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  • #16
    Originally posted by highsea
    Range is classified. It's a "megawatt-class" laser- how many megawatts is not public information. The plan is to build a small fleet of them though. They can be refueled in flight, so airfields are not such a problem.

    They've also recently discovered that they can store the chemicals necessary for the Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser for weeks at a time on the aircraft, likewise increasing longevity.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jgetti
      They've also recently discovered that they can store the chemicals necessary for the Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser for weeks at a time on the aircraft, likewise increasing longevity.
      This also means perfect accuracy is not needed and the plane can simply shoot the laser across the missiles flightpath.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jgetti
        One of the largest issues encountered thus far is diffraction that occurs as the laser beam passes through the atmosphere. Since the atmosphere is not a uniform medium, diffraction will be different based upon the atmospheric conditions between the point of laser initiation and the target. That's where it really gets tricky.
        I haven't seen this proble.....

        in general if number of shots is not limited - airbone lazer can shoot two or three times within some short period of time but still hit its target..... I am sure that this will be economically viable but how much do you think a single lazer shot may cost?

        Originally posted by jgetti
        No laser has ever been developed which can focus enough energy on a target the size of an ICBM to destroy it (render it impotent) at the theater ranges this thing is being designed for. There are 2 reasons a modified 747 is being used as the platform for ABL. First, it's one of the only aircraft with the weight and volume capacity necessary to carry all the chemicals and hardware necessary to produce such a powerful beam. Second, it is one of the only aircraft that can supply the power requirements of the ABL system and still have enough thrust to stay aloft.
        how about Ukrainian An-124 or C-5 Galaxy? Are they big and powerfull enogh?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by highsea
          Range is classified. It's a "megawatt-class" laser- how many megawatts is not public information. The plan is to build a small fleet of them though. They can be refueled in flight, so airfields are not such a problem.
          while having a beer with my friend who was scientist in optical physics (now he trades stocks) we talked about the probable size of Oxygen Iodine Laser, the hight at which Boieing can fly and how atmosphere consumes the energy of a lazer at different hights and density of atmosphere, the radius of the earth and how ionosphere of the earth can consume the energy.....

          he made his estimation that system will not shoot further than 300km.... He was firm that this is maximum possible given size and technologies. This guy was styduing chemical lazers 7 years ago so he knows much about it....

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          • #20
            Unofficially, the range is quoted at "hundreds of miles". The COIL modules operated at 118% of their planned output on the first full power test shot. The key to the range is the deformable mirror- the beam does not leave the turret in a focused form, the intervening atmosphere is used as a lens to focus the beam by the time it gets to the target.

            To answer your other questions- The system will be good for about a dozen shots before the chemicals need replenished. Cost per shot is estimated at $10-15,000.
            "We will go through our federal budget – page by page, line by line – eliminating those programs we don’t need, and insisting that those we do operate in a sensible cost-effective way." -President Barack Obama 11/25/2008

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            • #21
              Originally posted by highsea
              Unofficially, the range is quoted at "hundreds of miles". The COIL modules operated at 118% of their planned output on the first full power test shot. The key to the range is the deformable mirror- the beam does not leave the turret in a focused form, the intervening atmosphere is used as a lens to focus the beam by the time it gets to the target.

              To answer your other questions- The system will be good for about a dozen shots before the chemicals need replenished. Cost per shot is estimated at $10-15,000.
              the cost is quite cheap compared to the cost of even a simple missile....... you can shoot many times then if period between shots is short enough......

              it is even cheaper than any normal AA missile.....

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              • #22
                Well your stock 747 is going to cost you 200m. Add in the extra that the military needs to make it somewhat more survivable and the laser and the platform dev costs and I wouldnt be suprise if if costs 500m. Build 10 of them... $10b for an effective SDI platform aint much.

                Anyway; id be suprised if range scales (linearly) with power. The more powerful your laser, the more you are going to heat up the intervening atmosphere during each shot and the less accurate you will get. Obviously I havnt the foggiest as to how they have got around such limitations (which they must have) but it must still be a factor. There must be a balence between attenuation and the effects of attenuation that produces a power 'sweet spot' for a given quality and ingenuity of optical device.

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