If such a power source is not available, it can be powered by a self-contained power supply system, consisting of two Diesel-driven power plants (four 100-kW and three 50-kW Diesel-generator sets, including the reserve ones) and a distributor-converter. The self-contained system is energized and controlled from the radar post.

    The radar's designers took into account safety and life-support systems and ensured that comfortable conditions were provided for the crew. The hermetic
    sealing of the work stations and equipment used to clean the outside air provide reliable protection for the crew against the ingress of the chemical and
    radioactive agents. The radar boasts an effective fire-protection system. An air conditioning system contributes to the work's convenience during combat operations.

    The other meter-wave band radar, 1L13-3, is successfully employed to monitor air space and integrated in a system used to ensure air traffic control of military and civilian targets. It may also be used in an automated air defense or air force control system, or may be employed independently (e.g., as part of a rapid deployment force).

    The 55Zh6-1 three-coordinate
    radar

    The radar is highly, mobile: its equipment is arranged on three trucks and one trailer. The crew sets up the radar equipment within 45 min. The radar makes it possible to feed at a high rate data on the positions of flying targets in two dimensions: in azimuth (unlimited) and in range (up to 300 km). The highest altitude a fighter aircraft can be detected at is 27 km. Like the 55Zh6-1, the 1L13-3 is equipped with an automatically controlled anti-jamming system, which uses multi-channel self-balancing and digital scan-mode selection equipment. It is also provided with monitoring and automatic trouble location equipment. The radar may be powered from the industrial mains or itsown electric power plant, comprising two 30-kW Diesel-generator sets.

    The air conditioners guarantee operators' comfort, while the automatic fire-fighting system and filtering-and-ventilating units ensure their safety. The most important feature is its ability to detect "the invisible" aircraft. Clearly, these radars are related to the world's most advanced class of military hardware.
    http://www.milparade.ru/special/s461.htm
    __________________________________________________ ________
    US, India and Israel. Together we will defeat terrorism.
    I prefer communists to islamic terrorists, atleast I know where my enemy is!

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh Milparade is a real reliable news source:LOL

      Stealth doesn't work as well against networked ground radar as it does against other aircraft coming straight at you, but it does drasticly reduce it's chance of being detected.

      Comment


      • #4
        I dont disagree that this is a russian news source. Just saw the article and thought would get inputs and opinion on this.

        However, the russians are great designers and innovators and among the best theortists. I personally would not brush it aside. Given the money, they have the potential to beat anyone in tech development.
        __________________________________________________ ________
        US, India and Israel. Together we will defeat terrorism.
        I prefer communists to islamic terrorists, atleast I know where my enemy is!

        Comment


        • #5
          Given the money, they have the potential to beat anyone in tech development.
          They don't have the money, and even when they did after the mid 1970's they were behind us.

          Comment


          • #6
            Meter Wave radar DOES detect stealth ROUGHLY, but DOES NOT guide a surface to air missile.

            Therefore, it is useful only for directing intercepts, or in providing slewing data for onboard IR guided SAM lauchers(if present).

            mm and cm wave bands are required for guidance, and are virtually useless against 'stealth' as we presently employ it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Cool video

              http://www.usrcjc.org/photogallery/F22TO.mpeg
              "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by sam0001
                I dont disagree that this is a russian news source. Just saw the article and thought would get inputs and opinion on this.

                However, the russians are great designers and innovators and among the best theortists. I personally would not brush it aside. Given the money, they have the potential to beat anyone in tech development.
                The Russians have been 10-15 years behind us on conventional fighter technology (i.e. Fulcrum, Flanker)

                They have even come up with anything the equivalent of the F-117 yet, and it's been 25 years.
                "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

                Comment


                • #9
                  I read somewhrere that the ChiComms were working on synchronizing three radars, two airborn and oneground based. Supposedly this will allow them to see stealth planes, because the reflected radar waves that the ground radar won't see, the Airborn ones will. Is this making any sense?
                  Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                  Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    They could detect it, shooting it down is another story.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yeah, but if you've got a standard CAP all over the country it wouldn't be hard to shot it down. All the stealth would sense are search radars until some fighter jock goes in for a fox-four
                      Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

                      Abusing Yellow is meant to be a labor of love, not something you sell to the highest bidder.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bigross86
                        I read somewhrere that the ChiComms were working on synchronizing three radars, two airborn and oneground based. Supposedly this will allow them to see stealth planes, because the reflected radar waves that the ground radar won't see, the Airborn ones will. Is this making any sense?
                        Well, it wouldn't really matter in the event of a war, Chinese airborne radar assets would probably be the very first thing to be taken out.
                        "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "All the stealth would sense are search radars until some fighter jock goes in for a fox-four"

                          Even if enemy assets can track a F-22 and vector friendly fighters to intercept they'll still have to close to IR missile range to engage.

                          Radar guided missiles can't track an F-22 unless they are VERY close.

                          The F-22 on the other hand with it's APG-77 and US AWACS support should know the enemy is coming long before that point, and have little problem feeding the interloping fighters an AMRAAM a piece.

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