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Why was the US only able to field 98 infantry divisions during WW2?

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  • Triple C
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    Memory is the second thing to go.....
    Actually I believe you may have posted it in the WWII mega thread. Anyway, I thought it was Marshall who originally suggested to mobilize 265 divisions. However, FDR wished to prioritize industrial output over raw fighting power, so Marshall revised his plans resulting in "the 99 division gamble."

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  • looking4NSFS
    replied
    https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/wp-co...2020_Bonin.pdf

    Although the thrust of this article by Bonin is about the core competencies the Army needs to demonstrate in providing strategic landpower, he uses the Army of WWII as his example and explores some of the reasoning, constraints, competing requirements that resulted in the number of combat divisions fielded.

    From the article:

    The National Defense Act of 1920 specifically charged the War Department and the Army General Staff with overall mobilization planning and preparation in the event of war and remained unchanged until 1947. In early 1942, then Chief of Staff General George Catlett Marshall organized the Army into three major administrative commands—Army Ground Forces (AGF), Army Service Forces (ASF), and Army Air Force (AAF). In 1945, 70 percent of AGF and ASF (some six million personnel) were deployed overseas, of which only 20 percent could be found in the 89 combat divisions, all overseas. Was some 80 percent of the Army unnecessary overhead or tail to the divisional tooth? No! This arrangement was the complete force structure required for the Army to perform its core competencies including providing prompt strategic landpower and simultaneously sustaining global campaigns in two theaters of war—Europe and Pacific—and six separate theaters of operations.

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by astralis View Post
    just to pile on...don't say I never did anything for you, boss...

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbi...-bodysuit.html
    You're going to Hell for that, Eric....

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Fortunately for me Colonel, I got divorced and remarried at a pretty young age.

    At least we still have SWWNBN, right Sir?
    I got married at 48 but I wasn't stupid. I married a woman 26 years younger than me so still have everything.

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  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Give the man some Polaroids, stat!

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  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    My eyes! My eyes!

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  • astralis
    replied
    just to pile on...don't say I never did anything for you, boss...

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbi...-bodysuit.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Fortunately for me Colonel, I got divorced and remarried at a pretty young age.

    At least we still have SWWNBN, right Sir?
    The only thing I got to say to that is that my eyes are also going.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by WABs_OOE View Post
    Divorce got to my sex drive before age did.
    Fortunately for me Colonel, I got divorced and remarried at a pretty young age.

    At least we still have SWWNBN, right Sir?

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Memory is the second thing to go.....
    Divorce got to my sex drive before age did.

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    Yep, you posted that on this thread :-)
    Memory is the second thing to go.....

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Not sure if I posted here or elsewhere. One of the greatest outcomes of World War 1 was the Army Industrial College.
    Yep, you posted that on this thread :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by looking4NSFS View Post
    Marshall had a keen recollection of the mobilization mistakes made in the preparation of the United States armed forces for World War One.

    The mobilization for World War II included an industrial component necessary to provide the "means" to execute the war strategy. This industrial component also required able hands and was part of the overall mobilization equation that had to be considered. Not everyone could be drafted or the manufacturing base ceased even with the inclusion of women and minorities at levels unprecedented at the time. "Writing the Victory Plan of 1941" by Kirkpatrick goes into the mobilization efforts in a digestible 93 pages.
    Not sure if I posted here or elsewhere. One of the greatest outcomes of World War 1 was the Army Industrial College. Opened in the early 1920s it was tasked in each graduating class to provide a look at the industrial capacity of the US and determine who could do what...i.e., that Smith-Corona could make rifles, Singer could make machine guns, GM could make aircraft, etc. The brainchild of industrialist Bernard Baruch this set the Army up for success upon mobilization. In late July 1940 Marshall received an emergency supplemental 1940 Army budget. The amount given was greater to the sum of all Army budgets from 1921-1940.

    Rather then going...."what do I do with all of this money?" he pulled out the plan from the class of 1940 from AIC and started paying for industry to retool.

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  • looking4NSFS
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

    The numbers DO NOT include those who were inducted but later discharged for disease/non battle injuries. And the Army Green Book series (available at https://history.army.mil for free download) covers this exceptionally well in the the volumes (yes, volumes) on mobilization.

    Bottomline, Marshall knew what the fvck he was doing.
    Marshall had a keen recollection of the mobilization mistakes made in the preparation of the United States armed forces for World War One.

    The mobilization for World War II included an industrial component necessary to provide the "means" to execute the war strategy. This industrial component also required able hands and was part of the overall mobilization equation that had to be considered. Not everyone could be drafted or the manufacturing base ceased even with the inclusion of women and minorities at levels unprecedented at the time. "Writing the Victory Plan of 1941" by Kirkpatrick goes into the mobilization efforts in a digestible 93 pages.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by looking4NSFS; 24 Aug 20,, 18:37.

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Per the VA the US officially had slightly more than 16.3 million Veterans of WW 2....in the years 1940 - 1946. Those are the years counted since the US started mobilizing in 1940 and hostilities did not officially end until 1946.

    Keep in mind that number includes Army, AAF, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, Merchant Marine, USPHS, NOAA & Coast & Geodetic Survey Corps. Merchant Marines who spent a set amount of time in combat zones earned veteran status in the 1980s...commissioned officers all along.

    Total casualties suffered by the US in the war were around 1.1 million....killed/wounded/missing.

    The numbers DO NOT include those who were inducted but later discharged for disease/non battle injuries. And the Army Green Book series (available at https://history.army.mil for free download) covers this exceptionally well in the the volumes (yes, volumes) on mobilization.

    Bottomline, Marshall knew what the fvck he was doing.

    Leave a comment:

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